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NEWS
July 7, 1991
As expected, Justice David Souter voted as a good conservative Republican during his first term on the Supreme Court. On a court that was markedly conservative, Justice Souter voted with the majority 97 times and dissented only five times. To put that in perspective, Justice Thurgood Marshall dissented 25 times.Of 21 5-4 decisions, Justice Souter was in the majority 15 times -- 13 of which he and Chief Justice William Rehnquist, the conservatives' leader, were together. Much of the conservative profile that the newest justice displayed was due to the high number of criminal case opinions this court issued.
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NEWS
May 2, 2009
Should a woman replace Souter? Intheblacklodge: Why does the gender of the appointee make any difference? He should appoint whoever he thinks is best. Dmbfanmd: replace him with a woman? Choosing anyone because of their sex is sexist. FriedBob: Only if she is the most qualified for the position. He shouldn't put a woman on there just to put a woman there. Bryanpatterson: How about the most qualified - why does it always have to be about gender/race/etc.? BaltimoreTom: oprah should replace Souter.
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NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 8, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Pennsylvania got clear permission from Supreme Court Justice David H. Souter late last night to start enforcing its anti-abortion laws, on the bookssince 1988 and 1989 but never put into effect.In a six-page opinion issued about an hour before midnight, Mr. Souter said he thought the state laws might put a burden on women's right to abortion, but he said a federal appeals court in Philadelphia was right in refusing earlier this month to postpone the laws any further.Enforcement of the law, to begin within a few days, is expected to affect about 50,000 women a year in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
By PETER A. BROWN | October 28, 2005
ORLANDO, Fla. -- It isn't often the president of the United States messes up and his political enemies pay the price for his error. But that will be the upshot of Harriet Miers' aborted Supreme Court nomination. It was one conceived to avoid alienating Democrats, but it took Republicans for granted. Because President Bush's poll numbers have been low, he wanted to avoid a bruising Senate confirmation fight by picking someone whose lack of a paper trail or enemies would disarm the opposition.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | July 5, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Two years ago, David Hackett Souter's image was dour, indeed: the bachelor no one knew and ascetic New Englander who lived alone in the woods, quietly reading heavy legal tomes by pale candlelight.After his sophomore year as a Supreme Court justice, however, Mr. Souter already is well on his way to becoming one of the most influential members of that tribunal, regularly displaying the solid capacity of a soon-to-be dominant jurist.He has been observed closely by court analysts because so little was known of him when he was plucked from obscurity to be President Bush's nominee to succeed one of the giants of modern court history, Justice William J. Brennan Jr.Because Mr. Souter is an intensely private person who does not yearn to be conspicuous, even in one of the most powerful and public institutions in Washington, what there has been to observe was his role in court hearings and his opinions.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 8, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Pennsylvania got clear permission from Supreme Court Justice David H. Souter late last night to start enforcing its anti-abortion laws, on the books since 1988 and 1989 but never put into effect.In a six-page opinion issued about an hour before midnight, Justice Souter said he thought the state laws might put a burden on women's right to abortion, but he said a federal appeals court in Philadelphia was right in refusing earlier this month to postpone the laws any further.Enforcement of the law, to begin within a few days, is expected to affect about 50,000 women a year in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
By George Neff Lucas | June 5, 1991
Justice Souter at last leaves no doubtWhat his secretive bent is about:It means even quotin'% The A-word's verbotenWhen women don't know the way out.The stadium-namers must harkTo the recent claim, however stark,That Baltimore's Billie) Was a Lady from Philly --Forget about Holiday Park.The NRA gun-doters hateThe Brady bill's 7-day wait;But their real bugaboo$ Is what we should doBut no doubt never will: confiscate!Frequent flyer Cavazos was coolAbout breaking the bonus miles rule;When a Sec, Education)
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 31, 1990
WASHINGTON -- The newest Supreme Court justice, David H. Souter, finally broke his silence on abortion yesterday, putting on public display some doubts about sweeping government rules forbidding doctors at federally funded clinics from even mentioning the subject.Justice Souter joined several of his colleagues in rigorous questioning of a government lawyer who was trying to defend the controversial "gag rule" imposed on family-planning clinics by the Reagan administration in 1988.At one point, the new justice openly wondered whether the government rule had gone beyond what Congress had authorized -- a conclusion that, if embraced by the court, could scuttle the rule altogether.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 7, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Justice David H. Souter went to th Supreme Court trailing a White House prediction that his selection would be a "home run" for the conservative cause. He )) is proving much of the time -- at least by his votes -- that that isn't necessarily so.So far in his first term -- about a third of the way through the expected decisions -- he has tended to line up most often with Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, who seems increasingly to lead a moderate bloc that often controls outcomes.Of the 40 rulings the court has issued up to this point, 16 stood out as the most important, and Justice Souter voted on 13 of those.
NEWS
July 11, 1994
The Supreme Court term that just ended was the most uneventful in 40 years. It rendered only 84 decisions -- the fewest since the 1956. Few of its decisions were either surprising or likely to be considered landmark. It broke no new ground. If there was one surprise, one important development, it was the foreshadowing of the shape of things to come: a center-left bloc of justices that, while not dominant, could be more influential than any other combination.That bloc was composed of Justices Harry Blackmun, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, David Souter and John Paul Stevens.
