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By TIM BAKER | February 1, 1993
If there be such things as ghosts, then Justice Thurgood Marshall's angry spirit must have stalked the Supreme Court's marble corridors last week. He died on Sunday. The next morning, in an ironic twist of timing, the Court announced yet another ruling which will expedite the death penalty in America.Justice Marshall would have hurled a thundering dissent at the decision. He abhorred the death penalty as an abomination -- immoral in principle, discriminatory in practice, unconstitutional in law. Before his retirement in 1991, he had battled against it for 24 years on the Supreme Court.
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NEWS
By Emad Hassan | July 15, 2014
I have been locked up at Guantanamo Bay for 12 years, held without charge or trial. I've done nothing wrong; in 2009, I was unanimously cleared for release by six different branches of the U.S. government, including the FBI and the CIA. Yet here I am, still detained. I write this 106 years after the birth of Thurgood Marshall, a Baltimore-born civil rights lawyer and later a Supreme Court justice who helped end segregation in America. Marshall understood and respected the humanity and innate equality of all people.
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NEWS
February 6, 1993
In his later years, Justice Thurgood Marshall gained a reputation as something of a curmudgeon. He could, for example, be scathing in his assessment of the movers and shakers of his time: He once called Robert F. Kennedy "a cold, calculating character" and thought the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. "wasn't worth diddly squat" as an organizer, according to taped interviews recorded in 1977.But what others viewed as inveterate grouchiness, Marshall himself put down to his preference for plain speaking.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2013
As a long-haired teen growing up in the 1960s, Jim McCullough had little clue what he wanted to do with his life, but two things did stir him: He hated the way some people in Laurel, his hometown, looked down on his African-American friends, and he loved using the wood lathe in shop class. He has traded the hippie locks for a grandfather's trim goatee. He long ago gained renown in the region as a master furniture craftsman, at times for his work on pieces used by government officials from presidents to attorneys general.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | October 17, 1992
Retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall is coming home to Baltimore -- to sit as a judge in the city where he was born and raised and where he began his legal career six decades ago.Justice Marshall will hear appeals court arguments in the Edward A. Garmatz federal courthouse during the week of Oct. 26, said Thomas Schrinel, deputy executive of the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.Justice Marshall returned to the bench in New York City in January to listen to arguments before the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.
NEWS
By Doug Birch Rafael Alvarez, Sandy Banisky and Martin C. Evans of The Sun's metropolitan staff also contributed to this article | June 28, 1991
The Sun incorrectly reported yesterday that former U.S. Representative Parren J. Mitchell became the first black graduate of the University of Maryland's School of Social Work, because of a court decision striking down a discriminatory admissions policy. In fact, Mr. Mitchell was the first black to attend graduate school at the University of Maryland at College Park, where he received a master's degree in sociology in 1952. The dean of the School of Social Work said yesterday that his school never had a policy of discrimination.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,Staff Writer | January 29, 1993
Douglass High School yesterday paid tribute to Thurgood Marshall, a member of the class of 1925 who became one of great legal minds in the battle against segregation and eventually rose to a seat on the U.S. Supreme Court.During the tribute, Shirley Hill, principal of the West Baltimore school, described Mr. Marshall as a mischievious student who was forced to read the U.S. Constitution as punishment for his misdeeds. Some historians say the punishment sparked Mr. Marshall's love for the law.Mr.
NEWS
By Albert Sehlstedt Jr. and Albert Sehlstedt Jr.,Staff Writer | January 25, 1993
Thurgood Marshall, the indefatigable legal champion of America's mid-century civil rights movement, who became the first black person to serve on the Supreme Court, died yesterday of heart failure.Justice Marshall, who had been in poor health for the past several years, died at 2 p.m. at Bethesda Naval Medical Center, according to Toni House, Supreme Court spokeswoman. He was 84."He was a giant in the quest for human rights and equal opportunity in the whole history of our country," President Clinton said of the Baltimore native.
BUSINESS
By Gary Cohn and Gary Cohn,Staff Writer | January 29, 1994
The late Thurgood Marshall is best known as a champion of the civil rights movement. What isn't as well known, though, is that Justice Marshall also was a stalwart of the environmental movement that grew up during his 24 years on the U.S. Supreme Court.That is the conclusion of Robert Percival, a professor at the University of Maryland School of Law who spent two months last summer poring through Thurgood Marshall's papers at the Library of Congress. The papers were made public last year, providing law professors, historians and reporters with an unusually detailed view of the inner workings of the court.
NEWS
By Crystal Nix & Sheryll D. Cashin | May 28, 1993
AS LAW clerks to Justice Thurgood Marshall in his final two years at the Supreme Court, we are dismayed by the Library of Congress' indiscriminate release of Justice Marshall's court papers to the public. We are certain that his wishes have not been honored.In many separate conversations with us -- including during the fall of 1991, when Justice Marshall allegedly permitted full access to his papers upon his death -- Justice Marshall made clear how greatly he valued the confidentiality of the court's deliberations and that he had no intention of violating that ethic.
