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By Aaron Epstein and Aaron Epstein,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 16, 2002
WASHINGTON - Former Supreme Court Justice Byron Raymond White, who lived two American dreams by gaining national fame on the football field and reaching the pinnacle of the legal profession, died yesterday in Denver of complications from pneumonia. He was 84. President John F. Kennedy, who appointed Justice White to the nation's highest court, once said he "excelled in everything he had attempted" - and Mr. Kennedy was right. Among his achievements, Justice White was a Rhodes scholar, decorated war veteran and honors graduate of Yale Law School.
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NEWS
By Robert V. Percival | May 9, 2014
The legal blogosphere was buzzing last month with the discovery of a major gaffe in a Supreme Court decision that had just been released. What attracted all the attention was not so much the substance of the error - misrepresenting the position of the Environmental Protection Agency in a case decided in 2001 - but its source: Justice Antonin Scalia, the author of the court's decision in the 2001 case. I know from personal experience, mistakes can happen, even at the highest court of the land.
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NEWS
By Lyle Denniston TTC and Lyle Denniston TTC,Washington Bureau | March 20, 1993
WASHINGTON -- For 31 years, Byron R. White has cast votes on the Supreme Court that have proved, day after day, that presidents should not expect anything in return when they name a justice.A brainy and crusty conservative put on the court by one of history's most liberal presidents, John F. Kennedy, Justice White has fit quite well -- comfortably, even -- into the rightward turn of the court over the past generation.His streak of independence helped gain him a reputation among some as a maverick, an unpredictable justice.
NEWS
May 3, 2004
Joseph F. Cullman III, 92, the Philip Morris executive who became the cigarette industrys chief defender against the anti-tobacco movement, died Friday at a New York City hospital. Mr. Cullman, who smoked for many years but eventually quit, retired as chairman and chief executive in 1978, but for years remained as chairman emeritus, lobbying legislators and defending cigarettes at congressional hearings. In 1971, when the government banned cigarette advertising on television, he said in an interview: I do not believe that cigarettes are hazardous to ones health.
NEWS
July 4, 1993
What may be the last term of the Supreme Court's "conservative reaction era" ended with a goodbye and a flourish last month. The goodbye was to Justice Byron White, who retired after 31 years on the court. The flourish was a couple of reactionary decisions that upset many precedents -- including fairly recent ones, not just old ones of the liberal Warren Court of the 1960s.Byron White was the last survivor of Chief Justice Earl Warren's court. A John Kennedy appointee, he moved right and became a member of the conservative bloc on the court.
NEWS
June 2, 1991
In 1984, Robert McCormick, a West Virginia legislator runnin for re-election, told the lobbyist for a group of foreign doctors seeking a change in licensing laws that he had "heard nothing from" them, and reminded the lobbyist that he had helped them in the past and had planned to do so in the future. They got the message and he got a contribution.He was charged with extortion and convicted. Last month, the Supreme Court threw out the conviction. Justice Byron White said, "Serving constituents and supporting legislation that will benefit the district and individuals and groups therein is the everyday business of a legislator.
NEWS
April 1, 1991
The Supreme Court's 5-4 decision last week saying that coerced confessions may be used in some criminal trials is shocking proof that the Reagan-Bush Supreme Court is not conservative but reactionary. In the field of criminal justice it has now turned the clock back over 50 years or nearly 100 years, depending on how you look at it.In 1897, the court ruled that in federal criminal trials, coerced confessions were forbidden by the Fifth Amendment. In 1936, it said the Fourteenth Amendment extended that prohibition to state trials.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 27, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court, breaking with nearly a half-century of precedent, ruled 5-4 yesterday that criminal convictions based partly on a confession forced out of the suspect do not always have to be thrown out.A coerced confession, the majority declared, may be treated as merely a "harmless error" if there was enough other evidence at the trial to convict the accused person anyway.That result contrasted with a line of decisions, going back perhaps to 1945, that had declared that any time a jury heard about a confession that was coerced, the guilty verdict could not stand -- no matter how strong any other proof of the crime had been.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Carl M. Cannon and Lyle Denniston and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau | March 31, 1993
WASHINGTON -- White House officials are actively floating the name of New York Gov. Mario M. Cuomo as a potential nominee for the Supreme Court in an apparent attempt to get the reaction of official Washington and special-interest groups.The effort does not signal that Mr. Cuomo definitely will be the nominee, or that he is necessarily at the top of any official list, or even that the list of possible nominees is final, a White House official conceded."I don't have the sense that they are hot and heavy in the pursuit right now," one outside adviser said of the search for a new justice.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | October 5, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court starts a new term today awash in politics -- some presidential, some judicial -- and with its future membership more uncertain than at any time in years.The presidential election less than a month from now may well have a direct impact on the plans of at least three members of the court about the timing of their decisions -- now on hold -- to retire from the court.Future appointments to the court have become an active, if not dominant campaign issue between President Bush and Democrat Bill Clinton -- but the winner of the White House could make no appointments unless there are departures from the court.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 12, 2003
WASHINGTON - In its decision to accept the Guantanamo Bay prisoners' appeals despite the Bush administration's objections, the Supreme Court brushed past the "judges keep out" fence the administration had tried to erect around its open-ended detention policy. No matter how the court rules, that action alone might come to define a singular moment in the relationship between the White House and the Supreme Court, two inherently powerful institutions that for the past several years have been in alpha mode, intent on exercising their power to the maximum extent.
