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Jury Selection

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By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | May 18, 1993
Bernard Eric Miller has lost his first effort to persuade an appellate court to overturn his conviction in the carjacking death last September of Pam Basu.The Maryland Court of Appeals, in a one-paragraph order signed Thursday, denied a petition to reverse Miller's April 23 conviction.But the ruling by Maryland's highest court ended just the first phase of the appeals process for Miller, a 17-year-old from Washington. He will be able to take his case back to the state's appellate courts after Howard Circuit Judge Dennis M. Sweeney sentences him June 29.Laurack D. Bray, who represents the teen-ager, had asked the high court to make an early ruling on the conviction.
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By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
Jury selection begins Friday in the murder trial of Joseph Lamont Walker, a New Jersey police officer accused of the fatal shooting of a Lansdowne man during a road rage incident in Anne Arundel County last summer. The case will go on as scheduled after Judge Michael Wachs dismissed a motion Thursday by Walker's attorneys to have the case dismissed. One hundred and fifty potential jurors have been called to the Anne Arundel Circuit Court in Annapolis for the case, which has drawn attention in law enforcement circles.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2011
Jury selection and more pretrial motions are expected to take most – if not all – of Wednesday when the prosecution of Travers and Tremaine Johnson, twins charged with animal cruelty, resumes in a Baltimore courtroom. Much of Monday was taken up with motions on what evidence and testimony jurors will be allowed to consider. Baltimore City Circuit Court Judge Lawrence P. Fletcher-Hill ruled that a woman who identified the brothers to police can testify. In addition, prosecutors may use a statement by Travers Johnson to police as well as a city surveillance video.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
Jury selection is scheduled to begin Friday in a court-martial for a Naval Academy midshipman charged with sexually assaulting a classmate. Midshipman Joshua Tate is charged with aggravated sexual assault and making false official statements. The jury - called a "panel" in the military justice system - will be comprised of Navy and Marine Corps officers who are stationed in the Washington, D.C. region. The judge in the case, Marine Col. Daniel Daugherty, ordered that the pool of potential panel members be drawn from outside of the academy, as would normally be the case, because of the intense focus on the case and the issue of sexual assault in the military.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
Jury selection is scheduled to begin Friday in a court-martial for a Naval Academy midshipman charged with sexually assaulting a classmate. Midshipman Joshua Tate is charged with aggravated sexual assault and making false official statements. The jury - called a "panel" in the military justice system - will be comprised of Navy and Marine Corps officers who are stationed in the Washington, D.C. region. The judge in the case, Marine Col. Daniel Daugherty, ordered that the pool of potential panel members be drawn from outside of the academy, as would normally be the case, because of the intense focus on the case and the issue of sexual assault in the military.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
Jury selection begins Friday in the murder trial of Joseph Lamont Walker, a New Jersey police officer accused of the fatal shooting of a Lansdowne man during a road rage incident in Anne Arundel County last summer. The case will go on as scheduled after Judge Michael Wachs dismissed a motion Thursday by Walker's attorneys to have the case dismissed. One hundred and fifty potential jurors have been called to the Anne Arundel Circuit Court in Annapolis for the case, which has drawn attention in law enforcement circles.
NEWS
February 2, 2010
Jury selection went past the normal workday in the trial of a 20-year-old man charged in the deaths of eight people who had gathered to watch an illegal street race. Authorities say Tavon Taylor and his friend were racing when they came upon a crowd watching another race in rural southern Prince George's County. The other car, driven by Darren Bullock, plowed into the spectators and ended up down an embankment with one of the victims inside. Bullock pleaded guilty last week to eight counts of vehicular manslaughter and faces 15 years in prison.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | October 9, 2009
Baltimore Circuit Judge Wanda K. Heard knew it would be difficult to find a panel of jurors who hadn't heard about the case of Mark Castillo, who is charged with murder in the drowning deaths of his three children at an Inner Harbor hotel last year. But if Thursday was an indicator, it might just be impossible. Jury selection began about 10:30 a.m., when 145 people filed into Room 400 of the Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. Courthouse, two floors down from Heard's usual courtroom and at least two times bigger.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz | julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | November 9, 2009
Today begins the process of choosing 12 Baltimore residents who will decide whether or not their mayor is a criminal. As Sheila Dixon's theft trial gets under way, jury selection is not only the curtain-raiser, but also, perhaps, the most important act, according to experts and lawyers not involved in the case. Race and politics will play critical roles, outside observers say. Dixon's defense team will want jurors who like their mayor and the work she has done, while prosecutors are apt to favor those who will dispassionately review the evidence they present, the observers say. Dixon, an African-American woman born and raised in West Baltimore, leads a majority-black, heavily Democratic city.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | liz.kay@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 22, 2010
Jury selection will begin Wednesday for the firearms possession trial of twin brothers accused of setting fire to a pit bull in May. Travers and Tremayne Johnson, both 18, and their father, Charles Johnson, 76, were charged in June with possession of firearms and marijuana. Police say the drugs and weapons were found that month in a raid of the Johnsons' South Pulaski Street home while investigating the dog burning. Prosecutors plan to handle the firearm case before the animal cruelty charges, which drew nationwide attention.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2013
In November 2006, Glenn Weinberg appeared a healthy and hearty 50-year-old, who exercised regularly and was fully engaged in the competitive world of real estate development as a partner of the Baltimore-based Cordish Co. But he scaled everything back after a cardiologist - Dr. Mark Midei - falsely led him to believe he had severe coronary artery disease and placed three expensive stents in his body that month, according to a lawsuit filed in...
