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By Ken Fuson and By Ken Fuson,Special to the Sun | February 3, 2002
Lazy B: Growing Up on a Cattle Ranch in the American Southwest, by Sandra Day O'Connor and H. Alan Day. Random House. 318 pages. $24.95. The story of how a girl can grow up among cowboys, coyotes and rattlesnakes on a real-life Ponderosa in the bone-dry Southwest to become the first female justice of the U.S. Supreme Court has all the elements necessary for an inspiring, only-in-America memoir. It's a shame that Sandra Day O'Connor booted this wonderful opportunity to tell it. There's much to admire about Lazy B, a collection of profiles and anecdotes from O'Connor's childhood, spent mostly on the family's 160,000-acre cattle ranch that straddled the high desert land between Arizona and New Mexico.
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NEWS
By Annie Linskey | annie.linskey@baltsun.com | March 4, 2010
Former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor says she is "all for" a proposal that would end competitive elections for Maryland's Circuit Court judges, championing a concept that is attracting new attention in Annapolis this year because of loosening campaign finance rules and increasing concerns about money flowing into judicial races. "The independence of the judiciary is something that we all ought to care about," O'Connor said at a hearing in Annapolis on Wednesday afternoon.
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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | April 9, 1991
Secy Baker has seen the Kurdish plight up close, so we don't have to worry about that any more.Justice Souter turns out as a jurisprudential twin of Justice O'Connor. The same wisp of a smile, the same inscrutable mystery about which way he'll jump.Nostalgia for the '80s! Her biographer says that Nancy was more interesting than you thought.Cheer up. The umpires are working.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | June 29, 2007
BOSTON -- Now, in the season of her discontent, it is well to remember that Ruth Bader Ginsburg was always called a moderate. In fact, when she was nominated to be the second woman on the Supreme Court, there were feminists who added another modifier: too moderate. I always thought that was a bad rap. Justice Ginsburg went to law school when textbooks still read: "Land, like woman, was meant to be possessed." Her dean asked the nine women in her class of 500 why they were taking a man's seat.
NEWS
By LYLE DENNISTON and LYLE DENNISTON,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 1, 1995
The woman who breached the male bastion of the Supreme Court 14 years ago is not ready, at age 65, to retreat to the place history has reserved for her. Justice Sandra Day O'Connor is at the peak of her power on the court and over the lives of Americans.She has converted her one vote on the court into a formidable authority - and has done so almost by accident. Achieving the pinnacle of influence without obviously seeking it, Justice O'Connor has outlasted the rapid changes at the court to emerge as first among equals.
NEWS
July 2, 2005
IN ANNOUNCING her retirement from the U.S. Supreme Court, Sandra Day O'Connor has - at once - left a gaping hole in the center of the court and given George W. Bush his first opportunity to have an even more lasting influence on American jurisprudence than he has had with scores of appointments to lower federal courts. Given the tense standoff between the White House and the Senate generated by some of those nominees, it's at least somewhat comforting that Mr. Bush expressed admiration for Justice O'Connor's "intellect, wisdom and personal decency."
NEWS
By Newsday | April 17, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Swathed in black robes, Sandra Day O'Connor puts on what her son calls her "sourpuss straight face" as she looks down from the elevated mahogany bench on the lawyers who have come as supplicants.Typically, she is more formal or more severe than her fellow Supreme Court justices when questions are raised.But little do these unfortunate barristers know of the other side of the first woman to serve on the court, the side that joins her "mobile party unit" of eight women once a year for an intense week of tennis and bridge, the side that swings in the local tavern with blue-jeaned cowboys who have no idea who it is they are throwing around on the dance floor.
NEWS
By Paula A. Monopoli | July 3, 2005
IN WHAT WILL be an avalanche of speculation as to who will replace Justice Sandra Day O'Connor on the Supreme Court, it is worth pausing to appreciate her role as a historic figure in the progress of American women. Justice O'Connor's resignation gives President Bush his first chance to shape a court that has remained the most stable in Supreme Court history. President Ronald Reagan's nomination of Arizona Court of Appeals Judge Sandra Day O'Connor in 1981 as the first woman to sit on the highest court in the land was a milestone for American women.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 18, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Justice Sandra Day O'Connor appeared yesterday to squelch chances that the Supreme Court would soon proclaim a tough constitutional ban on sex discrimination in the nation.Ten minutes into a hearing on a case testing the exclusion of women from Virginia Military Institute, Justice O'Connor ridiculed the idea that the court should adopt a new standard that would nullify nearly all laws or government rules that treat men and women differently.The constitutionality of VMI's male-only admissions seemed unclear after the one-hour hearing, although five of the justices closely questioned the college's lawyer about the 157-year-old policy.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | June 26, 1993
It was a beautiful day to christen a sailboat, a perfect, breezy Annapolis day, with a Supreme Court justice and the ambassador from New Zealand in attendance at the ceremony at the Naval Academy. The only thing missing was the boat.Nance Frank and her all-female crew of 12 had been 60 miles off the Florida Keys a week ago training for the 33,000-mile Whitbread Round the World Race, one of the most grueling in yachting circles, when part of the mast of their 64-foot craft broke.They repaired it in Fort Lauderdale, but realized that they would not be able to sail to Annapolis in time for the christening ceremony.