NEWS
By CAL THOMAS | October 5, 2005
ARLINGTON, Va. -- Ronald Reagan used a phrase in his dealings with Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev: Trust, but verify. Mr. Reagan's point was that Mr. Gorbachev's words sounded good, but that they must be tested to see if he meant them. That standard should be applied to President Bush's nomination of Harriet Miers to replace Sandra Day O'Connor on the Supreme Court. The reason verification has special relevance to the Miers nomination is that like Ms. Miers, Justice O'Connor had a thin record.
NEWS
By Thomas Sowell | June 30, 2005
RECENT SHOCKING Supreme Court decisions may at least wake up those people who have been saying glibly that the Senate has been spending too much time fighting over judicial nominees instead of getting back to the "real" issues. What is more real than the Supreme Court's decision throwing homeowners on the mercy of local politicians, who may want to confiscate their homes and turn the property over to some hotel or shopping mall that will pay more taxes? However outrageous it may be to make constitutional protections for property rights vanish by verbal sleight-of-hand, that is unfortunately very much in the mainstream of legal thinking, as the majority opinion in Kelo v. New London demonstrated by citing precedents leading in that direction.
NEWS
By George F. Will | February 6, 2000
WASHINGTON -- The day George W. Bush won Iowa's caucuses, the Supreme Court decided a case concerning campaign finance. One of Mr. Bush's father's worst and one of his best legacies were on display at the court that day. In an opinion written by Justice David Souter, who was nominated by President Bush, the court affirmed its 24-year-old ruling that permits government to regulate the right of Americans to engage in political speech. In dissent, Justice Clarence Thomas, another nominee of President Bush, argued correctly that the ruling is a perverse anomaly in First Amendment jurisprudence.
NEWS
July 25, 1997
IN HIS 34 years on the United States Supreme Court, Justice William J. Brennan made his presence felt in many ways. Appointed by President Dwight Eisenhower, a Republican, Justice Brennan became an influential liberal, writing more opinions than any justice in the court's history except for the prolific Justice William O. Douglas.His opinions shaped key areas of the law, especially individual rights. From the principle of "one person, one vote," which has guided reapportionment of legislative and congressional districts, to access for prisoners, the poor and the disabled to legal remedies for discrimination or unconstitutional treatment, Justice Brennan's decisions reflected an unshakable belief that the liberties enshrined in the Bill of Rights take precedence over the prerogatives or convenience of government.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | July 14, 1994
SEN.HOWARD Metzenbaum criticized Judge Stephen Breyer at his confirmation hearing because he had not stepped aside in eight cases in which he might have had a slight conflict of interest.The real problem is that he had to and did step aside in all asbestos cases because he knew he had a more significant conflict of interest. Why is that a problem? Because he was hired to rule in cases like that. That's what we pay him for. He should never have compromised himself by making risky investments in Lloyd's of London (after he became a judge)
NEWS
July 11, 1994
The Supreme Court term that just ended was the most uneventful in 40 years. It rendered only 84 decisions -- the fewest since the 1956. Few of its decisions were either surprising or likely to be considered landmark. It broke no new ground. If there was one surprise, one important development, it was the foreshadowing of the shape of things to come: a center-left bloc of justices that, while not dominant, could be more influential than any other combination.That bloc was composed of Justices Harry Blackmun, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, David Souter and John Paul Stevens.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | March 25, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court ruled 9-0 yesterday that the agency set up by Congress to reimburse customers of failed securities firms cannot use the federal racketeering law to sue those who it believes caused a firm's failure by manipulating the price of stocks.The ruling, with a majority opinion by Justice David H. Souter that four other justices signed, was based on narrow grounds. It left unresolved a broader question about the applicability of the racketeering law, known as RICO, to securities fraud cases.
NEWS
May 26, 1991
When his first abortion case came before the Supreme Court last year, new Justice David Souter seemed to express distaste for government regulations that forbid physicians in federally funded family planning clinics from telling women, even when they asked, even when their health or life was in danger, to mention abortion or to refer them elsewhere. Justice Souter said to the U.S. solicitor general, "You're telling us that the physician cannot perform his usual professional responsibility, that [the government]
NEWS
June 30, 1994
The Supreme Court left standing and perhaps even undisturbed the wall between church and state this week, in an opinion that would seem so routine as to escape attention were it not for the tenor of the dissent.The case involved a New York state law that created a public school district specifically for practitioners of Satmar Hasidism, an extremely rigid and conservative form of Judaism. The Satmars living in the exclusive religious enclave of Kiryas Joel in Orange County speak Yiddish as their primary language, segregate the sexes outside the home and educate their children in private religious schools.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 8, 1994
WASHINGTON -- In a ruling that could further liberate songwriting as a form of social criticism, the Supreme Court lowered yesterday the legal risks faced by composers who borrow music or words from a song for a new version that pans or ridicules the original.The unanimous decision appeared to go far toward rescuing musical parodies from legal action under federal copyright law, and to give wider legal leeway for comic parodists like television's Mark Russell.The ruling involved the rap group 2 Live Crew's rewrite of the classic Roy Orbison-William Dees rock 'n' roll ballad, "Oh, Pretty Woman."
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