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By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2013
In November 2006, Glenn Weinberg appeared a healthy and hearty 50-year-old, who exercised regularly and was fully engaged in the competitive world of real estate development as a partner of the Baltimore-based Cordish Co. But he scaled everything back after a cardiologist - Dr. Mark Midei - falsely led him to believe he had severe coronary artery disease and placed three expensive stents in his body that month, according to a lawsuit filed in...
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NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | September 26, 2013
A 19-year-old member of the Howard County Grand Jury was arrested Wednesday after he allegedly photographed an undercover police officer testifying during the proceedings, according to a State's Attorney spokesman. Julian Warren Hudson, of the 4900 block of Webbed Foot Way in Ellicott City, was escorted from the grand jury meeting room, located within the Howard County State's Attorney's offices in Ellicott City, and charged with violating the grand jury secrecy law and reckless endangerment, both misdemeanors.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2013
Despite numerous marriage equality-related cases currently making their way through the judicial system, it's somehow the hot-button area of antitrust law where an important LGBT rights issue is taking place. The Associated Press reported Wednesday that the battle between two dueling pharmaceutical companies over an AIDS drug has sparked a debate over whether gay men and lesbians can be removed from juries due to their sexual orientations. The case (SmithKline Beecham Corp.
NEWS
August 12, 2013
The Baltimore City Council is scheduled to hold at least preliminary debate on $107 million in tax increment financing for the Harbor Point development today, and whenever the final vote occurs, the outcome is not much in doubt.  Despite an unusual amount of public criticism of the city's support for this project, there has in fact been little question that it would be approved since the mayor stood with the City Council president to endorse the deal months ago. Is it a good thing for the city?
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2013
Jurors are expected to begin deliberating Monday whether Karla Porter is guilty of premeditated murder for hiring a man to kill her husband, or of a lesser charge because she was acting in self-defense. Porter, 51, is charged with first-degree murder in the death of her husband of 24 years, William "Ray" Porter. He was shot to death March 1, 2010, at the Towson gas station he owned after prosecutors said his wife offered to pay an Essex man $9,000. The hit man, William Bishop, was previously convicted in the murder and is serving a life sentence.
NEWS
By C. Philip Nichols Jr | August 7, 2013
This is a report from juror No. 26. I was recently summoned to jury service for the first time in my life. While I have presided over 518 jury trials, this was my first time on the other side of the bench. They start early - 7:30 a.m. There is a lot of hurry up and wait. Those who are veterans understand clearly what that means. Exemptions: By law, there are a couple of ways off jury service. For example, if you are over 70, a member of the organized militia (the Maryland National Guard)
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2013
Jury selection is scheduled to begin Monday in the trial of a White Marsh woman charged with ordering the death of her husband at a Towson gas station three years ago. Karla Porter, 51, could be sentenced to life without the possibility of parole if she is convicted. She had been the only defendant in Baltimore County facing the possibility of execution - but that option is gone with the state's repeal of capital punishment this year. Porter and her husband, 49-year-old William "Ray" Porter, owned the Hess gas station on Joppa Road.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2013
For more than three decades, a Maryland Court of Appeals judge argued that the state's jury instructions were fundamentally unfair, writing blistering dissenting opinions. But it was only in retirement — called back to hear the case of convicted cop killer and serial escape artist Merle Unger — that Judge John C. Eldridge found himself writing for the majority, penning a decision that has already seen 13 convicted murderers set free and could lead to as many as 200 people getting new trials.
NEWS
July 20, 2013
The jurors in George Zimmerman's trial for the murder of Trayvon Martin claim they followed the rule of law in their acquittal. Let's set aside for the moment the flagrant abuses allowed under Florida's "Stand Your Ground" law and focus instead on the rule of common sense. There is such a rule: evidence stating what a reasonable person considers as truth. Mr. Zimmerman's acquittal turned on the claim of self-defense, imminent bodily harm and a fear for his life. When you consider an unarmed teenager being stalked by an individual appearing out of the darkness, who had a better reason to fear bodily harm?
NEWS
July 16, 2013
Am I to believe that the jury and the judicial system themselves are now under indictment following the verdict in the George Zimmerman case ("Martin verdict fires debate," July 15)? A jury has to navigate the difficult waters between what the law and the evidence require for conviction. It would seem logical that the initial perpetrator in this case is obvious. Anyone would be concerned if someone began following them for no justifiable reason. So who was threatening whom?
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