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By MIKE BURNS | October 8, 2000
ARROGANT. Obstructionist." Yeah, we already knew that. So C. Scott Stone, school board president and principal defender of its misbehavior, had it half-right when he said of the county grand jury report: "I didn't read any new information for us to discuss."
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NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Julie Bykowicz and Annie Linskey and Julie Bykowicz,Annie.Linskey@baltsun.com and Julie.Bykowicz@baltsun.com | November 24, 2009
Jurors in Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon's theft and embezzlement trial are heading into a fourth day of deliberations today but reported Monday that they were making "progress." A note delivered about 4:30 p.m. Monday from the jury forewoman asked Judge Dennis M. Sweeney to dismiss jurors for the day but also said, "We are making progress." "My suggestion is that we follow the jury's lead," Sweeney said, and instructed the nine women and three men to return at 9 a.m. today.
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NEWS
By MIKE BURNS | December 17, 2000
THE STRAW that broke the camel's back or making political hay? That's a lingering question about the 19-month county grand jury investigation of the Carroll school system. The grand jury's interim report in October was replete with proposals for changes in the construction and accounting system -- proposals that had already been publicly raised and discussed at length. Two internal reports, by lawyers and management consultants, preceded the grand jury's interim report. Candidates campaigning for the school board were actively debating the subject.
NEWS
August 19, 2008
Having gratefully escaped being seated on a Baltimore City jury despite multiple summonses for duty, I would have to agree with what Groucho Marx said in a different context: He wouldn't want to belong to any club that would have him as a member. City juries have a less than enviable reputation. You've heard the complaints no doubt, or grumbled a few yourself: Oh, they won't convict anyone. They're made up largely of blacks, and they don't want to send another brother to prison. It's jury nullification, doncha know?
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and David Michael Ettlin and Jay Apperson and David Michael Ettlin,Staff Writers | March 14, 1993
To understand Kenneth Lavon Johnson, the Baltimore judge who commissioned last week's controversial grand jury report blasting the local drug enforcement effort, you have to leave the big East Coast city and go back to the segregated South of lunch-counter sit-ins.From there, you'd go halfway around the world to the Far East, where a black man who now notes that he "couldn't buy a hamburger in Mississippi" served his country during wartime as an Army lawyer. Your next stop would be in Washington, D.C., where this lawyer quit his job in the U.S. Justice Department because he refused to work for a "crook" like then-Attorney General John Mitchell.
NEWS
By Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | November 9, 1994
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- A cigar box filled with crime scene photos and tapes of John Zile's statement to police were among the evidence presented yesterday to the grand jury reviewing Christina Holt's death.The investigation wrapped up late yesterday after all evidence in the death of the 7-year-old girl had been presented to the 18-member panel, said Mike Edmondson, spokesman for the Palm Beach County State Attorney's Office. The grand jury report is expected to be released tomorrow.Medical Examiner James Benz and investigators from the Riviera Beach Police Department and State Attorney's Office appeared before the panel yesterday.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Staff Writer | April 6, 1993
Sparked by a grand jury report that's highly critical of Baltimore's Police Department, the state special prosecutor has requested the department's files on a number of cases, including a 1990 murder investigation in which state Sen. Larry Young was interviewed by detectives.State Special Prosecutor Stephen Montanarelli is investigating a city grand jury's finding that the city Police Department's drug enforcement effort is badly managed and the city state's attorney's office thwarted investigations involving prominent drug suspects.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Staff Writer | March 27, 1993
The state special prosecutor will broaden the investigation of a Baltimore grand jury's findings that the city Police Department's drug enforcement effort is badly managed and the city state's attorney's office thwarted investigations involving prominent drug suspects.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and State's Attorney Stuart O. Simms have assailed the report, calling it shallow and amateurish. But State Prosecutor Stephen Montanarelli decided yesterday that the allegations are serious enough to warrant further investigation.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2000
A week after the release of an interim report from the grand jury investigating possible mismanagement in the county school system, Carroll State's Attorney Jerry F. Barnes gave the school board a verbal lashing and urged it to make "drastic changes" to restore public confidence and get the system back on track. "This is not necessarily a doomsday report, though I do think it should be seen as a distinct wake-up call for this board and the administration of this school system," Barnes said at last night's standing-room-only board meeting.
