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Juvenile Delinquents

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By GREGORY KANE | May 6, 2006
I guess compared with Jerrod Hamlett, Bryant C. Jones, Jennifer Lynne Morelock and Jason David Woycio, I got off lucky. Last June, a 13-year-old boy hurled a bottle at Hamlett and then fatally shot him in the dispute that followed. The boy had turned 14 when he was committed to an out-of-state juvenile facility. Jones was holding a "Sweet 16" birthday party for his daughter last month. When he tried to eject an unruly 16-year-old boy, the kid allegedly pulled a gun and fatally shot Jones.
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NEWS
February 4, 2011
Our home of over 40 years in Rosedale was burglarized January 12th, including the theft of two cars. The same group burglarized a home in the Hamiltowne section on January 13th, including the theft of a car. The culprits were apprehended, and all three cars were recovered on January 14th after diligent efforts by the White Marsh precinct. Even though articles that were obviously taken from each home were recovered in the cars, the juveniles were released to the custody of their parents that night.
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NEWS
By Devon Spurgeon and Devon Spurgeon,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1999
Most high school quarterbacks do not worry about getting kicked off the team for good behavior.But at Oak Hill Academy, the quarterback prays that he does not go the way of the starting offensive line and get freed days before a big game.Oak Hill, near Laurel, is the District of Columbia's maximum-security detention center for violent juvenile delinquents. Almost a third of its inmates are awaiting trial on murder charges or have been convicted of murder. It is also home to what may be the best team in the district's high school football league, the Tigers.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | October 2, 2008
The boys of Victor Cullen watched as the men of the Baltimore Plumbers and Steamfitters union guided welding torches across metal, hot sparks raining on the floor like fireworks. It was the end of the union school tour, and the union leaders were ready to give their charges - who had been in trouble with the law and struggled in school - the hard sell on a career in construction. Money? One said he had made $2.1 million in his 32-year career. Brotherhood? "No matter where you came from, we stick together," another told them.
NEWS
July 19, 2000
IT SEEMS like a no-brainer. The state Department of Juvenile Justice got panned nationwide last year for beating 14 delinquent teens at a boot camp and then reneging on promises of supervised parole after the kids were released. Wouldn't you think officials' response would have included tracking down the 14 teens to make sure they didn't inspire further embarrassing headlines? Well, think again. Some of the kids are back in the news for doing stick-ups, dealing drugs and generally raising hell.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | October 2, 2008
The boys of Victor Cullen watched as the men of the Baltimore Plumbers and Steamfitters union guided welding torches across metal, hot sparks raining on the floor like fireworks. It was the end of the union school tour, and the union leaders were ready to give their charges - who had been in trouble with the law and struggled in school - the hard sell on a career in construction. Money? One said he had made $2.1 million in his 32-year career. Brotherhood? "No matter where you came from, we stick together," another told them.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1999
The violence of the Savage Leadership Challenge -- the bald 15-year-old in fatigues told the judge yesterday -- began with the bus ride there.As the state Department of Juvenile Justice van pulled out of the Greenridge Youth Center in Allegany County and took to the highway, a guard inside the bus began banging on its side. Soon, heads would be banged. Eyes would be poked. Kids would be slammed to the ground."They said, `Your life is over from now on,' " the boy said.The camp loomed closer.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | July 25, 1991
TC An article in The Sun yesterday incorrectly identified the chairman of Youth Services International Inc., a company that bid unsuccessfully for the contract to operate for the state the Charles H. Hickey Jr. School for juvenile delinquents. The chairman's name is W. James Hindman.ANNAPOLIS -- The state Board of Public Works approved yesterday a $50.8 million contract for a Colorado firm to run the Charles H. Hickey Jr. School for juvenile delinquents, but not before debating questions of money and integrity.
NEWS
November 29, 1992
The state's abrupt termination of a private contractor's management of the Charles H. Hickey School for juvenile delinquents provides a fresh chance to re-examine the function and the structure of that troubled facility in Baltimore County that houses 350 of the toughest teen-age offenders.Precipitous though the state's action was, it does not represent the failure of privatization or vindication of the previous state-run administration. Neither approach has proved capable of dealing with the hardest-core delinquents, children with multiple needs for healing but also with defined anti-social attitudes that hinder effective rehabilitation.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1999
Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend ordered top officials at Maryland's juvenile justice and mental health agencies yesterday to figure out why a much higher percentage of black mentally ill juvenile delinquents than white ones are sentenced to jail instead of treatment.Yesterday's editions of The Sun reported that while many white juvenile delinquents are sent to residential treatment centers, most blacks are sentenced to the Charles H. Hickey Jr. School or the Victor Cullen Academy, which lack treatment.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 6, 2006
I guess compared with Jerrod Hamlett, Bryant C. Jones, Jennifer Lynne Morelock and Jason David Woycio, I got off lucky. Last June, a 13-year-old boy hurled a bottle at Hamlett and then fatally shot him in the dispute that followed. The boy had turned 14 when he was committed to an out-of-state juvenile facility. Jones was holding a "Sweet 16" birthday party for his daughter last month. When he tried to eject an unruly 16-year-old boy, the kid allegedly pulled a gun and fatally shot Jones.
