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By Jean Marbella | jean.marbella@baltsun.com | November 21, 2009
I was ready to hand over my tickets to the Springsteen concert and tell them, "You need these more than I do, have a blast." If only I had 12 to Sunday's Ravens game. "Do something nice," Judge Dennis M. Sweeney told the jurors in Mayor Sheila Dixon's criminal trial as he released them Friday for the weekend. "Take your mind off this." It was the second afternoon in a row that the jury had sent out from behind the closed doors of their deliberation room a veritable message in a bottle.
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NEWS
By C. Philip Nichols Jr | August 7, 2013
This is a report from juror No. 26. I was recently summoned to jury service for the first time in my life. While I have presided over 518 jury trials, this was my first time on the other side of the bench. They start early - 7:30 a.m. There is a lot of hurry up and wait. Those who are veterans understand clearly what that means. Exemptions: By law, there are a couple of ways off jury service. For example, if you are over 70, a member of the organized militia (the Maryland National Guard)
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NEWS
By Jean Marbella | jean.marbella@baltsun.com | November 24, 2009
I 'm sure there will be a verdict today. But then, I thought there was going to be one Monday, too. The day had started on a positive note - literally. After the two previous days of deliberations in Mayor Sheila Dixon's criminal trial had ended with jurors referring to tensions and asking to go home, the first note from the jury room Monday morning cheerily noted "great progress." Maybe it was just the nicotine withdrawal talking: The juror said he and his fellow members needed a short break - to think, to get a breath of fresh air and, in his and at least three other cases, to grab a cigarette.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | May 26, 2011
Someone called to testify Wednesday before the grand jury looking into the Ehrlich campaign's deceptive Election Day robocalls tells me Towson attorney Robert B. Green was in the waiting room, offering to consult with any witnesses connected to the campaign. I phoned Green, and his partner, David B. Irwin , took the call. “My firm represents the Bob Ehrlich for Maryland Committee, that's what I can tell you,” said Irwin, a former federal prosecutor and white-collar criminal defense lawyer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | david.zurawik@baltsun.com | November 29, 2009
I f the debate among the jury in the Sheila Dixon trial sounds anything like what's transpiring on Baltimore's talk-radio airwaves, it is no wonder that a verdict hasn't be reached. After weeks of passionate debate, talk-show hosts across the dial report only "deepening" divides and "50-50 splits" among listeners. "As the jury has stayed out longer and longer, the divide that I have been hearing from my callers has only become much more firm," says Clarence Mitchell IV, who is known to his WBAL radio audience as C4. "When this is over … we are going to find it was a direct reflection of what we have been hearing on the radio in recent days - a passionate, intense, complicated and deeply divided conversation."
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | November 29, 2002
WASHINGTON -- With all the trash on television, it's hard not to applaud any effort by a serious program like PBS' Frontline to educate the viewing public about the American system's most vital functions, including the sacrosanct constitutional right of trial by jury. But the show is enduring slings and arrows after obtaining approval from the mother of Cedric Harrison, 17, accused of murder in Texas, to put its cameras in the jury room where his fate will be decided, including the possibility of a death sentence if he is found guilty.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun theater critic | October 26, 2006
"You couldn't change my mind if you talked for a hundred years," a character insists in Twelve Angry Men. But minds were made to be changed, and that's exactly what happens in Reginald Rose's play. How and why it happens forms the action of this jury room drama, which got its start as a 1954 teleplay, was turned into a 1957 movie (starring Henry Fonda) and finally made its Broadway debut two years ago. Twelve Angry Men continues through Nov. 5 at the Hippodrome Theatre, 12 N. Eutaw St. $27-$67.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2004
While deliberating in a first-degree murder case yesterday, Baltimore jurors were escorted from the jury room to the courtroom to watch a videotape of trial testimony they had requested to see. When they returned three hours later, they made a discovery as shocking as some courtroom evidence. A thief had gotten into the locked jury room and stolen their money, cellular telephones and car keys. "They were angry, hot, livid," said lawyer Warren A. Brown, who was in the courtroom on another matter.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella | jean.marbella@baltsun.com | November 25, 2009
S omeday in a future that seems to grow more distant by the day, there presumably will be a verdict. Maybe not until there's snow on the ground, it can seem as we wait and then wait some more, but if and when jurors decide the fate of Mayor Sheila Dixon, I'll look back and think: Ah, this was the turning point. After days of sending out notes that signaled turmoil among their ranks followed by ones indicating progress, the jurors fell silent on Tuesday. There were no questions about legal definitions, no temperature readings of their discussions, not even a really-need-a-smoke bit of comic relief.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 29, 1998
A Baltimore Circuit Court judge has thrown out a $1.7 million jury award and ordered a new trial in a lead poisoning case after jurors admitted they read a newspaper article about lead poisoning inadvertently slipped into the jury room.Judge Richard T. Rombro threw out the verdict awarded Monday to Melissa Williams of Baltimore after several jurors admitted reading an article in the Baltimore Times brought into the jury room several days before the weeklong trial ended."It's really a shame," said Terrence C. McAndrews, who represented the defendant landlords, Larry and Joann Wilson of Upper Marlboro and TEMA Inc., the Baltimore company that managed the rowhouse where the child lived.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | December 1, 2009
The doors weren't slamming, but Day Six of jury deliberations in Mayor Sheila Dixon's trial ended something like a French farce, with clerks entering and exiting the courtroom bearing crisscrossing notes and resulting in just-missed connections. Sometimes cliches are true: Timing really is everything. Just as the judge was sending a response to a jury note, the jurors were sending a second note back to him. Had they just been a little more patient and waited to get the judge's response to Note One before firing off Note Two, we would have had the answer to a very interesting question: Has the jury reached a decision on any of the five counts against Dixon?
