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By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2012
A Baltimore jury on Monday afternoon acquitted Keith X. Holly Jr., 23, who was accused of murdering James Ingram, 46, two years ago. Holly had denied committing the crime, and his public defender argued that it was committed by another man, Donte Collins, who has since been killed. The state's case "just doesn't make sense," said Denise Winston, the defender, during closing arguments. Prosecutors relied on the testimony of Renee Barnes, Collins' mother and a longtime friend of Ingram's; Yvette Edwards, a neighbor; and Latia Moses, Collins' girlfriend and the mother of his child.
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NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2010
The sheet of paper handed to the jury forewoman contained a list of seven items. In the first six, the panel was asked to consider guilt or innocence in matters of murder, assault and use of a handgun. The seventh went to the heart of the case: Is the defendant criminally responsible? As the murder trial of Mary C. Koontz drew closer to the finish line Tuesday, the question of the 60-year-old defendant's sanity occupied almost the entirety of her attorney's 90-minute closing argument.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2010
After deliberating for 15 hours over three days, a Baltimore County jury rejected a 60-year-old woman's insanity defense on Thursday and found her guilty of shooting her estranged husband to death and of trying to kill their teenage daughter. Mary C. Koontz, a former English teacher at Sparrows Point High School, showed no visible reaction in the tense courtroom as the jury's forewoman declared her "guilty" of each of six counts — including first-degree murder, attempted first-degree murder and assault — and answered "yes" to a final question, which asked whether the defendant was criminally responsible for the crimes.
NEWS
April 14, 1993
When Rep. Harold Ford, the black Memphis Democrat, was charging that he could not get a fair trial from a federal jury of 11 whites and one black all chosen from outside his city, we said here, "There are studies showing a correlation between the races of jurors and their verdicts, but the trend is away from that. The jury in this case can give Representative Ford a fair trial, we believe."It did. Last Friday he was acquitted of all 18 counts of fraud and conspiracy. The verdict on the jury is clearly "not guilty of racism."
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | September 16, 1994
After listening to more than two dozen witnesses over nearly three weeks, the jury in Jason Aaron DeLong's first-degree murder trial began deliberating yesterday.The panel of nine women and three men was sent to the jury room with two sharply different pictures of why Mr. DeLong stabbed his mother and her boyfriend last summer.Since the trial began Aug. 23, the Carroll Circuit Court jury has known that Mr. DeLong, 19, of Westminster admitted to the killings of Cathryn Brace Farrar and George William Wahl in that city.
NEWS
July 16, 2013
Am I to believe that the jury and the judicial system themselves are now under indictment following the verdict in the George Zimmerman case ("Martin verdict fires debate," July 15)? A jury has to navigate the difficult waters between what the law and the evidence require for conviction. It would seem logical that the initial perpetrator in this case is obvious. Anyone would be concerned if someone began following them for no justifiable reason. So who was threatening whom?
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2010
A Baltimore County jury found a former military corpsman guilty Thursday of first-degree murder, first-degree assault and other charges in connection with the beating death of a man last year in the men's room of a Catonsville bar. Testimony in Benjamin W. Shorter's trial wrapped up Wednesday, after a visit by the jury to Morsberger's Tavern, where Franklin J. Schissler died March 29, 2009, of what an autopsy determined was a heart attack caused...
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2011
After a two-week trial that traced a failing marriage's path from disharmony to a vicious killing, a former community activist in Northeast Baltimore was found guilty Friday of first-degree murder in the fatal stabbing of his pregnant wife in 2008. The jury also convicted Cleaven L. Williams Jr. of a dangerous-weapon charge in the death of Veronica Williams, with whom he had three children. Their relationship, testimony showed, was fast disintegrating in the weeks before she was attacked.
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