Advertisement
HomeCollectionsJuvenile Court
IN THE NEWS

Juvenile Court

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1999
A 14-year-old Francis Scott Key High student has been placed on community detention for 30 days for sharing an anti-depressant prescription drug with five other students at school last week, authorities said.The students, who were not named because of privacy laws, all sought medical treatment for an adverse reaction to a generic form of Paxil, authorities said.One student was admitted overnight to Carroll County General Hospital on Tuesday, hospital officials said.The students are OK and have been referred to juvenile authorities for further action, state police said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 25, 2014
Let me see if I understand this: Marquel Gaffney, 15, murdered Albert Smith, 56, in 2007, was charged as an adult, but pleaded guilty of second-degree murder and was sentenced in juvenile court ( "Baltimore man, 21, charged in second murder in five years," Aug. 5). In 2012, he was convicted of drug crimes and last year he was charged with unauthorized removal of property. In March of this year he pleaded guilty and was sentenced to four years in prison with all but six months suspended.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2014
Morgan Lane Arnold's bedroom at her mother's house was painted pink and lilac, with white unicorns prancing in a border that ran along the walls. Even at 14, her mother said, she still believed in unicorns. The room has been repainted recently, the unicorns vanished under layers of pale blue and sea green, and Arnold, at 15, is now an adult in the eyes of the law. She is charged with first-degree murder and four other counts in the stabbing last year of her father, prominent Howard County businessman and blogger Dennis Lane.
NEWS
Ian Duncan | August 16, 2014
Malik Smallwood lounged in front of Baltimore's Juvenile Justice Center, puffing on a cigarette and his recalling his teenage years spent in and out of the facility - he called it "kiddie camp. " Now 18, Smallwood said temptation loomed on the streets. Detention, in a way, was easier and saved him from that. Yet any attempts to rehabilitate him at the East Baltimore facility didn't do much good, he acknowledged. He had returned for a hearing on his latest juvenile charge. Baltimore law enforcement officials and child advocates have long questioned the efficacy and ethics of locking up juveniles accused of breaking the law, arguing it can doom them to a life of crime.
NEWS
February 14, 2005
WHY DID 18-month-old Alicia Cureton die? So many details of her life in the child welfare system are hidden in juvenile court records, it's hard to even guess. What's clear is that there were plenty of warning signs that might have averted her death - and indications that keeping such secrets could be harming other children, too. Only a relative handful of people know what happens to the 36,000 children passing through the state's juvenile courts each year. Child welfare agencies, caseworkers, lawyers, judges and other court workers are forbidden, by state law and judicial procedure, from telling where these children wind up. That makes it hard to fix a system that produces such deadly results for Alicia and others.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2011
The men and women sat in the jury room in the Anne Arundel County Courthouse, but they weren't jurors. They were the parents of juvenile court defendants, ordered into a new wake-up program on gangs because of what their children may have done. "They twist their fingers around, like this — I can't get my hands into the shapes they make," said Deputy Sheriff Greg Kies, contorting his hands as his small audience laughed. "But those are hand signals, and that is a way gang members communicate with each other," he said, as the parents' faces turned somber.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Staff Writer | September 5, 1995
Starting today Baltimore Circuit Judge David B. Mitchell no longer owns the misery in the hallway.Victims next to wrongdoers, children of neglectful parents, bullies and worse who will end up doing life on the installment plan -- they're all in a hallway in the bowels of the Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. Courthouse, waiting for their moment in juvenile court.For the past 11 years, they have been Judge Mitchell's responsibility as the juvenile court's administrative judge. But today, the 50-year-old judge will settle into the world of adult drug users and sellers, with people old enough to make their own bad decisions.
NEWS
By Susan Leviton | December 9, 1990
Torri is 16 years old. Like most 16-year-olds, he has lived all of his life with his parents. Unlike other 16-years-olds, Torri's problems do not involve studying for the SAT exams or who to ask to the prom.Torri has been severely handicapped since birth. He uses a wheelchair and needs constant care and attention. Yet, in many ways, Torri is lucky. Torri's parents have adapted their lives to meet his needs. For 16 years, his mother and father shared the difficult task of caring for their son, helping him bathe, dress, eat, and get in and out of his wheelchair.
NEWS
By Tyrone Richardson and Tyrone Richardson,sun reporter | March 7, 2007
A 16-year-old from Laurel, accused of trying to pull a shotgun on police officers, had his case transferred to juvenile court Monday. After reviewing reports from the state's Department of Juvenile Services and a psychological evaluation, Howard County Circuit Judge Diane O. Leasure granted Joshua A. Alvandi's request to have the juvenile justice system handle the gun, attempted assault and reckless endangerment charges. Alvandi's lawyer, Clarke Ahlers of Columbia, argued that his client would be better served with the help of the juvenile system.
