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NEWS
August 22, 2011
Regarding your editorial about the potential cost savings from reducing the size of Maryland's prison population ("Downsizing Md.'s prisons," Aug. 14), there is a simple, concrete step that the governor could take now to achieve that goal: Scrap plans to build a new jail in Baltimore City to house youths under the age of 18 who are charged as adults. This facility alone is estimated to cost approximately $100 million to build and $8 million a year to operate. While many advocates agree that holding youths charged as adults in the Baltimore City Detention Center is problematic, the construction and operation of a new pretrial facility is an ill-advised investment that will unjustifiably strain the state budget while offering little prospect for reducing the crime rate.
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NEWS
Ian Duncan | August 16, 2014
Malik Smallwood lounged in front of Baltimore's Juvenile Justice Center, puffing on a cigarette and his recalling his teenage years spent in and out of the facility - he called it "kiddie camp. " Now 18, Smallwood said temptation loomed on the streets. Detention, in a way, was easier and saved him from that. Yet any attempts to rehabilitate him at the East Baltimore facility didn't do much good, he acknowledged. He had returned for a hearing on his latest juvenile charge. Baltimore law enforcement officials and child advocates have long questioned the efficacy and ethics of locking up juveniles accused of breaking the law, arguing it can doom them to a life of crime.
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NEWS
By Shauna Miller and Capital News Service | February 9, 2010
Bowling Brook Preparatory School opened its doors in Carroll County in 1957 as a small school for orphans. But by the time 17-year-old Isaiah Simmons died there after being improperly restrained by staff in 2007, Bowling Brook had grown into a large, privately run juvenile detention center housing more than 170 boys. A law passed after Simmons' death capped the number of beds allowed at state-run residential facilities at 48, but left privately run programs open to expansion.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2013
An ambitious plan to secure tens of millions of dollars in state funding to fix Baltimore's dilapidated school buildings is the top priority for city officials in the General Assembly session that begins next week. The city's delegates and state senators are also united in opposition to Gov. Martin O'Malley's plan to build a new juvenile jail in Baltimore. "The governor had planned on building a new juvenile jail. That kind of flies in the face of the philosophy for most of us," said Del. Curt Anderson, who chairs the city's House delegation.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2012
In the J. DeWeese Carter Center in Kent County, youths would pick fights that sometimes turned into melees, recalled Rodney Stallworth, who spent four months there last year on a drug charge. The detention system frustrated the 18-year-old East Baltimore resident, but he also called it a refuge. He sometimes acted out violently because he knew it would keep him there — and away from drugs and guns on the street. "Since we can't go home, we would try to send the staff home" angry, he said.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1999
In the wake of a string of security lapses and incidents of abuse at state juvenile justice facilities, Gov. Parris N. Glendening is dispatching a team of management experts to improve the troubled Department of Juvenile Justice.Mike Morrill, Glendening's chief press spokesman, said the governor and Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend decided to send in the team after hearing "a few little rumblings" about problems in the department.The experts -- known unofficially in state government circles as a "SWAT team" -- will spend an estimated two to four months assessing the operations and procedures of the department, Morrill said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 12, 1998
JONESBORO, Ark. -- Just before a judge remanded 14-year-old Mitchell Johnson and 12-year-old Andrew Golden into juvenile detention for a middle school shooting that killed a teacher and four girls, the older boy offered a childlike excuse.He said he did not mean to do it."I thought we were going to shoot over their heads," said the trembling Johnson youth, who pleaded guilty in an adjudication hearing -- the juvenile court equivalent of a trial -- in the Craighead County Courthouse yesterday, on his 14th birthday.
NEWS
March 22, 1995
Two Meade High School students pleaded guilty yesterday in Anne Arundel Juvenile Court to charges stemming from a brawl in a hallway last fall that injured the school librarian.A 16-year-old pleaded guilty to battery and a 15-year-old to disturbing school activities.Donald Gobbi, the 50-year-old librarian, was knocked to the floor and kicked in the head, back and legs several times after he rushed to intervene, according to testimony. The brawl occurred in a second-floor hallway about 10:30 a.m. Sept.
NEWS
January 13, 1993
Council opposes juvenile facilityThe Sykesville Town Council voted unanimously Monday to oppose the location of a juvenile detention facility on the grounds of Springfield Hospital Center.Members also will push for a public hearing before the state Department of Juvenile Services makes a final decision on where to house juveniles awaiting trial.In a meeting with state legislators last week, Mary Ann Saar, state secretary of juvenile services, proposed renovating the center's Lane Building into a 74-bed detention center at a cost of $5,525,000.
