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Juvenile Crime

NEWS
November 16, 1995
AN EFFORT to impose a late-night curfew on children younger that 17 in Howard and Anne Arundel counties is more like a preventive inoculation than a cure for any specific illness. While there is little doubt that the incidence of juvenile crime has increased in recent years, it has by no means reached crisis proportions in either of these suburban jurisdictions.Sponsoring delegates Frank S. Turner of Howard and Marcia G. Perry of Anne Arundel describe the legislation as a necessary preventive for problems in the making.
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NEWS
By Brian Sullam and Brian Sullam,Staff writer | March 29, 1992
Crime may be on the rise all over the nation, the state and the county, but there has been a sharp drop in juvenile crime in Carroll since 1988."The population of the county has been increasing, the amount of adult crime is increasing, but the number of juvenile cases isstill below that of 1988," said Juvenile Master Peter M. Tabatsko.Last year the number of referrals to the juvenile system dropped 21 percent, and the number of cases referred to the juvenile master dropped 12 percent.Under the juvenile justice system, criminal cases against juveniles are referred to the Department of Juvenile Services.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | April 29, 2007
Five candidates, including two incumbents, are vying for three New Windsor Town Council seats up for grabs in the May 8 election. Incumbents Kevin Null and Steve Farkas are seeking re-election, but Councilwoman Charlotte Hollenbeck is stepping down. Town officials said candidates for the council seats were slow to file. The other three candidates include telecommunications technician F. Tracey Alban II, career firefighter Byron Welker and disc jockey and video production company owner Ed Smith.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | January 28, 1997
Long frustrated by juvenile crime -- and especially by repeat offenders -- police in the Towson Precinct are launching a program to track young criminals and make sure they receive appropriate punishments.If successful, Baltimore County police officials say, the program could be expanded to other precincts."I kept hearing from my officers that they were arresting the same kids over and over again," said Maj. Michael H. Stelmack, commander of the Towson Precinct."I think these kids are falling through the cracks of the system, and when they go to court, it is not always known if they are repeat offenders," he said.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | January 18, 1999
They flutter in like bright winter birds, three girls in colorful down coats. They sign in and move to the homework table -- no prodding from adults needed -- and slide comfortably into the controlled chaos of youngsters doing schoolwork, playing pool and shooting hoops.It's a scene repeated every day after school as dozens of children fill the Lansdowne Police Athletic League center, one of seven PAL/Rec centers in Baltimore County serving 4,000 children ages 7 to 17 each year who might otherwise drift onto the street.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | January 24, 1998
Teen-agers accused of commiting violent crimes in Baltimore could find themselves before a federal judge facing long prison sentences with no chance of parole under a crackdown on juvenile offenders announced yesterday.For the first time in Maryland, U.S. Attorney Lynne A. Battaglia said, her office will consider prosecuting youths as young as 16, bringing the strict sanctions of federal law to some of the city's youngest suspects.Using federal authorities to help combat juvenile crime is an indication, officials said at a news conference, that charging children as adults in state courts isn't enough to deter the most violent youthful offenders.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Write | November 16, 1994
Hanging out on Main Street might be popular with Sykesville teen-agers, but the idle hours are too often degenerating into malicious mischief and vandalism.The town, area schools and community organizations are looking for recreation alternatives that would deter juvenile crime."We have charged a number of juveniles this year and have helped many," Police Chief Wallace P. Mitchell said at the Town Council meeting Monday.Chief Mitchell said police are not "miracle workers" who can stop juvenile crime before it happens.
NEWS
May 21, 1997
WHEN IT COMES to punishing juvenile offenders, there is lots of rhetoric but not enough in the way of thoughtful steps being taken. It is easier to brand young law-breakers as career criminals-in-training than to come up with programs that might deter them from lives of crime or to separate the incorrigible from the redeemable.Unfortunately, Marna McLendon, the state's attorney in Howard County, believes that public humiliation would be good for all juvenile offenders. She wants to go one step farther than the General Assembly did this year when it removed some of the long-standing confidentiality for juvenile records and proceedings.
NEWS
May 21, 1997
THE FUTURE SAFETY of Baltimore County may hinge on how well it deals with trouble-prone juveniles. While crime in the county is dropping, the number of crimes committed by youths is rising.Last year, 35 percent of all serious arrests were committed by children under 18. If thousands of kids grow into adults with no regard for the law, county residents will lose the relative safety they enjoy today. They will pay in a monetary sense, too -- through higher taxes for more jails, more police and public assistance for the dependents these miscreants won't have the skills to support.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | October 23, 2001
During the 1990s, the District of Columbia and Maryland took starkly different approaches to juvenile crime. The district reduced the number of teens it kept jailed while Maryland increased that number. The result: Violent crime among juveniles in Washington declined sharply, while Maryland's violent juvenile crime rate dropped far less, according to a study being released today. The study's findings indicate that Maryland's lock-'em-up approach was mistaken, and should add momentum to a recent shift toward more treatment-oriented approaches to troubled teens, the study's authors said.
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