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By David G. Savage, Tribune Newspapers | May 18, 2010
— The Supreme Court set an apparent blueprint Monday for upholding recently enacted health care changes and its national mandate that all Americans have insurance, saying Congress has a "broad authority" to pass laws that are "rationally related" to carrying out its constitutional aims. The Constitution not only gives Congress the power to regulate interstate commerce, the justices said, but also the authority to enact all laws that are "necessary and proper" to carrying out this authority.
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NEWS
Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
The U.S. Department of Justice will conduct a civil rights investigation into allegations of brutality and misconduct by the Baltimore Police Department, Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts announced Friday. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Batts requested the probe after a six-month investigation by The Baltimore Sun found city residents have suffered battered faces and broken bones during arrests . The city has paid $5.7 million in court judgments and settlements in 102 cases since 2011, and nearly all of the people who received payouts were cleared of criminal charges, according to the investigation published this week.
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NEWS
September 30, 2011
Whether one supports or opposes President Barack Obama's health care reform law, the administration's choice not to prolong the appeals in the legal challenges to the act and to move the matter to the Supreme Court for review in the upcoming term should be welcome news. Much is at stake in the debate, and advocates and foes alike have now had an adequate opportunity to generate their arguments. Naturally, last week's decision generated endless speculation inside the Capitol Beltway about the political implications of a possible Supreme Court ruling next June in the midst of a presidential election campaign.
NEWS
By Bernard C. "Jack" Young | October 3, 2014
As I view the constant protesting by residents of Ferguson, Mo., nearly two months after a police officer fatally shot an unarmed teenager, I know that it's only a matter of time before the streets of Baltimore are filled with the same sustained clarion call for justice that has rocked the once inconspicuous Midwestern city. On the surface, the city of Baltimore and Ferguson are worlds apart. With a population nearly 30 times larger than Ferguson, Baltimore is a major American city and cultural hub. From Francis Scott Key to H.L. Mencken to Thurgood Marshall, Baltimore has produced more than its fair share of American icons.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 9, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Peeking out from behind the black-robed decorum of a Supreme Court hearing yesterday were vivid hints that the justices are attracted to the striptease -- as a constitutional idea, that is.Ordinarily, the justices seldom expose their leanings on a constitutional issue during a hearing, but they seemed to have real difficulty this time concealing the apparent view that nude dancing -- when done before paying customers -- will go on enjoying constitutional...
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | March 9, 2005
FOUR INMATES were stabbed at the House of Corrections Annex in Jessup last month. Acting on a hunch that this might have been inappropriate conduct, prison officials instituted a one-month lockdown in which 1,200 inmates were confined to their cells. Now there's a Supreme Court case waiting to happen if ever I heard of one. You can imagine the scenario: One or several inmates, bristling that they have to be locked down because of the actions of a few dimwits, start to complain. "Hey, we didn't stab anybody.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | December 23, 2003
CHICAGO -- There have been lots of important court decisions in recent days, but not from the Supreme Court -- and you shouldn't expect any in the immediate future. It has already begun its holiday vacation and won't be back until mid-January. After that four-week recess, the court will be in session for two weeks, after which it will break for four weeks, return for three, and then take off the following two. From mid-December until the completion of its term in late June or early July, the court will be in recess for 14 weeks.
NEWS
By WILEY A. HALL | January 12, 1995
First of all, you can't just cruise up to the U.S. Supreme Court and stroll in. Capitol Hill swarms with security: U.S. Secret Service officers, U.S. Park Police, members of the District of Columbia police department.And it seems as though the primary purpose of all those law enforcement officers is to protect the parking privileges of the elite.So I circled Capitol Hill for nearly half an hour yesterday, through a freezing rain, looking for a space. I passed ticketed cars and booted cars and cars being hoisted up and hauled away by parking enforcement tow trucks; when it comes to parking, they play hard ball in our nation's capital.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | July 6, 2003
WHEN I RANG the bell of the Gay and Lesbian Community Center of Baltimore's office in the 200 block of W. Chase St., I got a pleasant surprise. The man who greeted me was Anthony McCarthy, a longtime city activist and publisher of The Gay Life newspaper, former associate publisher of the Baltimore Times and, at one time, the editor of the Baltimore Afro-American. McCarthy and I have served on more than one panel, shared quite a few laughs and just as many insights. We last met a little over a month ago, when he urged a group of high school students gathered at Mount St. Mary's College for a conference of the Hugh O'Brian Youth Foundation not to buy into any government claims about the need for censorship.
NEWS
By Jessica Silbey | May 13, 2007
The Supreme Court recently rendered a decision based on watching a video - and in so doing fell for a trick that has been seducing moviegoers for more than a century. The court's decision in Scott v. Harris holds that a Georgia police officer did not violate a fleeing suspect's Fourth Amendment rights when he caused the suspect's car to crash, rendering the suspect a quadriplegic. The court's decision relies almost entirely on the filmed version of the high-speed police chase. This is not the first time the Supreme Court has acted as film critic in determining the scope of constitutional protection (the justices once routinely viewed obscene films to determine whether they conflicted with "community standards of decency")
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
The U.S. Supreme Court is meeting on Monday for the first time since June, and could make a decision to hear a new same-sex marriage case. On the justices' agenda for the closed-door conference are appeals to cases in Indiana, Oklahoma, Utah, Virginia and Wisconsin, won by gay couples that favor a Supreme Court decision on their lower court victories. Four out of nine justices would have to vote to take up any particular case , and they are under no obligation to do so and could hold off on deciding whether to consider one of the cases until a later conference.