NEWS
April 19, 2004
THE RESULTS of a 20-month federal investigation into conditions at two Maryland juvenile detention centers are absolutely appalling - but they are hardly surprising. The findings, announced Friday, should be a source of shame to everyone involved in making excuses for what goes on at the Charles H. Hickey Jr. School in Baltimore County and the Cheltenham Youth Facility in Prince George's County. The U.S. Justice Department found that juveniles are at serious risk at those two facilities because of "constitutional deficiencies" in how they are consigned and monitored, how they are treated for mental and physical health issues, how they are educated, and how they are protected from fire, from violent staff, and from one another.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2012
In the J. DeWeese Carter Center in Kent County, youths would pick fights that sometimes turned into melees, recalled Rodney Stallworth, who spent four months there last year on a drug charge. The detention system frustrated the 18-year-old East Baltimore resident, but he also called it a refuge. He sometimes acted out violently because he knew it would keep him there — and away from drugs and guns on the street. "Since we can't go home, we would try to send the staff home" angry, he said.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2012
A month after being evicted from a park near the Inner Harbor, members of Occupy Baltimore sought Monday afternoon to establish a five-day encampment at the site of a proposed juvenile detention center in East Baltimore. As Maryland State Police watched, protestors began erecting a plywood structure — painted red and labeled "school" — on the site near the city's complex of jails and prisons. About 50 protestors were at the site by late afternoon. State police at the site would not say whether the five-day encampment would be allowed.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2012
Maryland State Police arrested six members of Occupy Baltimore Monday evening for allegedly trespassing on the state-owned site of a proposed juvenile detention center in East Baltimore. The arrests of four men and two women came about two hours after they began erecting a plywood structure — painted red and representing a schoolhouse — inside the fenced site at East Madison and Graves streets near the city's complex of jails and prisons. State police spokesman Greg Shipley said the six individuals were told they were entering private property, which is owned by the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2012
Maryland State Police sought Monday evening to work out a peaceful solution with Occupy Baltimore protesters who were building an encampment at the site of a proposed juvenile detention center in East Baltimore. As troopers watched, several protesters began erecting a plywood structure — painted red and representing a schoolhouse — inside the fenced site at East Madison and Graves streets near the city's complex of jails and prisons. But state police spokesman Greg Shipley said Occupy members were not permitted to erect a structure on the property, which is owned by the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services.
NEWS
August 22, 2011
Regarding your editorial about the potential cost savings from reducing the size of Maryland's prison population ("Downsizing Md.'s prisons," Aug. 14), there is a simple, concrete step that the governor could take now to achieve that goal: Scrap plans to build a new jail in Baltimore City to house youths under the age of 18 who are charged as adults. This facility alone is estimated to cost approximately $100 million to build and $8 million a year to operate. While many advocates agree that holding youths charged as adults in the Baltimore City Detention Center is problematic, the construction and operation of a new pretrial facility is an ill-advised investment that will unjustifiably strain the state budget while offering little prospect for reducing the crime rate.
NEWS
By Shauna Miller and Shauna Miller,Capital News Service | February 9, 2010
Bowling Brook Preparatory School opened its doors in Carroll County in 1957 as a small school for orphans. But by the time 17-year-old Isaiah Simmons died there after being improperly restrained by staff in 2007, Bowling Brook had grown into a large, privately run juvenile detention center housing more than 170 boys. A law passed after Simmons' death capped the number of beds allowed at state-run residential facilities at 48, but left privately run programs open to expansion.
NEWS
By Charles J. Kehoe and Robert Bernstein | July 21, 2004
ON ANY NIGHT, nearly 2,000 youths languish in juvenile detention facilities across the country because they cannot access mental health services. As a result, children are endangered and traumatized and corrections staff struggle to serve a population they are ill-equipped to handle, all at taxpayer expense. Until recently, policy-makers have ignored the issue. Democratic Rep. Henry A. Waxman of California and Republican Sen. Susan M. Collins of Maine commissioned the first national survey of children held in juvenile detention centers awaiting mental health services.
NEWS
June 15, 2003
THE BICKERING over an independent monitor's report on alleged abuses at Charles H. Hickey Jr. School should stop. The focus of state agencies should be on the private contractor operating the juvenile detention facility in Baltimore County and whether it is providing a safe environment for youngsters detained there. Monitor Philip J. Merson's report, made public last week, discussed 20 suspected cases of abuse and neglect at Hickey that he learned about in nine visits there this year. Mr. Merson also criticized juvenile justice workers, Maryland State Police and child welfare workers for not properly investigating alleged incidents - a finding roundly disputed by the state's juvenile justice agency.
NEWS
August 5, 2009
Teen switched to home detention in firebombing A teenager who was ordered last week to spend the rest of his summer in a juvenile detention facility for his role in the firebombing of a Piney Orchard town house, in retaliation for the homicide of a Crofton youth, was switched Tuesday to home detention. Anne Arundel County Juvenile Court Master Cynthia Ferris changed her earlier decision, putting the 16-year-old's punishment in line with the other two juveniles in the case, who have been released from a detention facility.
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