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Juvenile Arrests

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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | April 17, 1994
Statistics from the Sykesville Police Department show an increase in juvenile arrests, assaults and speeding citations in 1993.The report, issued last week, detailed a 33 percent decrease in adult arrests and a 267 percent increase in the number of juveniles arrested by the six-member town force.Most juvenile offenses involved malicious destruction, vandalism and mischievous crimes, said Officer Onas W. Jansen III."One or two juveniles in particular are responsible for about a quarter of those arrests," said Officer Jansen, who has been on the job for nearly a year.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 8, 2014
The following is compiled from police reports. The Columbia Flier includes descriptions of perpetrators only when the description makes identification possible. East Columbia Lambskin Lane, 8900 block, 5:49 p.m. April 6. Two victims playing basketball when four nearby people began beating one victim. Victims attempted to leave and dropped a cellphone, picked up by assailant. Second victim punched, phone stolen. Four unidentified juveniles arrested and charged with robbery, assault and theft.
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NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2001
The number of reported robberies and auto thefts in Howard County declined sharply last year while the number of juvenile arrests jumped significantly, according to year-end crime statistics released by county police yesterday. Robberies decreased by 30 percent and car thefts by 32 percent between 1999 and last year, police said. Juvenile arrests increased by nearly 24 percent during the same period. Overall, the crime rate in the county remained fairly static, even as the population in the county continued to grow, police said.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
A juvenile suspect was arrested Monday on suspicion of raping an 11-year-old girl in the 1900 block of E. Pratt St. earlier this month, Baltimore police said. The suspect was charged with second-degree rape; second-, third- and fourth-degree sex offenses; second-degree assault; and false imprisonment, police said. The incident took place on Nov. 3, police said. cmcampbell@baltsun.com twitter.com/cmcampbell6
NEWS
October 6, 1998
RECENTLY released statistics on juvenile arrests look lik progress, but it's far too early to declare victory.The state's 7 percent reduction in juvenile arrests for violent crime from 1996 to 1997 is an indicator that doesn't tell us about crimes committed by teens who have not been taken into police custody for their misdeeds.Moreover, the juvenile justice system is in no danger of going out of business.Still, the results look impressive: Juvenile arrests in connection with serious crimes -- murder, robbery, rape and aggravated assault -- were down substantially.
NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,Sun Staff Writer | September 30, 1994
Howard County police and prosecutors say juvenile crime is soaring, with arrests this year already surpassing the total for 1993.And authorities don't expect the numbers to get any better."
NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,SUN STAFF | March 22, 1996
The Howard County Police Department has formed a new youth mentoring program to help curb the county's continuing problem with juvenile crime.The program, Cops As Peers (CAP), pairs volunteer police officers with youths in need of positive role models. Many of the children are identified by teachers or by officers during their trips through neighborhoods, said Sgt. Rick Maltz, a coordinator of the program."We're trying to make a difference in tomorrow one day at a time," Sergeant Maltz said.
NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,Sun Staff Writer | September 30, 1994
Howard County police and prosecutors say juvenile crime is soaring, with arrests this year already surpassing the total for 1993.And authorities don't expect the numbers to get any better."
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2004
Homicides and property crimes in Howard County have hit their lowest levels in five years, but juvenile violent-crime arrests have continued to climb, according to police statistics released yesterday. The county has had one homicide since Jan. 1, compared with six for the same period last year, according to statistics for the first nine months of the year. Fewer property crimes occurred in all categories - burglary, theft and stolen automobiles - that led to an overall decline of 2.3 percent through September.
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane and Gregory P. Kane,Sun Staff Writer | May 19, 1995
Car thefts in Anne Arundel County soared in the first three months of 1995, spurring a 17.4 percent increase in property crimes that county police say was caused mainly by juveniles.Police had long suspected a link between the rise in property crimes and juvenile arrests, said Officer Randy Bell, department spokesman."We took a look at the juvenile arrests, and lo and behold, there it was, juvenile arrests up in a number of categories," Officer Bell said.Juveniles, alone or in small groups, were responsible for a 24.4 percent increase in vandalism, police said.
