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NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | August 6, 1993
Boston. -- On Tuesday morning, in a rare blip of agreement, 96 United States senators voted to send Ruth Bader Ginsburg onto the Supreme Court -- and straight into the arms of her historic foremothers.The diminutive judge and women's rights lawyer will not only join the ranks of justices. She will permanently join the ranks of such historic figures as Alice Mary Robertson, Alta M. Hulett, and Lydia Folger Fowler. She will become an official second woman.Alice, Alta and Lydia may not be exactly household names.
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NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | June 29, 2007
BOSTON -- Now, in the season of her discontent, it is well to remember that Ruth Bader Ginsburg was always called a moderate. In fact, when she was nominated to be the second woman on the Supreme Court, there were feminists who added another modifier: too moderate. I always thought that was a bad rap. Justice Ginsburg went to law school when textbooks still read: "Land, like woman, was meant to be possessed." Her dean asked the nine women in her class of 500 why they were taking a man's seat.
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NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | June 29, 2007
BOSTON -- Now, in the season of her discontent, it is well to remember that Ruth Bader Ginsburg was always called a moderate. In fact, when she was nominated to be the second woman on the Supreme Court, there were feminists who added another modifier: too moderate. I always thought that was a bad rap. Justice Ginsburg went to law school when textbooks still read: "Land, like woman, was meant to be possessed." Her dean asked the nine women in her class of 500 why they were taking a man's seat.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | April 6, 2007
BOSTON -- This begins with the sound of one shoe dropping. A few weeks ago, a Supreme Court reporter noticed that Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg took an unusually long time getting on her feet after a hearing. Blogging away on "Legalities," ABC's Jan Crawford Greenburg breezily wrote that it "made me think I'd better start pulling those possible retirement files together." This hint about Justice Ginsburg's health moved across the blogosphere at, well, Internet speed. Days later, New York Times Supreme Court reporter Linda Greenhouse - tweaking her colleague - offered a "pedestrian" explanation for the justice's slowness: Justice Ginsburg couldn't find one of the shoes she'd kicked off under the table.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | April 23, 2004
THE HONORABLE RUTH Bader Ginsburg got it right. She opted to leave the Supreme Court out of the Maurice Clarett crusade so the court can decide more important things, like presidential elections. That doesn't mean Justice Ginsburg wasn't wrong. What will Rush Limbaugh and/or Al Franken have to say about this head-scratching refusal by a judge to overstep her bounds? An opera-loving, liberal champion of individual rights, Justice Ginsburg let the people down yesterday. As former Washington running back John Riggins once shouted to Justice Sandra Day O'Connor during a 1985 dinner function: Loosen up, Ruthie, baby.
NEWS
By Geneva Overholser | August 21, 2001
WASHINGTON - Let us now praise famous women, especially those with the grace and wisdom to champion other women - with resulting benefit for all people. A lovely example has arisen with the publication of the memoir of Malvina Harlan. Not that Malvina was famous. She was not - although she hosted Washington society weekly, by the hundreds. That was because her husband was Supreme Court Justice John Marshall Harlan. What Malvina Shanklin Harlan did was to write a compelling memoir about the Harlans' life and times - remarkable times, encompassing slavery, the Civil War and its aftermath.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | October 14, 1993
WASHINGTON -- New Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg served notice yesterday that she is not likely to go easy on lawyers who argue timidly for women's rights before the court.In a highly unusual effort by a justice to push lawyers openly and repeatedly to get them to embrace stronger legal positions, Ms. Ginsburg used volleys of questions in a sexual harassment case to stake out a strong liberal stance on protection of female workers.The case of a Tennessee woman who quit in response to repeated sexually tinged remarks and gestures from her boss may lead the court to spell out the kinds of on-the-job behavior that will be illegal under federal law aimed at workplace discrimination.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | October 4, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court, in search of a new judicial identity as its fourth new member in five years takes a seat, sets off today on a broad and potentially historic review of deep conflicts over civil rights.In a sense, its new term already is historic: For the first time there will be two women on the bench. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who joined the court in August, is already at work behind the scenes.No longer will Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, a member since 1981, be the lone female ever to sit among "the brethren."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 14, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Justices Antonin Scalia and Ruth Bader Ginsburg clashed yesterday during a spirited exchange in the Supreme Court over how to define sexual harassment in the workplace.At issue was whether a woman's job performance must suffer in some way before she can claim she is a victim of illegal job discrimination.Government attorney Jeffrey P. Minear was arguing that a woman's job performance need not be affected by the harassment."You're still talking about an unpleasant environment," said Justice Scalia, clearly unconvinced that such conditions alone constituted discrimination.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 10, 1994
Forty miles from their marble cloister and in street clothes, four Supreme Court justices relaxed yesterday and told some secrets from behind the red curtains.At a conference of federal judges in Baltimore, the justices revealed some tricks on influencing one another's vote, some ways to scare off supporting votes and some frustrations at having a vote and a voice that sometimes doesn't count much.A common complaint: The life of a beginner on the Supreme Court is sometimes a disappointment, even when being the junior justice means you get the last word.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | April 23, 2004
THE HONORABLE RUTH Bader Ginsburg got it right. She opted to leave the Supreme Court out of the Maurice Clarett crusade so the court can decide more important things, like presidential elections. That doesn't mean Justice Ginsburg wasn't wrong. What will Rush Limbaugh and/or Al Franken have to say about this head-scratching refusal by a judge to overstep her bounds? An opera-loving, liberal champion of individual rights, Justice Ginsburg let the people down yesterday. As former Washington running back John Riggins once shouted to Justice Sandra Day O'Connor during a 1985 dinner function: Loosen up, Ruthie, baby.