NEWS
By Michael Higginbotham | January 23, 2013
Thursday marks the 20th anniversary of the death of Baltimore-born Thurgood Marshall, the civil rights lawyer and first black Supreme Court justice who was instrumental in ending Jim Crow segregation. His representation of schoolgirl Linda Brown resulted in the landmark 1954 Supreme Court ruling Brown v. Board of Education, which ended separation practiced in a wide variety of public facilities and institutions. Yet Marshall sought more than just desegregation. Explaining his vision, Marshall proclaimed that "a child born to a black mother in a state like Mississippi … has exactly the same rights as a white baby born to the wealthiest person in the United States.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2012
Llewellyn Washington Woolford Sr., a retired Social Security Administration attorney who was a past Howard County Human Relations Commission chairman, died of stroke complications Feb. 22 at his Columbia home. He was 81. Born in Baltimore and raised on Robert Street, he was a 1947 Frederick Douglass High School graduate. He earned a bachelor's degree at Lincoln University and a law degree at Howard University, where he was a founding editor of its law journal. Family members said that while a student at Howard, he witnessed Thurgood Marshall in a moot court argument of the landmark Brown vs. the Board of Education case.
NEWS
September 8, 2005
Schaefer wrong about Marshall statue ceremony Maryland Comptroller William Donald Schaefer misstated history while expressing his opposition to renaming Baltimore-Washington International Airport in honor of Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall. Mr. Schaefer claimed that Justice Marshall "didn't want to come to the dedication of his statue on Pratt Street" ("Final approval given to adding Marshall name to BWI," Sept. 1). I remember that ceremony, and the comptroller is mistaken. Justice Marshall not only attended the May 1980 ceremony outside the federal courthouse downtown but he also spoke.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2005
In a ceremony filled with song and tributes, the state's top leaders renamed Baltimore-Washington International Airport yesterday for civil rights legend Thurgood Marshall, the nation's first African-American Supreme Court justice. Speaking from her wheelchair in front of the statue of Marshall at the State House, Dorothy Height, the longtime head of the National Council of Negro Women, said Marshall's courage, optimism and perseverance were an inspiration to her and the other great leaders of the civil rights movement.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2005
When Gov. Marvin Mandel of Maryland signed the 1973 order that changed the name of the state's largest airport to Baltimore-Washington International, the order stated that the former name, Friendship International Airport, did "not communicate the location of this fine facility to travelers in other parts of the nation and world." More than 30 years later, that is still the concern of state business, marketing and aviation experts, who are uncertain about the proposal in the legislature to rename the airport for the late Supreme Court justice from Baltimore, Thurgood Marshall.
NEWS
By Juan Williams | May 16, 2004
FIFTY YEARS later, the landscape of American race relations looks so radically different that it is hard to remember what the nation looked like before the Supreme Court's decision in Brown vs. Board of Education. But in 2004, an increasing number of people are openly asking whether Brown failed, because public schools remain so highly segregated 50 years later. This is a dangerous argument. The Brown case was never only about schools. It was the leading edge of a fight against racial segregation in all of American life.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun Dan Fesperman, Karen Hosler, Peter Osterlund and Arch Parsons of The Sun's Washington Bureau contributed to this article | June 28, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Justice Thurgood Marshall, the only black ever to sit on the Supreme Court, retired yesterday after 24 years of stubborn and often eloquent liberalism on the nation's highest tribunal.A hero to the nation's blacks before he ever joined the court, as a seldom-defeated civil rights lawyer from the founding of the revolution this century to achieve black equality, Justice Marshall solidified his place in history by breaking the court's 178-year-old "for whites only" barrier.Although he had often said, more seriously than in jest, that he had a lifetime appointment and that he would "serve out my term," the justice told President Bush yesterday that his "advancing age and medical condition" forced his retirement now.He will be 83 on Tuesday.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 25, 1993
WASHINGTON -- When the Supreme Court first considered whether the Constitution should protect private homosexual acts, the justices showed little interest. Only two of the nine voted in 1985 even to hear the case of an Atlanta man arrested for having sex with another man in his own bedroom.But over the next year and a half, the case known as Bowers vs. Hardwick became a high-stakes poker game among the justices, as conservatives and liberals on the court struggled behind the scenes to make it a definitive constitutional statement on homosexual rights.
FEATURES
By M. DION THOMPSON and M. DION THOMPSON,SUN STAFF | November 3, 1998
The man answering the door at 1632 Division St. is not pleased. Just moments earlier he was enjoying his afternoon meal. Now someone is on his steps, asking questions about the plaque that says Thurgood Marshall lived here."
NEWS
By JUAN WILLIAMS | October 2, 1998
This is an edited excerpt of a talk given by journalist Juan Williams at the Baltimore Book Festival on Sunday. Mr. Williams is author of "Thurgood Marshall -- American Revolutionary," a new biography of the late Supreme Court justice.BALTIMORE gave Thurgood Marshall his lifelong vision of racial equality because black people in Baltimore, even at the turn of the century, had a great deal of political power. Also, they had the right to go to school, to serve on juries.Both of Thurgood Marshall's grandfathers were large players in the black community here.
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