EXPLORE
March 11, 2013
The following is compiled from local police reports. Our policy is to include descriptions when there is enough information to make identification possible. If you have any information about these crimes, call the Wilkens Police Station at 410-887-0872. Virginia Avenue, 2500 block, between 2:30 p.m., March 7, and 11 a.m. March 8. Cash stolen after front door forced open. Lakebrook Circle, 2900 block, between 1 p.m. and 4:30 p.m., March 7. Laptop stolen from unlocked residence.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2012
Two juveniles were arrested in the burning of a wooden cross in the driveway of a Westminster home late Sunday night, according to the Carroll County Sheriff's Office. Detectives and representatives of the Fire Marshall's Office responded to the 500 block of Ravenshead Run Road just after 11 p.m., when the burned religious symbol was found, the sheriff's office said. Meanwhile, sheriff's deputies were conducting an investigation in the area for a separate call and were able to identify and locate two juvenile suspects in the cross burning, the sheriff's office said.
NEWS
By Bernard C. “Jack” Young | October 7, 2012
With plenty of evidence to refute the need to spend millions to build a jail for juveniles, it would not be far-fetched to expect Gov. Martin O'Malley to instead focus his attention - and our state's precious resources - on projects that prevent youth from engaging in crime. Sadly, that would be a mistake. Recently, Governor O'Malley decided to double-down on the misguided plan to spend more than $70 million building a youth detention facility in Baltimore that studies show is not needed and could ultimately end up being a colossal waste of taxpayer funds.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Justin Fenton | January 3, 2012
Over the weekend, the arrest of a 19-year-old man on a handgun charge caught my eye. His name? Omar Little. That of course is the name of the iconic stick-up man from "The Wire," a show that was based heavily on real people and events from Baltimore's crime history. Though the Omar character  was said to be based on several people - Shorty Boyd, Donnie Andrews, Ferdinand Harvin, Billy Outlaw and Anthony Hollie - none of them were actually named "Omar Little. "  I reached out to the show creator and former Sun reporter David Simon to see whether there was, in fact, an Omar Little who Simon or his writing partners had come across and used as the namesake for the character.
NEWS
May 22, 2011
Four juveniles were arrested Saturday night after running through the Inner Harbor and reportedly causing a disturbance. Baltimore police were called at about 9:40 p.m. The youths' ages were unknown, police said. — By Raven L. Hill
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2011
Baltimore County police said a male juvenile was arrested for trespassing near Towson Town Center about 9 p.m. Saturday. The juvenile was taken to the Towson precinct and charged, according to police. In a separate incident, David Keating, a spokesman for General Growth Properties, the owner of the mall, said a group of 10 to 12 girls "apparently got into some kind of verbal confrontation. " "Our security approached them at that point and they left the mall," he said. Earlier versions of this article incorrectly reported that a person was arrested after a "disturbance" at Towson Town Center.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2010
First-time juvenile offenders in Annapolis will be offered an alternative to a juvenile record with the start of a new program offered by police. The Juvenile Offenders in Need of Supervision Program, or JOINS, will give first-time offenders under the age of 18, who admit to minor crimes and agree to enter into the 90-day program, a chance to expunge their record, if the victim agrees. "It's for those kids that you can work with and give the right attention to. They need to be given a second chance," said Det. Shelley White, director of the program.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2004
Howard County had 23 more violent crimes and 106 more property crimes in the first three months of this year than in the same period last year, according to police statistics released yesterday. But data showed that last year, the county's overall crime rate was at its lowest level in nearly 30 years: 2,870 per 100,000 residents. Police were pleased with the dropping crime rate, particularly in light of the county's increasing population, said Sherry Llewellyn, a police spokeswoman. She said longer-term studies help the police identify trends, while the department tries not to read too much into statistics from shorter periods.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2010
Police have arrested two juveniles in a series of robberies and carjackings in the Remington and Charles Village areas. After receiving reports of a rash of incidents in recent weeks and recovering a stolen car on Exeter Hall Avenue, the Regional Auto Theft Task Force began paying closer attention to the area, said Anthony Guglielmi, the department's chief spokesman. Task force members located two more stolen vehicles and arrested two juveniles, one of whom confessed to several of the crimes, Guglielmi said.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2010
First-time juvenile offenders in Annapolis will be offered an alternative to a juvenile record with the start of a new program offered by police. The Juvenile Offenders in Need of Supervision Program, or JOINS, will give first-time offenders under the age of 18, who admit to minor crimes and agree to enter into the 90-day program, a chance to expunge their record, if the victim agrees. "It's for those kids that you can work with and give the right attention to. They need to be given a second chance," said Det. Shelley White, director of the program.
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