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2013
Despite numerous marriage equality-related cases currently making their way through the judicial system, it's somehow the hot-button area of antitrust law where an important LGBT rights issue is taking place. The Associated Press reported Wednesday that the battle between two dueling pharmaceutical companies over an AIDS drug has sparked a debate over whether gay men and lesbians can be removed from juries due to their sexual orientations. The case (SmithKline Beecham Corp.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2013
Jury selection is scheduled to begin Monday in the trial of a White Marsh woman charged with ordering the death of her husband at a Towson gas station three years ago. Karla Porter, 51, could be sentenced to life without the possibility of parole if she is convicted. She had been the only defendant in Baltimore County facing the possibility of execution - but that option is gone with the state's repeal of capital punishment this year. Porter and her husband, 49-year-old William "Ray" Porter, owned the Hess gas station on Joppa Road.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | April 6, 2013
Nothing, besides the approach of a snowstorm or a rush-hour fender-bender on the Beltway, elicits more groans from Baltimoreans than the summons to jury duty, and I'm not sure why, except that we like to bellyache about stuff. When you think about it, we're not asked to do that much as citizens - separate trash from recyclables and set them on the curb, vote every couple of years, pay our taxes on time, sit on a jury once in a great while (more frequently if you live in the city)
NEWS
March 21, 2013
I served jury duty in Baltimore City recently, an annual event and my civic duty. It's inconvenient and thankless but necessary to be sure that people get the fair treatment that they're guaranteed by the Constitution. But what about the jurors? Where's the fair treatment for them? There is little information provided about what's OK to bring in and what isn't, either on the juror web site or in the summons. Weapons are forbidden (well, duh) as are knitting needles. Crochet needles are on the list of banned items, but I wrote that off as a mistake made by someone who doesn't know that crochet requires the use of hooks that are, by definition, not pointy.
NEWS
By Alison Matas, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2013
A panel of jurors took their seats Monday in the trial of a man accused of nearly beheading three children nine years ago. Prosecutors say Policarpio Espinoza Perez, a 31-year-old illegal immigrant from Mexico, slashed the throats of three children ages 8, 9 and 10 in 2004 in a Baltimore apartment in the 7000 block of Park Heights Ave. Perez has been on trial for the murders twice before, both times with Adan Canela, 26, who is also accused of...
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2012
Jury selection began Wednesday in the retrial of Travers and Tremayne Johnson, brothers accused of setting fire to a pit bull, and it was expected to be a challenge given media coverage of the case. Baltimore Circuit Judge Emanuel Brown called a pool of about 80 potential jurors, about 40 more than usual, because he expects many to be disqualified for having previous knowledge of or opinions on the case. A hung jury caused a mistrial in 2011, covered extensively in newspapers and on local television.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2011
Jury selection is set to begin Monday in the second animal-cruelty trial of Travers and Tremayne Johnson, twin brothers accused of setting fire to a pit bull in 2009. Their first trial was held in February and ended in a hung jury after three days of deliberation, with 11 members voting to convict and a single holdout saying she was unsure of the brothers' guilt. They're accused of dousing a young female pit bull in accelerant in May 2009, setting her alight and leaving her for dead on a West Baltimore street.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2013
Attorneys likely will begin laying out their cases before week's end in the criminal trial of Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold, who is accused of using taxpayer-funded police officers for his personal and political benefit. Leopold on Thursday waived his right to a jury trial, which means the case will be heard and decided by Circuit Judge Dennis M. Sweeney. The decision came after the trial opened Thursday with a day of jury selection. Leopold, 69, was indicted last March on four counts of misconduct in office and one count of fraudulent misappropriation by a fiduciary.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2013
The defense team for Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold is fighting prosecutors' move to block it from obtaining documents it claims would show the "same conduct" as that in criminal charges against Leopold has not been prosecuted before, showing inconsistencies in when charges are filed. The remarks come in a court filing this week in a dispute between the Office of the State Prosecutor and the defense. The defense wants material it argues goes to the heart of legal issues it is raising in the trial scheduled to begin Wednesday with jury selection.
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