NEWS
July 1, 2005
FIVE MORE MONTHS, and the current Charles H. Hickey Jr. School for juvenile delinquents will be no more, promises Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. It's high time. Backers and critics of the holding tank for wayward young men have called for its reform from at least as early as 1967; stories of ill-used wards and overbearing staff started with its first iteration, as the House of Refuge in 1850, and continue. At this point, with most of its buildings beyond dilapidated and haunted by mold, the only reasonable physical reform is destruction.
NEWS
February 10, 2003
Prosecutors and city police work together closely The Sun's editorial "New chief's challenge" (Jan. 27) mischaracterized the level of coordination that occurs each day between the Baltimore Police Department and the state's attorney's office and inaccurately labeled my relationship with former Baltimore police Commissioner Edward T. Norris as "less than cordial." If The Sun had contacted my office, I would have been happy to provide examples of how we work together each day to improve public safety for the citizens of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2000
Four weeks after he barreled a stolen Dodge Neon the wrong way into the Fort McHenry Tunnel, crashing head-on into another car, a 15-year-old Harford County boy yesterday admitted in court that he caused the deaths of two women. The boy, whom The Sun is not identifying because of his age, admitted to two counts of automobile manslaughter in Baltimore's juvenile court - one for each of the dead women. He is scheduled to be sentenced Oct. 16. Because he is a juvenile, the penalty will range from probation to detention at a juvenile facility until he is 21. Yesterday, Assistant State's Attorney Julius A. Silvestri Jr. vividly described the fatal collision for Judge David W. Young.
NEWS
July 19, 2000
IT SEEMS like a no-brainer. The state Department of Juvenile Justice got panned nationwide last year for beating 14 delinquent teens at a boot camp and then reneging on promises of supervised parole after the kids were released. Wouldn't you think officials' response would have included tracking down the 14 teens to make sure they didn't inspire further embarrassing headlines? Well, think again. Some of the kids are back in the news for doing stick-ups, dealing drugs and generally raising hell.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1999
The violence of the Savage Leadership Challenge -- the bald 15-year-old in fatigues told the judge yesterday -- began with the bus ride there.As the state Department of Juvenile Justice van pulled out of the Greenridge Youth Center in Allegany County and took to the highway, a guard inside the bus began banging on its side. Soon, heads would be banged. Eyes would be poked. Kids would be slammed to the ground."They said, `Your life is over from now on,' " the boy said.The camp loomed closer.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1996
Residents of a Woodlawn neighborhood are objecting to a planned group home for troubled juveniles.The home, which would have a limit of eight boys ages 11 to 15, is being proposed by Maximum Life Church Community Development for a house the church owns in the 1900 block of Summit Ave. Neighbors voted against the home at a community meeting last week, saying the area is filled with senior citizens who fear an increase in crime and the disruption of their...
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2000
Four weeks after he barreled a stolen Dodge Neon the wrong way into the Fort McHenry Tunnel, crashing head-on into another car, a 15-year-old Harford County boy yesterday admitted in court that he caused the deaths of two women. The boy, whom The Sun is not identifying because of his age, admitted to two counts of automobile manslaughter in Baltimore's juvenile court - one for each of the dead women. He is scheduled to be sentenced Oct. 16. Because he is a juvenile, the penalty will range from probation to detention at a juvenile facility until he is 21. Yesterday, Assistant State's Attorney Julius A. Silvestri Jr. vividly described the fatal collision for Judge David W. Young.
NEWS
By Devon Spurgeon and Devon Spurgeon,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1999
Most high school quarterbacks do not worry about getting kicked off the team for good behavior.But at Oak Hill Academy, the quarterback prays that he does not go the way of the starting offensive line and get freed days before a big game.Oak Hill, near Laurel, is the District of Columbia's maximum-security detention center for violent juvenile delinquents. Almost a third of its inmates are awaiting trial on murder charges or have been convicted of murder. It is also home to what may be the best team in the district's high school football league, the Tigers.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | June 27, 1999
A 16-year-old offender at the Charles H. Hickey Jr. School in Cub Hill was charged early yesterday in the rape of an employee at the facility for male juvenile delinquents -- an incident that an official acknowledged was the result of a breach in security procedures.Felix Fitzgerald, whose last known address before Hickey was the 400 block of E. Biddle St., was charged as an adult with a first-degree sex offense and first-degree assault in the rape Friday night at the state-owned facility, police said.
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