NEWS
September 15, 1994
Nancy Davis Loomis, an Annapolis lawyer, has been appointed as an Anne Arundel County juvenile court master.A graduate of the University of Maryland School of Law, Ms. Loomis will become one of three masters who decide juvenile cases in Anne Arundel County.Ms. Loomis was appointed by the nine Anne Arundel Circuit Court judges at a meeting Monday, Judge Robert Heller Jr., administrative judge, said yesterday.She was one of 24 lawyers who applied for the position, which was left vacant with the appointment July 22 of Essom V. Ricks as a District judge.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
An attorney for a Howard County teenager accused of conspiring to kill her father said in court Wednesday that the girl was manipulated by her older boyfriend and that it would be unjust to try her as an adult. Prosecutors, though, say lawyers for 16-year-old Morgan Lane Arnold have put on a performance for the court, placing stuffed animals on the defense table as props to make the girl appear more childlike than she is. "It's a show," said prosecutor Danielle Duclaux. Arnold is currently charged as an adult with first-degree murder in the May 2013 death of her father, businessman and community blogger Dennis Lane, who lived in Ellicott City.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2014
Morgan Lane Arnold's bedroom at her mother's house was painted pink and lilac, with white unicorns prancing in a border that ran along the walls. Even at 14, her mother said, she still believed in unicorns. The room has been repainted recently, the unicorns vanished under layers of pale blue and sea green, and Arnold, at 15, is now an adult in the eyes of the law. She is charged with first-degree murder and four other counts in the stabbing last year of her father, prominent Howard County businessman and blogger Dennis Lane.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2014
A Harford County teenager admitted to a judge Wednesday that he shot and killed his father, an act he told police was motivated by years of abuse at the hands of a man who treated him like he "was his slave. " Robert C. Richardson III, now 18, pleaded guilty to manslaughter and a handgun allegation as part of a deal with prosecutors, who dropped more serious charges in the 2012 death of Robert C. Richardson Jr. — a case that both sides said shows people must act when they suspect a child is being mistreated.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2013
A 14-year-old girl and her 19-year-old boyfriend arrested in the killing of her father in his Ellicott City home this month were indicted and charged as adults by a grand jury this week, according to court records. Morgan Arnold, a Mount Hebron High School freshman, now faces two counts of solicitation of murder for allegedly asking her boyfriend, Jason Bulmer, to kill her father, Dennis Lane, and Lane's fiancee, Denise Geiger, according to her indictment. Both Arnold and Bulmer, a Mount Hebron sophomore, are charged with first-degree murder in Lane's killing, and both are charged with two counts of conspiracy to commit murder for allegedly plotting the deaths of both Lane and Geiger, according to their indictments.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2013
Baltimore County Circuit Judge Robert E. Cahill Jr. said Thursday that he will rule next week on whether Robert W. Gladden Jr., the teenager accused in the Perry Hall High School shooting, will be tried as an adult or a juvenile. In a separate court proceeding Thursday, Gladden's mother's live-in boyfriend, Andrew Piper, pleaded guilty to one count of illegal possession of a regulated firearm. After the shooting at the school, county police and officials with the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives searched Gladden's mother's home, where they found several rifles and a handgun belonging to Piper.
NEWS
By Justin George and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2012
Two men, both 19, walked into a Baltimore hospital Thursday night with gunshot wounds. Police who responded to the hospital about 9:41 p.m. quickly determined both had been shot in the 5300 block of Lantern Court in the city's Westgate neighborhood, police said. Officers were actually on the scene, investigating reports of shots fired, when they were called to an area hospital. One victim was shot in the legs and the other sustained a graze wound to the arm. Baltimore police Det. Vernon Davis described the wounds as minor.
NEWS
By Tyrone Richardson and Tyrone Richardson,sun reporter | March 14, 2007
A hearing to move the case of a Columbia 16-year-old, accused of fatally shooting another teen during a fight last summer, to juvenile court has been postponed. The Howard County Circuit Court hearing, scheduled Monday, was postponed to April 27 because of a potential conflict of interest involving an investigator from the state's Department of Juvenile Services who was assigned to write a report, according to the postponement request filed by Joseph Murtha, defense attorney for Monti Mantrice Fleming.
NEWS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2010
A two-time state wrestling champion and star quarterback who was arrested last month for assaulting another North County High School student is set to be tried in December in Baltimore on two previous incidents that also resulted in assault charges. According to police, James Patrick Downey III of Linthicum Heights assaulted Connor M. Little in a parking lot near M&T Bank Stadium in November 2009 while they were attending the annual "Turkey Bowl" football game between Calvert Hall and Loyola.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | May 2, 2012
Three children - an 8-year-old boy and two 9-year-old girls - who police took out of their elementary school in handcuffs earlier this year had hearings before a juvenile judge on Tuesday. They had been charged with aggravated assault, accused of vicious playground attacks in Southwest Baltimore. But while the allegations were well published, driven by the ages of the children and where they were arrested, at a school in Southwest Baltimore's Morrell Park, what is happening to them now is shrouded in the secrecy of the juvenile justice system.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2012
Two city youths charged with fatally shooting a 13-year-old girl in the chest and then hiding her body under a pile of trash in an East Baltimore alley admitted to their respective roles in the killing Tuesday afternoon in juvenile court. A 13-year-old boy tendered an admission — the juvenile court equivalent of a guilty plea — to a charge of involuntary manslaughter for accidentally shooting Monae Turnage in March. A 12-year-old friend admitted to being an accessory to the crime for helping move her body.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.