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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 23, 2004
The head of the Baltimore City Juvenile Justice Center has resigned. In a two-page letter of resignation dated June 8, Phyllis D.K. Hildreth talked of the successful opening of the center last year and referred to "significant challenges" ahead. She did not give specific reasons for her resignation, which takes effect June 30 and did not respond to interview requests. Juvenile Court Judge Martin P. Welch said Hildreth was an innovative and dedicated administrator who fought to improve Maryland's juvenile justice system.
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NEWS
Ian Duncan | August 16, 2014
Malik Smallwood lounged in front of Baltimore's Juvenile Justice Center, puffing on a cigarette and his recalling his teenage years spent in and out of the facility - he called it "kiddie camp. " Now 18, Smallwood said temptation loomed on the streets. Detention, in a way, was easier and saved him from that. Yet any attempts to rehabilitate him at the East Baltimore facility didn't do much good, he acknowledged. He had returned for a hearing on his latest juvenile charge. Baltimore law enforcement officials and child advocates have long questioned the efficacy and ethics of locking up juveniles accused of breaking the law, arguing it can doom them to a life of crime.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 11, 1999
Ground was broken yesterday for the $41 million Baltimore City Juvenile Justice Center, which will house courtrooms, offices, social services, and intake and detention facilities for young offenders when it opens in two years.Gov. Parris N. Glendening and Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend were among the state and local officials attending the ceremonial groundbreaking on a 5-acre site -- the former home of a Hillen Tire outlet, south of Old Town Mall -- bounded by North Gay, Hillen, Front and Exeter streets.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2012
Department of Justice officials toured the Baltimore City Detention Center on Wednesday amid complaints about conditions for juveniles held at the facility, officials confirmed. Agency officials would not comment on what they observed during the tour. Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, a Baltimore Democrat, said in a statement that the visit was "urgently needed and if any unsafe or unsecure conditions are found, they must be immediately remedied. " Cummings wrote to the Justice Department's Civil Rights Division this month, after The Baltimore Sun highlighted the increasing concerns of attorneys and youth advocates about conditions for juveniles who are being held at the jail on adult charges.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | September 7, 2004
MARCUS Dixon stood there on Gay Street with all the wisdom of his 21 years informing him that he is an urban cliche. He is a school dropout, a repeat criminal offender, a father without benefit of wedlock. He promises to do better. In the city of Baltimore, all of the above puts him among the tens of thousands. He came to Gay Street because this is where they keep the Baltimore City Juvenile Justice Center, the new $62 million facility described by critics as a disastrous piece of a system that is described as a catastrophe.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2004
Authorities were searching yesterday for a 17-year-old boy who staged a Spider-Man-like escape from the city juvenile justice center - the first since the Gay Street facility began confining children in October. The boy, detained on drug charges, was apparently upset by a judge's order Tuesday committing him to the Charles H. Hickey Jr. School, and escaped from an enclosed courtyard by scaling a three-story building, said state Department of Juvenile Services spokeswoman LaWanda Edwards.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2003
On a tour of the new $45 million Baltimore City Juvenile Justice Center on North Gay Street yesterday, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. called the "impressive facility" a good investment for Maryland taxpayers. At the event, also attended by City Council members, legislators and court officials, state Juvenile Justice Secretary Kenneth C. Montague Jr. announced that Phyllis D.K. Hildreth has been named managing director of the new center, which is to open in stages beginning next month. Hildreth, 45, is a former deputy secretary of the department and once was chief counsel for the Maryland Office of the Public Defender.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Sun Staff | September 23, 1995
Baltimore's leading business group promised yesterday to push hard for expanded government-funded drug treatment and juvenile crime prevention programs, and to urge its members to step up their efforts to make workplaces drug free.The Greater Baltimore Committee (GBC) also pledged its "full and complete support" to building a juvenile justice center in Baltimore and to creating a court to deal swiftly with minor crimes."Let me assure you that the GBC is not idly talking about this subject matter," said William L. Jews, chairman of the organization, which represents more than 700 of the largest businesses in the Baltimore metropolitan area.
NEWS
March 3, 1994
Articles in The Sun and The Evening Sun yesterday incorrectly reported the owner of a site planned for a Juvenile Justice Center on Wabash Avenue. The site is owned by the Mass Transit Administration.The Sun regrets the errors.
