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By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2014
The U.S. Navy has demoted the master diver of the Navy company that lost two men in a training dive last February in Aberdeen, according to The Virginan-Pilot. A Navy jury found that Senior Chief Petty Officer James Burger negligently failed to ensure proper safety procedures were adhered to, the newspaper reported. On Saturday, the jury reduced Burger one rank to chief petty officer. Navy Diver 1st Class James Reyher, 29, and Diver 2nd Class Ryan Harris, 22, drowned Feb. 26 while training at the "Super Pond" at Aberdeen Proving Ground.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2014
A Baltimore jury on Tuesday awarded $50,000 to a West Baltimore boy who said he was wrongly arrested more than two years ago, according to court records. The boy, who was 13 at the time, claimed he was assaulted by officers and arrested, then let go, then re-arrested when he sought medical treatment and was handcuffed to a hospital bed. No charges were ever filed against him, according to the complaint. While the jury didn't find THAT officers had assaulted the boy, according to his attorney, C. Justin Brown, court records show THAT jurors did award damages in the case against Officer Dale Mattingly Jr. The victim's mother, Nicole Young, said she was pleased with the verdict, though her son remains fearful of police.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
A driver who struck and killed a bicyclist in Davidsonville in August will not face criminal manslaughter charges, an Anne Arundel County grand jury decided on Friday. Whitney Decesaris, 37, of Calvert County, will instead be cited for four traffic violations in the death of Trish Cunningham, 50, an assistant track and field and cross country coach at Annapolis High School. "I'm very disappointed," said Cunningham's daughter, Morgan, 21. "I just hoped [her death] would mean more than four traffic tickets.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2013
Members of a Baltimore jury were reminded on Thursday to act civil toward each other as they continue to deliberate a murder and murder conspiracy trial that has kept them in close quarters for four days. Thursday afternoon, a jury of eight black women, two black men, a white man and a white woman walked into the Baltimore City Circuit Judge Emanuel Brown's courtroom and sat down for a lecture on decorum. The jurors had been debating the fates of three men who allegedly reacted to the killing of a family member by taking revenge on people throughout a neighborhood block.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | November 12, 2013
After approximately nine hours of deliberation, the Howard County Circuit Court jury tasked with deciding the fate of the defendant in the Maryland School for the Deaf sex abuse case remains deadlocked, according to deputy Howard County State's Attorney Mary Murphy. The 12-member jury spent all day Tuesday deliberating on the charges against Clarence Cepheus Taylor III, 38, of Baltimore County, who is accused of groping, and in some cases kissing, seven girls while working as an aide at the school's Columbia campus from 2008 to 2011.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | November 8, 2013
The former aide at the  Maryland School for the Deaf  accused of groping seven female students denied the allegations on the witness stand in  Howard County  Circuit Court on Friday. Clarence Taylor III, who is deaf, will have to wait until at least Tuesday for a verdict from the jury, which recessed at 4:30 p.m. Friday, on the seven counts of child sex abuse he is facing. Earlier on Friday, which was the 10th day of the trial, three counts of child pornography were dropped by the State's Attorney's office.
HEALTH
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2013
A Baltimore County judge declared a mistrial Wednesday in the latest malpractice case against former cardiologist Mark Midei and the former owners of St. Joseph Medical Center after jurors failed to agree on how much the plaintiff deserved in damages. The decision came after four days of tense deliberation among jurors who listened to six weeks of proceedings in the case. Baltimore developer Glenn Weinberg alleged that he scaled back his career and lost millions of dollars after the cardiologist wrongly led him to believe that he suffered from severe coronary artery disease and placed unnecessary stents in his heart.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2013
Lawyers for Baltimore businessman Glenn Weinberg told a jury Friday he missed out on making millions of dollars from the Maryland Live casino when he retired early after being wrongly told he had severely blocked heart arteries. But attorneys for former St. Joseph Medical Center cardiologist Mark Midei said Weinberg quit working at the Cordish Co. development firm because he didn't like his job and would not have been guaranteed a big payout from the Cordish-owned casino even if he had stayed.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2013
A string of acquittals for a man accused of raping several Baltimore women has renewed a debate over whether the law should be changed to help prosecutors secure sex offense convictions. Nelson Bernard Clifford, 35, has been cleared in four trials in Baltimore City Circuit Court since 2011. Each time his accusers have testified, but Clifford has said in court that all his encounters were consensual. Prosecutors have attempted in various ways to show juries a pattern, but have been stymied by city judges, who have rejected attempts by prosecutors to join separate cases together, or to call witnesses to testify about assaults other than the one being tried.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
A prominent Baltimore businessman said he lost millions of dollars when he chose to retire early after being led to believe he suffered from severe coronary disease. Glenn Weinberg, a former partner of the Baltimore-based Cordish Co., said he retired after three stents were placed in his heart at St. Joseph Medical Center by former cardiologist Mark Midei. But attorneys for Midei and the hospital's former owners said the stents were necessary and meant to improve the plaintiff's health so he could carry on normal activities, such as his career.
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