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Justice Thurgood Marshall

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By WILEY HALL | July 4, 1991
Until today, I've tried to hold myself aloof from the Great Stadium Controversy.There is famine in North Africa, riot and mayhem in EasternEurope. The Brazilian rain forest is disappearing and now they tell me the sun has spots.Somehow, with all of that going on, what we call the new baseball stadium at Camden Yards didn't seem all that important.Besides, none of the proposed names seemed good enough.Until now.Tuesday, Evening Sun sports columnist Milton Kent suggested we name the stadium after retiring Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2013
As a long-haired teen growing up in the 1960s, Jim McCullough had little clue what he wanted to do with his life, but two things did stir him: He hated the way some people in Laurel, his hometown, looked down on his African-American friends, and he loved using the wood lathe in shop class. He has traded the hippie locks for a grandfather's trim goatee. He long ago gained renown in the region as a master furniture craftsman, at times for his work on pieces used by government officials from presidents to attorneys general.
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NEWS
By Washington Bureau | January 26, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court arranged yesterday a special tribute to Justice Thurgood Marshall.His casket will be available for viewing in the court's cavernous Great Hall throughout the day tomorrow. The only other justice to be honored in this way was Chief Justice Earl Warren, a court spokesman said.Mr. Marshall, 84, the nation's first black justice and a celebrated civil rights lawyer earlier in his career, died Sunday afternoon.The public viewing of his casket will be followed by public funeral services at 11 a.m. Thursday at the National Cathedral.
NEWS
By Sherrilyn A. Ifill | May 4, 2009
In the book The Nine: Inside the Secret World of the Supreme Court, Jeffrey Toobin wrote that Justice David Souter wept after the Supreme Court's nakedly political, legally indefensible and bitterly divided decision in Bush v. Gore. And apparently it's been downhill from there. In his 18 years on the court, Mr. Souter has proved himself to be quite brilliant, and of course he became the stealth nominee who didn't turn out quite the way President George H.W. Bush's handlers expected. In fact, Mr. Souter emerged as one of the strongest and most principled moderate voices on the court (don't let anybody fool you - there are no real liberals on this court)
FEATURES
By Susan Baer | April 7, 1991
When a screening of "Separate But Equal" was held at the American Film Institute in Washington several weeks ago, the film's central character, NAACP counsel-turned-Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, was among the dignitaries in the audience.Although his presence alone at this event was most atypical, the 82-year-old justice, surrounded by family and friends, responded questions about the film with typical judicious restraint.A phone call to his chambers last week drew similar reticence.
NEWS
By Washington Bureau | January 27, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The bier first used for the state funeral of the president who freed the slaves, Abraham Lincoln, will be put back into ceremonial use today for the great-grandson of a slave, Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall.The black-draped "Lincoln Catafalque," rebuilt yesterday by the court's carpentry shop, will hold the Marshall casket in the court's Great Hall as the public pays tribute, from 10:30 this morning until 9 tonight.The casket will arrive at the court's front steps at 9:25 a.m., as an expected crowd of spectators lines up along the edge of the court's plaza.
NEWS
By ALISA SAMUELS and ALISA SAMUELS,SUN STAFF | May 13, 1996
George Veasey Parkhurst, the court auditor for Baltimore City Circuit Court who was proud to be admitted to the Maryland bar on the same day as the late U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, died Friday at Union Memorial Hospital of post-operative heart and lung complications after a fall. He was 88.Mr. Parkhurst, a Roland Park resident, was appointed court auditor in 1965 and served until his death. Earlier, he practiced corporate, real estate and probate law at his father's firm in Baltimore.
NEWS
July 2, 1991
"Only in America," said Clarence Thomas as he accepted President Bush's nomination yesterday for the U.S. Supreme Court, could a black person who was born in the segregated South come so far in life as he has come.And indeed that's true. But it is equally true that Thomas came so far as a direct result of the Herculean legal labors of the man he hopes to succeed, Justice Thurgood Marshall, who, as a lawyer, persuaded the Supreme Court to break down the walls which for centuries kept children like Clarence Thomas from realizing their full potential as American citizens.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 27, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The librarian of Congress is strongly defended his actions in opening to the public the private papers of the late Justice Thurgood Marshall, saying that he acted on the explicit instructions of Mr. Marshall and that the papers would continue to be available."
