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NEWS
June 2, 2011
In reference to Andrea Siegel 's article "Grieving mom works to help other youths" (May 30), it is sad and disturbing to witness or hear about teenage gangs who are involved in unacceptable behavior in their conflicts with other gangs or innocent bystanders. While I'm sure our justice system strives to controls this problem, in my opinion society has a responsibility to initiate a more effective rehabilitation program to salvage the lives of these troubled teenagers before they graduate into full fledged adult criminals, hence becoming a heavy liability to our communities, not only as a danger to others, but also as a burden to our justice system through their arrests, court trials, and prisons terms where they will associate with hardened criminals and upon their release start the cycle all over again.
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NEWS
By Ivan Leshinsky | October 1, 2014
The number of young people arrested and brought to the Maryland Department of Juvenile Services (DJS) is down drastically over the past 10 years. Fewer juveniles are being placed in secure detention facilities, and plans for construction of a new juvenile jail in Baltimore City have been shelved, at least temporarily. Some contend that the reduction in the numbers of youth charged and detained is more about revised policing policies than anything else. We've seen the end of zero tolerance, and "youth connection centers" (YCCs)
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NEWS
By David Altschuler | October 30, 1998
IN the waning days of the gubernatorial race, be prepared to hear a bewildering and contradictory set of claims about the extent and nature of juvenile crime in Maryland and what should be done to prevent and reduce such crime. There is probably no greater political football than teen crime and punishment policy.Politicians seem unable to resist scoring points on this critical and highly emotional topic, yet it is precisely because of the understandably emotional and passionate feelings of the public that politicians of all stripes should treat the issue with care, precision and objectivity.
NEWS
July 11, 2014
For far too many young people who get caught up in the criminal justice system, an arrest or conviction for even a minor, non-violent offense can become a one-way ticket to a shrunken future that slams the door on opportunities for the rest of their lives. Being arrested as a teen increases a person's chances of being arrested again as an adult, and teenagers sentenced to jail are more likely to be incarcerated later in life as well. Add to that the nation's harsh drug laws and stiff mandatory minimum sentencing policies and it's no wonder America locks up more of its citizens than any other country in the world.
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane and Gregory P. Kane,Sun Staff Writer | July 16, 1995
There is a lawless element among the youth in Anne Arundel County. A taste for booze, drugs and other people's cars has caused the greatest surge in juvenile crime in recent memory, county police say.The situation is serious enough that the Maryland state's attorney, Frank R. Weathersbee, last week created a team of prosecutors to address the problem of juvenile crime and figure out a way to control it."There was a time when the offenses juveniles committed were minor scuffs in school or with the law," Mr. Weathersbee said in announcing his Juvenile Trial Team.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | July 6, 1995
A town angered by juvenile crime fought back last night.About 200 people -- 25 percent of the population of New Windsor -- filled Town Hall to question police, the state's attorney and juvenile service officials about what to do concerning vandalism, constant curfew violations and unsupervised young people."
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | May 13, 1997
Sometimes you have to play connect-the-dots across the landscape of various front page newspaper stories for a glance at the American psyche. In one story, we learn of alarming increases in the number of children living in poverty. In another, we find that Congress wishes to get tough on juvenile crime.Thus, society establishes a pattern that indicts everyone: First it makes life miserable for those in their time of great vulnerability, and then it punishes them for reacting with childish and destructive behavior to their crummy existence.
NEWS
By Neal R. Peirce | August 18, 1996
THE DOWNTICK in violent juvenile crime in 1995, just reported by Attorney General Janet Reno -- a 2.9 percent drop overall, murders declined 15.2 percent -- doesn't mean we're on our way out of the woods.The new figures follow some terrifying years -- six in which juvenile arrests for murder, rape, robbery and aggravated assault rose 50 percent; seven in which juvenile arrests for weapons law violations doubled; 10 years that saw the number of homicides by juveniles triple.And the decline comes just as experts have been warning of a firestorm of crime as the ranks of 14- to 17-year-olds -- youth in their most violence-prone years -- will increase by 23 percent in the next decade.
