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NEWS
July 25, 1997
IN HIS 34 years on the United States Supreme Court, Justice William J. Brennan made his presence felt in many ways. Appointed by President Dwight Eisenhower, a Republican, Justice Brennan became an influential liberal, writing more opinions than any justice in the court's history except for the prolific Justice William O. Douglas.His opinions shaped key areas of the law, especially individual rights. From the principle of "one person, one vote," which has guided reapportionment of legislative and congressional districts, to access for prisoners, the poor and the disabled to legal remedies for discrimination or unconstitutional treatment, Justice Brennan's decisions reflected an unshakable belief that the liberties enshrined in the Bill of Rights take precedence over the prerogatives or convenience of government.
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NEWS
By Linda R. Monk | October 26, 1999
THE STATE of Florida is getting squeamish about electrocuting murderers. Last month, the Florida Supreme Court released an opinion complete with color photos of the executed body of Allen Lee "Tiny" Davis, his blood-soaked shirt and contorted purple face downloaded to any curious citizen via the court's Web site.During oral arguments on the case, Provenzano vs. Moore, Justice Harry Lee Anstead asked an attorney for the state: "Can you hold that picture up to the people of the state of Florida and say this is what we want to do when we are taking a person's life as a result of a heinous crime?"
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NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Sun staff writer Sandy Banisky and contributing writer Joe Mathews contributed to this article | July 25, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Retired Supreme Court Justice William J. Brennan Jr., often considered the most influential justice of the past half-century and clearly its strongest champion of individual rights, died yesterday at age 91.That rarest of judges, mixing the deep-thinking detachment and originality of a legal scholar with the deal-making wiles of an Irish politician, Justice Brennan had worked tirelessly behind the scenes to mold much of modern constitutional history.He...
NEWS
July 25, 1997
IN HIS 34 years on the United States Supreme Court, Justice William J. Brennan made his presence felt in many ways. Appointed by President Dwight Eisenhower, a Republican, Justice Brennan became an influential liberal, writing more opinions than any justice in the court's history except for the prolific Justice William O. Douglas.His opinions shaped key areas of the law, especially individual rights. From the principle of "one person, one vote," which has guided reapportionment of legislative and congressional districts, to access for prisoners, the poor and the disabled to legal remedies for discrimination or unconstitutional treatment, Justice Brennan's decisions reflected an unshakable belief that the liberties enshrined in the Bill of Rights take precedence over the prerogatives or convenience of government.
NEWS
By W. SHEPHERDSON ABELL | September 3, 1991
Chevy Chase. -- Before the critics of Judge Thomas positively faint away at the thought of ''natural law'' jurisprudence, it might be useful to recall the thoughts of some recent justices on the subject.Exhibit A is a speech given by former Justice William Brennan in 1980 at the dedication of the University of Maryland Law School library, named in honor of Justice Thurgood Marshall. (Justice Marshall had declined to attend the ceremony on the very reasonable grounds that the same law school had denied him admission 50 years earlier.
NEWS
By James J. Kilpatrick | October 9, 1990
THIRTY-ODD years ago, Eric Sevareid of CBS recorded an interview with Justice Hugo Black. Today, in the week that will see David Souter succeeding William Brennan on the U.S. Supreme Court, one telling moment of that interview may usefully be recalled.Only a few years before the interview, the court had decided Brown v. Board of Education. In that landmark case, a unanimous court put an end to state laws enforcing racial segregation. Sevareid gently needled his subject. After all, he noted, 60 years had elapsed between the Plessy case of 1896, upholding the rule of ''separate but equal,'' and the Brown case of 1954, in which the rule was summarily abandoned.
NEWS
By JAMES J. KILPATRICK | December 27, 1994
Which quality in a judge has the greater value -- judicial compassion or judicial restraint?It is an old question, rooted in the distinction between justice, which is one thing, and law, which may be quite another. In the wake of California's referendum last month, the courts are about to revisit the issue. The state voted to deny certain public benefits, most notably public education, to immigrants who have entered the state unlawfully.Opponents have filed suit, but for the time being everything is on hold.
NEWS
September 22, 1990
I RECENTLY wrote here that an oft-repeated Dwight Eisenhower quote about Justice William Brennan was not believable.In answer to the question, "Did you make any mistakes while president?", Ike is said to have answered, "Yes, two, and they are both sitting on the Supreme Court." Meaning Earl Warren and Brennan.I said I didn't believe it because archivists at the Eisenhower Library had never been able to verify it. Snuffy Berkov of Ocean Pines sent me a clipping from the New Yorker of last March 12 -- a profile of Justice Brennan by Nat Hentoff.
NEWS
January 26, 1993
Much of the commentary on the death of Justice Thurgood Marshall has paid full tribute to his historic significance but rated his service on the Supreme Court as merely average. We ourselves would rate Justice Marshall well above average.This is not just pride in a native son. There is more to a justice than votes and written opinions. Thurgood Marshall made an immense, unique contribution to many of the decisions other justices wrote. He did this in pre-opinion conferences and draft briefs.
