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By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2011
Constellation Energy Group's plans to sell itself to Exelon Corp. cleared a regulatory hurdle Wednesday after the two companies reached a proposed settlement with the U.S. Department of Justice. The settlement, which requires court approval, calls for the companies to sell three coal plants in Maryland to alleviate market concentration in the mid-Atlantic electricity grid. Exelon and Constellation already announced plans to divest the Brandon Shores and H.A. Wagner plants in Anne Arundel County and the C.P. Crane plant in Baltimore County.
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NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | October 12, 2014
"[O]ne man appears to be a more eligible dispenser of the mercy of government, than a body of men. " - Alexander Hamilton, Federalist No. 74 Every politician wants a legacy - an issue or institution that evolves far beyond the official's time in public office. Sometimes, unexpected events intervene and the intended legacy items do not go according to plan. My experience is a good example of such an unplanned legacy. Some of you will recall our administration's steadfast support for charter schools - public schools that enjoy a greater degree of autonomy than the standard public school.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann | December 8, 2011
Baltimore Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III is at a U.S. House of Representatives Judiciary Committee hearing this morning. He's in the audience to support federal assistance in combating crime, according to a department spokesman. The city's top cop is not scheduled to testify, but the spokesman, Anthony Guglielmi, said a question or two could be directed his way. The oversight hearing is addressing concerns about the ATF Fast and Furious program, which has come under heavy criticism for allowing guns to be purchased in the U.S. and transported to Mexico where they were used by drug cartels.
NEWS
Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
The U.S. Department of Justice will conduct a civil rights investigation into allegations of brutality and misconduct by the Baltimore Police Department, Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts announced Friday. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Batts requested the probe after a six-month investigation by The Baltimore Sun found city residents have suffered battered faces and broken bones during arrests . The city has paid $5.7 million in court judgments and settlements in 102 cases since 2011, and nearly all of the people who received payouts were cleared of criminal charges, according to the investigation published this week.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2014
Kelly Hayes knew from the time she was in middle school that she wanted to be a lawyer, and she crafted the choices she made as a teenager to set her up to become a federal prosecutor. "The joke around my family is that I started practicing my arguments at 13," Hayes said. Hayes, 29, landed her dream job as an assistant U.S. attorney in Maryland last May and has already worked on a range of cases, including alleged bribery schemes, drug deals and immigration violations. For years, young attorneys hoping to land a job with the Department of Justice's headquarters or in the U.S. attorney's offices around the country ran into a prolonged hiring freeze.
NEWS
Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
The U.S. Department of Justice will conduct a civil rights investigation into allegations of brutality and misconduct by the Baltimore Police Department, Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts announced Friday. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Batts requested the probe after a six-month investigation by The Baltimore Sun found city residents have suffered battered faces and broken bones during arrests . The city has paid $5.7 million in court judgments and settlements in 102 cases since 2011, and nearly all of the people who received payouts were cleared of criminal charges, according to the investigation published this week.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2014
The U.S. Department of Justice has identified and begun targeting a broad conspiracy to fix prices on automobile shipments in and out of Baltimore and other U.S. ports, with a Chilean company recently pleading guilty to violating federal antitrust laws in the scheme. Justice officials reached a felony plea agreement with Valparaiso, Chile-based Compania Sud Americana de Vapores (CSAV), according to documents filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore. They called it the first charge to land in a continuing antitrust investigation into companies colluding to push up shipping prices.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | June 3, 1995
NEW YORK -- The Justice Department is speeding up its antitrust probe of the Nasdaq stock market by imposing an early-summer deadline for investigators to come up with preliminary results of their findings.Assistant Attorney General Anne Bingaman has asked the government's team of a half-dozen attorneys and economists looking into possible collusion among Nasdaq dealers to report their findings by the end of June, a person at the Justice Department said.The securities industry was skeptical the government has found any smoking gun to prove that Nasdaq market makers colluded to keep the difference, or spreads, between stock bid and ask prices unusually large.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | February 12, 1993
WASHINGTON -- If confirmed by the Senate, Attorney General-designate Janet Reno will head a highly skilled Justice Department plagued in recent months by severe criticism, feuding and declining morale.Among the myriad problems facing the new attorney general, who will manage 92,000 employees and a $10.9 million annual budget, are the following:* FBI director -- Beset by ethics charges and an image of weakness, FBI Director William S. Sessions may not survive much longer at the top of the nation's No. 1 police agency.
NEWS
By Susan Hansen and Susan Hansen,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 31, 1990
WASHINGTON -- A growing backlog of unpaid debts to the government has topped $7.5 billion and could be lost to the U.S. Treasury forever if the Justice Department does not step up its sluggish debt-collection efforts, a congressional committee warned yesterday.Delinquency on unpaid federal debts -- ranging from defaulted home mortgages and student loans to unpaid criminal fines -- shot up from 14 percent to 33 percent in the past eight years, according to a report released by the House Committee on Government Operations.