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 5, 1991
WASHINGTON -- At $153,600 a year, Clarence Thomas surely is Washington's most overpaid secretary, messenger and doorkeeper. But that is not all he does to earn that kind of money.Justice Thomas, of course, sits on the Supreme Court, and the six-figure salary is that high primarily to pay him for doing judge's work.But as the junior justice, he does more for his money than seven of his colleagues -- all but Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist, who gets an extra $7,000 a year for the special jobs that go with being the chief.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | September 18, 2002
SO MANY TOPICS, so little space. What's a columnist to do? Devote as many paragraphs as possible to each. So here goes. Let's start off with some kudos. 1. To Earl El-Amin, who used Sept. 11 to continue the work that the Muslim American Society has been doing for years, long before the terrorist attacks took place. Forget what you've heard for the past year about Islam being "the enemy" or a religion that nurtures fanaticism. El-Amin handed out certificates of appreciation to Maj. Russell Shea, commander of the Baltimore Police Department's Southwestern District; the Rev. Damien Nalepa, who was representing Cardinal William H. Keeler; Capt.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 2, 2000
WASHINGTON - Inside the Supreme Court's imposing courtroom yesterday, the air was festive - for a while. A lot of handshakes, a lot of politicians and assorted Washington luminaries, including Vice President Al Gore's children, in very choice seats. Lawyers and journalists stood next to their seats, gawking to see who was there. Everyone quickly sighted retired Justice Byron R. White and the late Justice Thurgood Marshall's son, Thurgood, an aide to Gore. For the hour and a half it took to fill the courtroom, the gathering seemed far more political than judicial.
FEATURES
By M. DION THOMPSON and M. DION THOMPSON,SUN STAFF | November 3, 1998
The man answering the door at 1632 Division St. is not pleased. Just moments earlier he was enjoying his afternoon meal. Now someone is on his steps, asking questions about the plaque that says Thurgood Marshall lived here."
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | December 15, 1996
Uncle Tom. Lawn jockey. Traitor. Sellout. Handkerchief-head.Those are just a few of the terms black folks have used to describe Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas. If Thomas is all those things, what exactly does that make the late Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, who passed on information about civil rights leader Robert F. Williams to the FBI?The word everyone is trying so hard not to say about Marshall is "fink." When USA Today revealed that recently released FBI files showed Marshall had a part-time job as a snitch, the entire "bash Thomas" brigade in the nation's black liberal leadership experienced en masse vocal-cord arrest.
NEWS
By ALISA SAMUELS and ALISA SAMUELS,SUN STAFF | May 13, 1996
George Veasey Parkhurst, the court auditor for Baltimore City Circuit Court who was proud to be admitted to the Maryland bar on the same day as the late U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, died Friday at Union Memorial Hospital of post-operative heart and lung complications after a fall. He was 88.Mr. Parkhurst, a Roland Park resident, was appointed court auditor in 1965 and served until his death. Earlier, he practiced corporate, real estate and probate law at his father's firm in Baltimore.
NEWS
By LYLE DENNISTON and LYLE DENNISTON,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 1, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Sandra Day O'Connor, a woman of global reputation and a member of America's power elite, remains mostly a stranger in her own land.The first woman justice on the Supreme Court, and now a thoroughly familiar symbol of the achieving woman, she is often the center of attention at glittering Washington social gatherings. She also is an active public speaker. And yet, she is among the capital city's most remote celebrities.The public sometimes remembers her celebrity, sometimes forgets it: She was on the Gallup Organization's "most admired women" list for the first five years she was a justice, beginning in 1981, but appeared only intermittently after that: in 1989 and 1991, and not since.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 2, 2000
WASHINGTON - Inside the Supreme Court's imposing courtroom yesterday, the air was festive - for a while. A lot of handshakes, a lot of politicians and assorted Washington luminaries, including Vice President Al Gore's children, in very choice seats. Lawyers and journalists stood next to their seats, gawking to see who was there. Everyone quickly sighted retired Justice Byron R. White and the late Justice Thurgood Marshall's son, Thurgood, an aide to Gore. For the hour and a half it took to fill the courtroom, the gathering seemed far more political than judicial.
NEWS
By LYLE DENNISTON and LYLE DENNISTON,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 1, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Sandra Day O'Connor, a woman of global reputation and a member of America's power elite, remains mostly a stranger in her own land.The first woman justice on the Supreme Court, and now a thoroughly familiar symbol of the achieving woman, she is often the center of attention at glittering Washington social gatherings. She also is an active public speaker. And yet, she is among the capital city's most remote celebrities.The public sometimes remembers her celebrity, sometimes forgets it: She was on the Gallup Organization's "most admired women" list for the first five years she was a justice, beginning in 1981, but appeared only intermittently after that: in 1989 and 1991, and not since.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 27, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The librarian of Congress is strongly defended his actions in opening to the public the private papers of the late Justice Thurgood Marshall, saying that he acted on the explicit instructions of Mr. Marshall and that the papers would continue to be available."
NEWS
By Washington Bureau | January 27, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The bier first used for the state funeral of the president who freed the slaves, Abraham Lincoln, will be put back into ceremonial use today for the great-grandson of a slave, Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall.The black-draped "Lincoln Catafalque," rebuilt yesterday by the court's carpentry shop, will hold the Marshall casket in the court's Great Hall as the public pays tribute, from 10:30 this morning until 9 tonight.The casket will arrive at the court's front steps at 9:25 a.m., as an expected crowd of spectators lines up along the edge of the court's plaza.
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