NEWS
By Jean Marbella | jean.marbella@baltsun.com | December 1, 2009
T he doors weren't slamming, but Day Six of jury deliberations in Mayor Sheila Dixon's trial ended something like a French farce, with clerks entering and exiting the courtroom bearing crisscrossing notes and resulting in just-missed connections. Sometimes cliches are true: Timing really is everything. Just as the judge was sending a response to a jury note, the jurors were sending a second note back to him. Had they just been a little more patient and waited to get the judge's response to Note One before firing off Note Two, we would have had the answer to a very interesting question: Has the jury reached a decision on any of the five counts against Dixon?
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK | November 29, 2009
If the debate among the jury in the Sheila Dixon trial sounds anything like what's transpiring on Baltimore's talk-radio airwaves, it is no wonder that a verdict hasn't be reached. After weeks of passionate debate, talk-show hosts across the dial report only "deepening" divides and "50-50 splits" among listeners. "As the jury has stayed out longer and longer, the divide that I have been hearing from my callers has only become much more firm," says Clarence Mitchell IV, who is known to his WBAL radio audience as C4. "When this is over ... we are going to find it was a direct reflection of what we have been hearing on the radio in recent days - a passionate, intense, complicated and deeply divided conversation."
NEWS
By Jean Marbella | jean.marbella@baltsun.com | November 25, 2009
S omeday in a future that seems to grow more distant by the day, there presumably will be a verdict. Maybe not until there's snow on the ground, it can seem as we wait and then wait some more, but if and when jurors decide the fate of Mayor Sheila Dixon, I'll look back and think: Ah, this was the turning point. After days of sending out notes that signaled turmoil among their ranks followed by ones indicating progress, the jurors fell silent on Tuesday. There were no questions about legal definitions, no temperature readings of their discussions, not even a really-need-a-smoke bit of comic relief.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | November 24, 2009
I'm sure there will be a verdict today. But then, I thought there was going to be one Monday, too. The day had started on a positive note - literally. After the two previous days of deliberations in Mayor Sheila Dixon's criminal trial had ended with jurors referring to tensions and asking to go home, the first note from the jury room Monday morning cheerily noted "great progress." Maybe it was just the nicotine withdrawal talking: The juror said he and his fellow members needed a short break - to think, to get a breath of fresh air and, in his and at least three other cases, to grab a cigarette.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Julie Bykowicz and Baltimore Sun reporters | November 24, 2009
Jurors in Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon's theft and embezzlement trial are heading into a fourth day of deliberations today but reported Monday that they were making "progress." A note delivered about 4:30 p.m. Monday from the jury forewoman asked Judge Dennis M. Sweeney to dismiss jurors for the day but also said, "We are making progress." "My suggestion is that we follow the jury's lead," Sweeney said, and instructed the nine women and three men to return at 9 a.m. today.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun reporter | June 24, 2008
The state prosecutor's office questioned at least three people yesterday in its investigation into contracting practices at City Hall, including Patrick Turner, president of Turner Development Group, which is developing a residential community called Silo Point in South Baltimore. Turner arrived at the grand jury room at the Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. Courthouse about 2 p.m. He left about an hour later. He told a reporter that he was "speaking with someone" in the jury room. He declined to give any further details.
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