NEWS
March 31, 1993
It is not pleasant having law enforcement officials investigated by other law enforcement officials. But the alternative is worse: perhaps ignoring misconduct in office.State prosecutor Stephen Montanarelli, looking into allegations against Baltimore police or the city state's attorney's office made by a grand jury that studied narcotics investigations, may not find anything worth pursuing. But if he does file charges, it could prove devastating, especially in a city that already is fighting an uphill battle against the social cancer of drugs and the street wars it unleashes on many of its neighborhoods.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,Sun reporter | September 20, 2005
The state did a poor job of providing medical care to prisoners at Baltimore's downtown prison over much of the past five years because of a flawed and underfunded contract with a private company that took effect in 2000, according to a grand jury report released yesterday. But the report, which supports findings of a Sun investigation published this year, credits the Ehrlich administration for its efforts to come up with an innovative solution to the problems through a new set of medical care contracts that state officials signed in June.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2005
The Anne Arundel County chapter of the NAACP is demanding an investigation into reports that jurors improperly discussed the case of a white Pasadena teenager who was later acquitted of charges in the death of a black teenager in a melee. Gerald Stansbury, president of the Anne Arundel branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, expressed his concerns in a letter to Judge Joseph P. Manck, who presided over the manslaughter trial of Jacob Tyler Fortney, 19. Fortney was acquitted of all charges May 12. Stansbury released his letter to news outlets yesterday - a day before the victim's mother is scheduled to meet with prosecutors to discuss the case.
NEWS
September 17, 2004
FDA allows for use of home defibrillators without prescription WASHINGTON - People worried about sudden cardiac arrest no longer need a doctor's prescription to buy devices that jump-start the heart. The Food and Drug Administration for the first time agreed yesterday to let consumers go online and purchase the $2,000 devices for home use. Some 80 percent of the instances of sudden cardiac arrest, which is best treated by a shock from a defibrillator, happen at home. The FDA endorsed a July recommendation from its advisory panel to remove the prescription requirement after federal advisers were satisfied that people could use the machines safely at home.
NEWS
By MIKE BURNS | December 17, 2000
THE STRAW that broke the camel's back or making political hay? That's a lingering question about the 19-month county grand jury investigation of the Carroll school system. The grand jury's interim report in October was replete with proposals for changes in the construction and accounting system -- proposals that had already been publicly raised and discussed at length. Two internal reports, by lawyers and management consultants, preceded the grand jury's interim report. Candidates campaigning for the school board were actively debating the subject.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | November 14, 2000
Carroll State's Attorney Jerry F. Barnes disclosed yesterday that the county school system was fined $10,000 for building a wastewater treatment plant without state permits, and he implored the county commissioners to keep a close tab on school system spending, warning that failing to do so could lead to a tax increase. Barnes' meeting with the board included a rare show of disagreement between Commissioners Donald I. Dell and Robin Bartlett Frazier, political allies who frequently override board President Julia Walsh Gouge's vote in setting county policy.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2000
A week after the release of an interim report from the grand jury investigating possible mismanagement in the county school system, Carroll State's Attorney Jerry F. Barnes gave the school board a verbal lashing and urged it to make "drastic changes" to restore public confidence and get the system back on track. "This is not necessarily a doomsday report, though I do think it should be seen as a distinct wake-up call for this board and the administration of this school system," Barnes said at last night's standing-room-only board meeting.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Staff Writer | March 12, 1993
Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke voiced concern yesterday that a special grand jury report critical of the city's Police Department and state's attorney's office will leave "a cloud" over the institutions."
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2000
William H. Hyde, former superintendent of Carroll County public schools, returned from Montana and spent 2 1/2 hours yesterday testifying before a special grand jury about possible illegalities stemming from school construction projects during his tenure. Appearing harried, but dapper in a navy blue suit, Hyde dashed from the grand jury room about 3:30 p.m., saying he had no time to comment about his testimony. "I have a medical appointment in five minutes," he said without slowing to answer questions.
NEWS
By MIKE BURNS | October 8, 2000
ARROGANT. Obstructionist." Yeah, we already knew that. So C. Scott Stone, school board president and principal defender of its misbehavior, had it half-right when he said of the county grand jury report: "I didn't read any new information for us to discuss."
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