NEWS
By Geneva Overholser | August 21, 2001
WASHINGTON - Let us now praise famous women, especially those with the grace and wisdom to champion other women - with resulting benefit for all people. A lovely example has arisen with the publication of the memoir of Malvina Harlan. Not that Malvina was famous. She was not - although she hosted Washington society weekly, by the hundreds. That was because her husband was Supreme Court Justice John Marshall Harlan. What Malvina Shanklin Harlan did was to write a compelling memoir about the Harlans' life and times - remarkable times, encompassing slavery, the Civil War and its aftermath.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 15, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has been receiving chemotherapy and radiation as a follow-up to surgery last fall for colon cancer, her office disclosed yesterday. She said the treatments began in October and will continue through June, and are "precautionary" and "have not affected my schedule at the court." The 66-year-old justice has been on the bench each day during the court's current term, which began in early October. She also has continued with public appearances outside the Supreme Court.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 10, 1994
Forty miles from their marble cloister and in street clothes, four Supreme Court justices relaxed yesterday and told some secrets from behind the red curtains.At a conference of federal judges in Baltimore, the justices revealed some tricks on influencing one another's vote, some ways to scare off supporting votes and some frustrations at having a vote and a voice that sometimes doesn't count much.A common complaint: The life of a beginner on the Supreme Court is sometimes a disappointment, even when being the junior justice means you get the last word.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | October 14, 1993
WASHINGTON -- New Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg served notice yesterday that she is not likely to go easy on lawyers who argue timidly for women's rights before the court.In a highly unusual effort by a justice to push lawyers openly and repeatedly to get them to embrace stronger legal positions, Ms. Ginsburg used volleys of questions in a sexual harassment case to stake out a strong liberal stance on protection of female workers.The case of a Tennessee woman who quit in response to repeated sexually tinged remarks and gestures from her boss may lead the court to spell out the kinds of on-the-job behavior that will be illegal under federal law aimed at workplace discrimination.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 14, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Justices Antonin Scalia and Ruth Bader Ginsburg clashed yesterday during a spirited exchange in the Supreme Court over how to define sexual harassment in the workplace.At issue was whether a woman's job performance must suffer in some way before she can claim she is a victim of illegal job discrimination.Government attorney Jeffrey P. Minear was arguing that a woman's job performance need not be affected by the harassment."You're still talking about an unpleasant environment," said Justice Scalia, clearly unconvinced that such conditions alone constituted discrimination.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau | August 11, 1993
WASHINGTON -- It was supposed to be a perfect day at the White House -- and it nearly was.The sun shone, audiences at the White House clapped appreciatively and President Clinton basked -- twice -- in the Marine band's renditions of "Hail to the Chief," first as he signed his hallmark economic bill and then again when he marched into the East Room for the swearing-in of new Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg."
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | September 18, 1993
WASHINGTON -- One of the biggest political plums the nation's voters handed to President Clinton -- the chance to give scores of men and women high-prestige jobs as federal judges -- is still waiting to be harvested.Eight months into his presidency, Mr. Clinton has chosen 14 women and men for judgeships: Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and 13 lower court judges. The Senate has approved Judge Ginsburg and will start reviewing the others within the next few weeks.But, at this point, 120 other seats still have no nominees; many of them have not been occupied by a judge since Congress created them as new seats nearly three years ago; a few judgeships have been empty for nearly four years, and one for almost five.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | October 4, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court, in search of a new judicial identity as its fourth new member in five years takes a seat, sets off today on a broad and potentially historic review of deep conflicts over civil rights.In a sense, its new term already is historic: For the first time there will be two women on the bench. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who joined the court in August, is already at work behind the scenes.No longer will Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, a member since 1981, be the lone female ever to sit among "the brethren."
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | September 18, 1993
WASHINGTON -- One of the biggest political plums the nation's voters handed to President Clinton -- the chance to give scores of men and women high-prestige jobs as federal judges -- is still waiting to be harvested.Eight months into his presidency, Mr. Clinton has chosen 14 women and men for judgeships: Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and 13 lower court judges. The Senate has approved Judge Ginsburg and will start reviewing the others within the next few weeks.But, at this point, 120 other seats still have no nominees; many of them have not been occupied by a judge since Congress created them as new seats nearly three years ago; a few judgeships have been empty for nearly four years, and one for almost five.
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