NEWS
By Linda R. Monk | October 26, 1999
THE STATE of Florida is getting squeamish about electrocuting murderers. Last month, the Florida Supreme Court released an opinion complete with color photos of the executed body of Allen Lee "Tiny" Davis, his blood-soaked shirt and contorted purple face downloaded to any curious citizen via the court's Web site.During oral arguments on the case, Provenzano vs. Moore, Justice Harry Lee Anstead asked an attorney for the state: "Can you hold that picture up to the people of the state of Florida and say this is what we want to do when we are taking a person's life as a result of a heinous crime?"
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Sun staff writer Sandy Banisky and contributing writer Joe Mathews contributed to this article | July 25, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Retired Supreme Court Justice William J. Brennan Jr., often considered the most influential justice of the past half-century and clearly its strongest champion of individual rights, died yesterday at age 91.That rarest of judges, mixing the deep-thinking detachment and originality of a legal scholar with the deal-making wiles of an Irish politician, Justice Brennan had worked tirelessly behind the scenes to mold much of modern constitutional history.He...
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1996
Prefer your skit comedy with a distinctly 1970s flavor? Then check out the Family Channel tonight, as it brings back a pair of vintage variety/talk shows."
NEWS
By JAMES J. KILPATRICK | December 27, 1994
Which quality in a judge has the greater value -- judicial compassion or judicial restraint?It is an old question, rooted in the distinction between justice, which is one thing, and law, which may be quite another. In the wake of California's referendum last month, the courts are about to revisit the issue. The state voted to deny certain public benefits, most notably public education, to immigrants who have entered the state unlawfully.Opponents have filed suit, but for the time being everything is on hold.
NEWS
January 26, 1993
Much of the commentary on the death of Justice Thurgood Marshall has paid full tribute to his historic significance but rated his service on the Supreme Court as merely average. We ourselves would rate Justice Marshall well above average.This is not just pride in a native son. There is more to a justice than votes and written opinions. Thurgood Marshall made an immense, unique contribution to many of the decisions other justices wrote. He did this in pre-opinion conferences and draft briefs.
NEWS
By JAMES J. KILPATRICK | July 9, 1992
Washington. -- The Supreme Court folded up shop on June 29, leaving behind a remarkably unremarkable record for the 1991 term. Of the 108 opinions handed down, only one could be scored as much of a surprise. Otherwise it was mostly the same old fives and fours.The surprise, at least to some observers, came on June 24 in a case involving prayers at public school commencements. It was a close call.In times past the court has found nothing unconstitutional in prayers by legislative chaplains.
NEWS
By W. SHEPHERDSON ABELL | September 3, 1991
Chevy Chase. -- Before the critics of Judge Thomas positively faint away at the thought of ''natural law'' jurisprudence, it might be useful to recall the thoughts of some recent justices on the subject.Exhibit A is a speech given by former Justice William Brennan in 1980 at the dedication of the University of Maryland Law School library, named in honor of Justice Thurgood Marshall. (Justice Marshall had declined to attend the ceremony on the very reasonable grounds that the same law school had denied him admission 50 years earlier.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1996
Prefer your skit comedy with a distinctly 1970s flavor? Then check out the Family Channel tonight, as it brings back a pair of vintage variety/talk shows."
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 1, 1990
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court walks through its red velvet curtains today into a new era -- crossing a historic divide marked by a profound change in its membership and by a choice of whether to shut down, in whole or part, two of America's boldest constitutional experiments.Because of the switch in membership, there is a realistic chance -- the first in history -- that the court now assembling could curtail drastically the power of courts to deal with abortion and school desegregation, leaving those problems mainly to state and local officials.
NEWS
By James J. Kilpatrick | October 9, 1990
THIRTY-ODD years ago, Eric Sevareid of CBS recorded an interview with Justice Hugo Black. Today, in the week that will see David Souter succeeding William Brennan on the U.S. Supreme Court, one telling moment of that interview may usefully be recalled.Only a few years before the interview, the court had decided Brown v. Board of Education. In that landmark case, a unanimous court put an end to state laws enforcing racial segregation. Sevareid gently needled his subject. After all, he noted, 60 years had elapsed between the Plessy case of 1896, upholding the rule of ''separate but equal,'' and the Brown case of 1954, in which the rule was summarily abandoned.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 1, 1990
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court walks through its red velvet curtains today into a new era -- crossing a historic divide marked by a profound change in its membership and by a choice of whether to shut down, in whole or part, two of America's boldest constitutional experiments.Because of the switch in membership, there is a realistic chance -- the first in history -- that the court now assembling could curtail drastically the power of courts to deal with abortion and school desegregation, leaving those problems mainly to state and local officials.
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