NEWS
January 17, 1996
An article in yesterday's editions incorrectly implied that Hillen Tire, a business on the proposed site of a new state juvenile justice center, has closed. The company is still operating on the property at Hillen and Front streets. If officials go forward with the center at that site, construction likely will not begin until at least late 1997.The Sun regrets the errors.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2012
The city of Baltimore on Wednesday accepted about $600,000 in state grants for a variety of criminal justice initiatives. The grants will fund efforts to process charges for juveniles more quickly, develop a database of juvenile vehicle thefts, fund overtime for a gun trace task force and train investigators of sexual assaults. The city's spending panel, the Board of Estimates, approved the grants Wednesday. Sheryl Goldstein, who recently resigned as the director of the mayor's office of criminal justice, was frequently praised at City Hall for her ability to secure grants for police initiatives.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2012
Youths detained at the Baltimore City Detention Center were moved over the weekend into a building that has air conditioning, state officials confirmed. The move comes amid increasing concerns over conditions for juveniles charged as adults at the city jail. While state officials who oversee the facility said it was planned as part of renovations at an annex building where juveniles were held, they also said those plans were accelerated based on what was best for the youths. The living quarters will continue to be a dorm-style arrangement in a 50-bed housing unit in the Wyatt Building, formerly used for an adult drug treatment program.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2012
The city judge didn't need to hear from the boy — his black eye told the story. Held at the youth annex of the Baltimore City Detention Center while awaiting trial on armed-robbery charges, the boy, who celebrated his 17th birthday at the facility last month, had been assaulted over the weekend and since then deprived of the opportunity to attend school, according to his attorney. This, the attorney noted, came amid increased complaints about poor conditions and oversight at the facility, including an article Sunday in The Baltimore Sun detailing increasing concerns from attorneys and juvenile advocates.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2012
The young boys involved in the shooting death of Monae Turnage, whose body they hid under trash bags in an East Baltimore alley, were sentenced in juvenile court Wednesday. The 13-year-old who said he pulled the trigger will be committed indefinitely to a treatment facility; the 12-year-old who helped him move the body will be monitored by the Department of Juvenile Services while living with a relative in Harford County. But the family of Monae — the bubbly 13-year-old who wanted to be a pediatrician — sat outside the downtown Juvenile Justice Center after the hearing, stunned at the outcome.
NEWS
By Michael Nakan | December 27, 2010
Every year, Baltimore City asks: "Why?" Why is the homicide rate in this city so high? Why is there such rampant addiction to drugs? Why are so many kids growing up to be violent criminals? The answer may lie, in part, within the Baltimore City Juvenile Justice Center, whose most striking feature is its sheer amount of infrastructure. There is a school equipped with dozens of computers, a built-in basketball court and a lounge with video games and movies. On Thanksgiving, the center hosted a dinner for all of the juveniles in the facility and their parents.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz | June 25, 2008
The U.S. Department of Justice filed motions in federal court yesterday to end its oversight of two long-troubled Maryland juvenile justice facilities. In August 2002, federal authorities began investigating conditions, including poor health care and inadequate education, at Cheltenham Youth Facility and Charles H. Hickey Jr. School, eventually entering into an oversight agreement with the state Department of Juvenile Services.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Sun Staff Writer | March 2, 1994
Articles in The Sun and The Evening Sun yesterday incorrectly reported the owner of a site planned for a Juvenile Justice Center on Wabash Avenue. The site is owned by the Mass Transit Administration.The Sun regrets the errors.A plan to build a $35 million courthouse and youth detention center on city-owned land off Cold Spring Lane has been scrapped in favor of a new site on Wabash Avenue near the Reisterstown Road Plaza Metro station.About a month ago, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke ignited a controversy when he announced that the Cold Spring Lane site was being considered for the juvenile justice center and the new Northern District police station.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,Staff Writer | January 30, 1994
Angered by a proposal to build a $35 million juvenile justice center on Cold Spring Lane community, leaders from area neighborhoods rebuked Baltimore officials at a forum yesterday for what they said was a plan that excluded their input."
NEWS
April 4, 2008
Past time to fix juvenile justice My memory is that Maryland has been "reforming" its juvenile justice system for the past 20 years - e.g., privatizing the Charles H. Hickey Jr. School and then bringing it back under state control, doing the same thing with the Victor Cullen Center, addressing the abuse at juvenile boot camps and closing the Bowling Brook Preparatory School. And now we see recurring issues at the Baltimore Juvenile Justice Center ("Violence at juvenile center up again," March 28)
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN REPORTER | March 28, 2008
Violence behind bars at Baltimore's juvenile detention center has increased sharply this year, according to data released this week by the juvenile justice monitor, a setback amid efforts to rein in the long-troubled facility. In the first three months of the year, there have been 155 youth-on-youth assaults and 28 youth-on-staff assaults at the Baltimore City Juvenile Justice Center - up nearly 40 percent from the same period last year. Use of physical restraints is up 68 percent this year compared with this time last year.
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