NEWS
By Bernard C. "Jack" Young | October 3, 2014
As I view the constant protesting by residents of Ferguson, Mo., nearly two months after a police officer fatally shot an unarmed teenager, I know that it's only a matter of time before the streets of Baltimore are filled with the same sustained clarion call for justice that has rocked the once inconspicuous Midwestern city. On the surface, the city of Baltimore and Ferguson are worlds apart. With a population nearly 30 times larger than Ferguson, Baltimore is a major American city and cultural hub. From Francis Scott Key to H.L. Mencken to Thurgood Marshall, Baltimore has produced more than its fair share of American icons.
NEWS
October 2, 2014
Eric H. Holder has indeed left behind an impressive legacy ( "The Holder legacy Sept. 28). As the nation's top law-enforcement officer he has refused to follow or enforce the law. Here is his legacy: He allowed the IRS to target conservative groups and ignore congressional subpoenas, then stood by when the agency "lost" emails by Lois Lerner and others to thwart the investigation. He allowed the State Department and the executive branch to ignore subpoenas in the Benghazi investigation and disallowed the interviewing of witnesses by Congress.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
- Marylander Thomas E. Perez, who has served as secretary of the U.S. Department of Labor for a little more than a year, is now being eyed for an even more prominent position in President Barack Obama's second-term Cabinet: successor to Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. Perez, a former Maryland labor secretary and Justice Department official, is emerging as a candidate in part because of his extensive legal background but also because he has...
NEWS
September 28, 2014
Of all the offices in the federal government, the job of attorney general may be one of the toughest as well the most thankless. Eric H. Holder, who announced last week that he is stepping down as the nation's top law enforcement official six years after becoming the first African-American ever to hold that position, was no stranger to the controversy that comes with the job nor to the endless stream of criticism directed at its occupants. His tenure was not perfect - the failure to crack down sufficiently on the financial speculators who brought our economy to ruin being perhaps the greatest shortcoming.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
A Japanese shipping line will pay a nearly $70 million fine after agreeing to plead guilty to fixing prices and rigging bids for services at the port of Baltimore, the Justice Department said Friday. Kawasaki Kisen Kaisha Ltd., or K-Line, is the latest ocean carrier charged in a massive antitrust investigation of companies that federal officials say have conspired to drive up international shipping prices. K-Line, which was charged in U.S. District Court in Baltimore on Friday, provides shipping services for roll-on, roll-off cargo — including cars, trucks and construction equipment — to and from the U.S. and elsewhere.
NEWS
John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Sen. Ben Cardin has joined a coalition of civil rights groups in pressing the Obama administration to finish a years-old review of its guidance on racial profiling, an effort supporters say should be a priority following this summer's upheaval in Ferguson, Mo. Justice Department officials are set to expand a 2003 ban on racial profiling for federal agencies, but advocates say the effort has taken too long and they want Attorney General Eric Holder...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 19, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The Justice Department is considering whether to appoint a special prosecutor to conduct its inquiry into charges of possible misconduct by independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr, officials said yesterday.One proposal discussed in recent days is the appointment of a U.S. attorney, possibly one with solid Republican credentials, who would supervise Justice Department prosecutors and FBI agents, said the officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity.U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno has not reached a decision, the officials said, but her aides have weighed options should she decide to take the investigation away from the Office of Professional Responsibility, the department's in-house ethics unit.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 23, 1999
TRENTON, N.J. -- Citing extensive evidence that New Jersey State Police officers have discriminated against minority motorists, the Justice Department announced yesterday that it will appoint an outside monitor to oversee the police agency and to ensure that it enacts reforms.The monitor, who will be chosen by the U.S. attorney in New Jersey and will report to a federal judge, will have broad powers to inspect virtually any function of officers and their supervisors, but will specifically order them to keep records of arrests and traffic stops by race to make sure that minorities are not being singled out.The monitor will also be charged with following through on the Justice Department's recommendations that New Jersey overhaul the Police Department's secretive internal affairs system, which many civil rights advocates and former troopers said was used to protect abusive and bigoted officers.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's administration settled a discrimination complaint brought by the U.S. Department of Justice, agreeing to ensure that hiring follows rules that forbid asking most job candidates to take medical exams. The Justice Department had accused the city of violating the Americans with Disabilities Act after the Fire Department refused to hire a candidate for a dispatcher position when a medical exam revealed that she had a disability. The city agreed to pay the woman $65,000 and to ensure its hiring policies and practices follow the law, according to a consent decree filed with a complaint in U.S. District Court on Wednesday.
NEWS
April 24, 2014
There are about 7,000 people serving federal prison sentences for crimes related to crack cocaine who would not still be there if they had, instead, possessed or sold powder cocaine. That's the non-sensical and costly result of Congress' panic over the crack epidemic of the 1980s and 1990s - and one that has profoundly unjust consequences since blacks were more likely to use crack and whites more likely to use powder cocaine. In 2010, Congress acted to reduce that disparity in mandatory minimum sentences, but that did no good for all the people already in prison.
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