NEWS
By Aaron Epstein and Aaron Epstein,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 16, 2002
WASHINGTON - Former Supreme Court Justice Byron Raymond White, who lived two American dreams by gaining national fame on the football field and reaching the pinnacle of the legal profession, died yesterday in Denver of complications from pneumonia. He was 84. President John F. Kennedy, who appointed Justice White to the nation's highest court, once said he "excelled in everything he had attempted" - and Mr. Kennedy was right. Among his achievements, Justice White was a Rhodes scholar, decorated war veteran and honors graduate of Yale Law School.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | October 5, 1995
LOS ANGELES -- Once again, the United States must pay for its original sin: All men were not created equal in the land of the free. Whether or not an American believes that a black man named O.J. Simpson got away with murder seems to depend pretty much on the race of that American -- as ever.In September of 1831, at a dinner in Boston, Alexis de Tocqueville, a young French magistrate who would go back home to write his classic book ''Democracy in America,'' was seated next to former president John Quincy Adams and asked the old man: ''Do you look on slavery as a great plague for the United States?
NEWS
July 4, 1993
What may be the last term of the Supreme Court's "conservative reaction era" ended with a goodbye and a flourish last month. The goodbye was to Justice Byron White, who retired after 31 years on the court. The flourish was a couple of reactionary decisions that upset many precedents -- including fairly recent ones, not just old ones of the liberal Warren Court of the 1960s.Byron White was the last survivor of Chief Justice Earl Warren's court. A John Kennedy appointee, he moved right and became a member of the conservative bloc on the court.
NEWS
By JAMES J. KILPATRICK | June 30, 1993
Washington. -- As usual, the end-of-term fireworks were spectacular. By the time the Supreme Court shut down for the summer Monday, tempers were publicly flaring on the bench. Cases were exploding with skyrocket bursts of multiple opinions. It was time to go home.The term that began in October produced opinions in 115 cases, down a little from the average of recent years. The final week brought several opinions of substantial significance, notably in property rights and civil rights. These cases will provide abundant material for comment as the summer rolls on.For today, let me say something about the high court's regrettable trend toward turning its decisions into scrambled eggs.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Carl M. Cannon and Lyle Denniston and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau | March 31, 1993
WASHINGTON -- White House officials are actively floating the name of New York Gov. Mario M. Cuomo as a potential nominee for the Supreme Court in an apparent attempt to get the reaction of official Washington and special-interest groups.The effort does not signal that Mr. Cuomo definitely will be the nominee, or that he is necessarily at the top of any official list, or even that the list of possible nominees is final, a White House official conceded."I don't have the sense that they are hot and heavy in the pursuit right now," one outside adviser said of the search for a new justice.
NEWS
By Robert V. Percival | May 9, 2014
The legal blogosphere was buzzing last month with the discovery of a major gaffe in a Supreme Court decision that had just been released. What attracted all the attention was not so much the substance of the error - misrepresenting the position of the Environmental Protection Agency in a case decided in 2001 - but its source: Justice Antonin Scalia, the author of the court's decision in the 2001 case. I know from personal experience, mistakes can happen, even at the highest court of the land.
NEWS
May 3, 2004
Joseph F. Cullman III, 92, the Philip Morris executive who became the cigarette industrys chief defender against the anti-tobacco movement, died Friday at a New York City hospital. Mr. Cullman, who smoked for many years but eventually quit, retired as chairman and chief executive in 1978, but for years remained as chairman emeritus, lobbying legislators and defending cigarettes at congressional hearings. In 1971, when the government banned cigarette advertising on television, he said in an interview: I do not believe that cigarettes are hazardous to ones health.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | March 26, 1993
WASHINGTON -- At first blush, it would appear that conservative Supreme Court Justice Byron R. White's decision to retire means the long controversy over abortion rights will at last be shunted to the sidelines, with President Clinton expected to fill the vacancy with a pro-choice nominee.The president in his news conference the other day said he wouldn't ask any nominee how he or she would vote on a particular issue. But he made clear he would want him or her to be a strong protector of the individual's rights of privacy.
NEWS
March 21, 1993
Supreme Court Justice Byron R. White told President Clinton on Friday he will retire at the end of this term. This ends a chapter in an interesting American life. Justice White was a college and pro football star. A Rhodes scholar. After Navy service in the South Pacific in World War II, private law practice in his native Colorado and campaign duty for John F. Kennedy in 1960, he became deputy attorney general, then associate justice.On the court he was known as a conservative, but moderate is more like it, looking at his record overall.
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