NEWS
John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Sen. Ben Cardin has joined a coalition of civil rights groups in pressing the Obama administration to finish a years-old review of its guidance on racial profiling, an effort supporters say should be a priority following this summer's upheaval in Ferguson, Mo. Justice Department officials are set to expand a 2003 ban on racial profiling for federal agencies, but advocates say the effort has taken too long and they want Attorney General Eric Holder...
NEWS
James O'Conor Gentry Jr | September 2, 2014
As one of two former prosecutors in the 1995 murder trial of then-police Sgt. James Kulbicki (" Ex-Baltimore Police sergeant granted new trial in murder of mistress," Aug. 27), I was outraged and incredulous to learn that the Court of Appeals of Maryland has, for the second time, reversed the conviction of a man who was tied by overwhelming evidence to the senseless and brutal execution of an innocent, young woman more than 19 years ago. Two juries have already found that on January 9, 1993, Gina Nueslein, just 22 years old at the time, was shot in the head by Sgt. Kulbicki for daring to ask him to provide child support for their 18-month old son. Evidence showed the police veteran abducted Nueslein and, as she sat in his pick-up truck, placed the barrel of his gun against her head and pulled the trigger.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
DiJohn Thomas grew up bouncing between foster placements in Baltimore, never knowing how his peers, the next foster parents or staff at his next group home would respond to his being gay. Sometimes the adults responded negatively, he said, and his peers with their fists. "I've never been homeless to the point where I had to sleep outside, but there were times when I would leave group homes and wouldn't have anywhere to go but to a friend's house, sleeping on a couch," said Thomas, who is now 21 and first entered the foster system at age 6. "Most of the time, I would fight or people wouldn't like me just because they knew I was gay. " Advocates for the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community say Thomas's experiences are all too common.
NEWS
August 4, 2014
I am disgusted by the not guilty verdict rendered in the case of New Jersey detective Joseph Walker, who shot and killed Joseph Harvey Jr. last year ( "N.J. officer not guilty of murder in Arundel road rage shooting," July 30). Clearly, Maryland law was not adhered to in this case. Mr. Walker is a detective in New Jersey. He was in Maryland attending a relative's birthday party with his family, so clearly he was not here on official business. Why was he carrying his gun? He was out of his jurisdiction and off-duty.
NEWS
July 22, 2014
In a letter in the Sun, Kelli Kirchner of Cumberland expresses her happiness with the Supreme Court's Hobby Lobby decision and seems to believe no one should question or try to change it ( "Why is Mikulski trying to 'fix' the Supreme Court decision?" July 20). Well, I have news for her. As long as we have freedom of speech (as protected by the First Amendment to the Constitution), we will always be free to question and try to change (via legislation or constitutional amendment) any decision of any court.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | July 20, 2001
WASHINGTON - When former Mayor Marion Barry regained his old job in spite of having served time for a drug bust, his memorably conciliatory observation to unhappy D.C. residents was: "Get over it!" That, essentially, continues to be the attitude of the Bush White House and supporters toward the recurring re-examinations of the Florida voting fiasco and the Supreme Court anointing that put George W. Bush in the Oval Office. As Bush spokesman Ari Fleischer said, "This election was decided by the voters of Florida a long time ago, and the nation, the president and all but the most partisan Americans have moved on."
NEWS
By Paul D. Carrington | April 7, 2009
It is often said that Supreme Court justices have "life tenure" - a term used elsewhere to describe royalty. Our justices serve as long as they like - regardless of infirmity, fatigue or diminished ability. Moreover, the court has evolved into a "super legislature" where justices interpret laws to reflect their political preferences, with little regard for the expressed intent of Congress. Our Supreme Court is in serious need of reform. First, if a designated panel of senior appellate judges discerns that a justice is disabled, he or she should be given the choice of retiring at full pay or facing a public hearing on the issue.
NEWS
Justin George and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
Friends say Mia Henderson had only recently moved back to Baltimore when she became the victim of a homicide this week in Northwest Baltimore. Henderson was found in a Hanlon-Longwood neighborhood alley early Wednesday, killed by "severe trauma," police said. Henderson's brother, Reggie Bullock, is a shooting guard for the Los Angeles Clippers, and her death became national and international news Thursday in part because of that connection. Police say the killing of Henderson, 26, a transgender woman, bears similarities to the killing of another transgender woman named Kandy Hall, 40, about a month ago in Northeast Baltimore.
NEWS
June 3, 2014
Your editorial urging Edward Snowden to return and face the consequences of his civil disobedience would have been appropriate as recently as 15 years ago ( "Snowden speaks," May 30). Back then, there was a country called the United States of America that did not practice torture, conduct secret trials, detain suspects indefinitely and execute citizens without trial. Unfortunately, if you want Mr. Snowden to return to that country, you'll have to provide him with a time machine.
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