NEWS
By JEFF ZELENY and JEFF ZELENY,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 31, 2006
WASHINGTON -- A last-minute attempt to block Samuel A. Alito Jr.'s nomination to the Supreme Court failed yesterday as a Democratic-led filibuster was defeated 72-25, paving the way for the conservative judge to be confirmed by the Senate before President Bush's State of the Union address tonight. At the close of a day of bitter debate over the changing direction of the court, at least 57 senators had committed to vote for Alito's nomination - including four Democrats - which all but guarantees that the appellate judge will become the nation's 110th Supreme Court justice.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | January 16, 2006
SIOUX FALLS, S.D. -- To know what's at stake in the Supreme Court confirmation hearings, it's best to travel 1,200 miles west from the paneled Senate room to a small nondescript clinic in a Great Plains state. It's best to turn from the blue-and-white charts brandished by senators to the parking lot filled with cars from places as far away as Rapid City, S.D., or even Wyoming. It's best to turn from the buzz about precedents and privacy to the quiet of a waiting room. Here, late in the afternoon, the clinic is still full.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | November 7, 2005
BOSTON -- There was a moment in Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr.'s introduction when he tipped his hat to the justice he hopes to succeed. As a rookie arguing his first case before the Supreme Court, Judge Alito remembered, Sandra Day O'Connor's first question was a gentle one. "I was grateful to her on that happy occasion," he said, "and I'm particularly honored to be nominated for her seat." Judge Alito did not mention the time Justice O'Connor was far less gentle, the day she offered a bruising rebuttal to one of his appeals court opinions.
NEWS
By ERWIN CHEMERINSKY | October 6, 2005
Harriet Miers is truly a stealth candidate for the Supreme Court, and senators must insist that unless she answers detailed questions about her views, she will not be confirmed. Unlike Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., who authored dozens of briefs and hundreds of memos on crucial issues, Ms. Miers apparently has little record on constitutional questions. The Senate cannot confirm Ms. Miers on blind faith that she will not be a vote to radically change the law in countless areas in which Justice Sandra Day O'Connor has been the crucial fifth vote.
NEWS
September 29, 2005
Despite some sniping and griping by Democrats, Judge John G. Roberts Jr. is certain to be confirmed today as chief justice of the United States. But he won't have much time to savor the moment as he'll have to dive right into the nearly 50 cases that are facing the court as it begins the 2005-2006 term on Monday. Even without some of the surefire attention-getters in the lineup of cases - including campaign finance reform, capital punishment, abortion rights, assisted suicide, military recruiters on campus, and police searches - this would be an unusual court session.
NEWS
September 5, 2005
FROM HIS early days as an attorney and a top official at the Justice Department to his tenure as Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, William H. Rehnquist had a profound impact on the U.S. judiciary and on American life and politics. A friendly man who followed a true conservative philosophy, Mr. Rehnquist, who died last week at the age of 80, after battling thyroid cancer, pushed the court to the right, but was not doctrinaire while doing so. His death creates a second vacancy on the court in just two months -- following the retirement of Sandra Day O'Connor in July -- after 11 years with no changes.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | November 7, 2005
BOSTON -- There was a moment in Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr.'s introduction when he tipped his hat to the justice he hopes to succeed. As a rookie arguing his first case before the Supreme Court, Judge Alito remembered, Sandra Day O'Connor's first question was a gentle one. "I was grateful to her on that happy occasion," he said, "and I'm particularly honored to be nominated for her seat." Judge Alito did not mention the time Justice O'Connor was far less gentle, the day she offered a bruising rebuttal to one of his appeals court opinions.
NEWS
By LYLE DENNISTON and LYLE DENNISTON,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 1, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Sandra Day O'Connor, a woman of global reputation and a member of America's power elite, remains mostly a stranger in her own land.The first woman justice on the Supreme Court, and now a thoroughly familiar symbol of the achieving woman, she is often the center of attention at glittering Washington social gatherings. She also is an active public speaker. And yet, she is among the capital city's most remote celebrities.The public sometimes remembers her celebrity, sometimes forgets it: She was on the Gallup Organization's "most admired women" list for the first five years she was a justice, beginning in 1981, but appeared only intermittently after that: in 1989 and 1991, and not since.
NEWS
By Thomas Sowell | July 7, 2005
MY REACTION TO Justice Sandra Day O'Connor's retirement was almost as positive as my reaction was negative in 1981 when the Reagan administration announced that it was going to appoint a woman to the Supreme Court. It wouldn't matter if all nine justices of the Supreme Court were women, if these were the nine best people available. But to decide in advance that you were going to appoint a woman and then look only among women for a nominee was a dangerous gamble with a court that has become dangerous enough otherwise.
NEWS
July 7, 2005
Democrats seek to stifle the will of the public In relation to Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor's retirement, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy says, "If the president abuses his power and nominates someone who threatens to roll back the rights and freedoms of the American people, the American people will insist that we oppose that nominee" ("Stage set for battle over a nominee to high court," July 2). Abuses his power? The last time the Democratic nominee for president got more than 50 percent of the popular vote was in 1976, almost 30 years ago. In the 103rd Congress (1993-1995)
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