NEWS
October 6, 1998
RECENTLY released statistics on juvenile arrests look lik progress, but it's far too early to declare victory.The state's 7 percent reduction in juvenile arrests for violent crime from 1996 to 1997 is an indicator that doesn't tell us about crimes committed by teens who have not been taken into police custody for their misdeeds.Moreover, the juvenile justice system is in no danger of going out of business.Still, the results look impressive: Juvenile arrests in connection with serious crimes -- murder, robbery, rape and aggravated assault -- were down substantially.
NEWS
November 16, 1995
AN EFFORT to impose a late-night curfew on children younger that 17 in Howard and Anne Arundel counties is more like a preventive inoculation than a cure for any specific illness. While there is little doubt that the incidence of juvenile crime has increased in recent years, it has by no means reached crisis proportions in either of these suburban jurisdictions.Sponsoring delegates Frank S. Turner of Howard and Marcia G. Perry of Anne Arundel describe the legislation as a necessary preventive for problems in the making.
NEWS
September 12, 2013
Baltimore officials are considering a proposal by City Councilman Brandon M. Scott to set an earlier curfew to keep unsupervised young people from hanging out in the streets until all hours of the night. It's an idea that Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young and Police Commissioner Anthony Batts have all embraced for one simple reason: Requiring kids to be indoors by a certain hour is one of the best ways to keep them safe after dark. And as an added bonus, it may even lead to some modest reductions in juvenile crime.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | March 2, 2013
With no thanks to the Democratic state senator who represents the area, the Baltimore County community of Perry Hall is safer from gun violence than it was six months ago. We can say that much. Sen. Kathy Klausmeier might have voted against the important gun control bill that her colleagues in the Maryland Senate passed on Thursday, but Bobby Gladden has gone to prison, and that means his former fellow students at Perry Hall High won't have to worry about seeing him with a gun in the cafeteria again.
NEWS
By Bernard C. “Jack” Young | October 7, 2012
With plenty of evidence to refute the need to spend millions to build a jail for juveniles, it would not be far-fetched to expect Gov. Martin O'Malley to instead focus his attention - and our state's precious resources - on projects that prevent youth from engaging in crime. Sadly, that would be a mistake. Recently, Governor O'Malley decided to double-down on the misguided plan to spend more than $70 million building a youth detention facility in Baltimore that studies show is not needed and could ultimately end up being a colossal waste of taxpayer funds.
NEWS
July 25, 2011
As Maryland largest and wealthiest subdivision (and often ranked among the richest in the country), Montgomery County is not usually in the business of seeking advice from its neighbors. That's not mere elitism but much collective expertise at work — a higher percentage of its residents hold post-graduate degrees than any other county in America. As a result, Rockville is home to an activist county government with a fondness for innovation and progressive policymaking. So it comes as a bit of surprise to see the same folks who usually lecture Baltimore on matters of public policy take up a rather well-worn cause about which city residents are more than a little bit familiar: a curfew on teen-agers.
NEWS
June 2, 2011
In reference to Andrea Siegel 's article "Grieving mom works to help other youths" (May 30), it is sad and disturbing to witness or hear about teenage gangs who are involved in unacceptable behavior in their conflicts with other gangs or innocent bystanders. While I'm sure our justice system strives to controls this problem, in my opinion society has a responsibility to initiate a more effective rehabilitation program to salvage the lives of these troubled teenagers before they graduate into full fledged adult criminals, hence becoming a heavy liability to our communities, not only as a danger to others, but also as a burden to our justice system through their arrests, court trials, and prisons terms where they will associate with hardened criminals and upon their release start the cycle all over again.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2011
State officials have invested more manpower and money in an effort to get the most violent offenders sought on warrants off Baltimore's streets. Added Maryland state troopers will join the Warrant Apprehension Task Force, a collaboration of law enforcement agencies, through June in seeking Baltimore suspects in violent crimes such as robbery, assault, gun and sex offenses, domestic violence and more. A grant of nearly $152,000 from the Governor's Office on Crime Control and Prevention will cover overtime costs for the Summer Jumpstart Warrant Initiative.
NEWS
May 18, 2011
Spending $70 to $100 million dollars on a new juvenile jail in East Baltimore — or any new juvenile jail for that matter — is not the best, most cost-effective way to proceed ("Downsizing juvenile jail" May 13). In Baltimore and around the country, there is increasing evidence that community-based alternatives to secure detention are decreasing recidivism rates and improving the lives of juveniles and their families while saving millions of taxpayer dollars. The Baltimore Youth Advocate Program (YAP)
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