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By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2012
One of our articles has quoted a gentleman saying "jerry-rigged," and of course we let that stand. Our job is to report what people do and say; making them look good is a flack's task.  But if you wish to be precise, you will observe a distinction between jury-rigged  and jerry-built , even though the two terms are frequently confused.  Any thing that is jury-rigged  is an improvised solution to a problem. It's originally a nautical expression, deriving, the Oxford English Dictionary says, from jury-mast , a temporary mast put up to replace one that has broken off or been swept away.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
A Baltimore County jury found an Anne Arundel County man guilty Monday in the fatal stabbing of a woman he once dated. Jeffrey Shiflett, 35, was convicted of first-degree murder and related offenses in an attack in which he walked into Katie Hadel's Garrison apartment carrying a long knife and stabbed her nearly 30 times in front of her 2-year-old daughter. Hadel was under police protection at the time of her death after years of harassment and threats from Shiflett. As the verdict was read, Hadel's mother had tears in her eyes.
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2012
A Baltimore jury convicted a 31-year-old man Wednesday of child sexual abuse for "repeatedly attacking" a 10-year-old girl in 2010, the Baltimore State's Attorney's office announced. George H. Jones Jr., of the 4200 block of W. Rogers Ave., faces a maximum of 170 years in prison at his sentencing, set for April 16. tricia.bishop@baltsun.com
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
A Baltimore jury has awarded nearly $2.1 million to a 17-year-old city youth who was allegedly poisoned by lead paint in the 1990s when he was a toddler in an East Baltimore rental home. The judgment against Elliot Dackman and the estates of Sandra and Bernard Dackman came Friday in Baltimore Circuit Court, at the end of the weeklong trial of a lawsuit brought on behalf of Daquantay Robinson by his mother, Tiesha Robinson. The jury verdict shows the long-running tide of litigation over the widespread use of lead-based paint in Baltimore's older rental housing has yet to ebb, according to Bruce Powell, the Robinsons' lawyer.
NEWS
July 6, 2011
No justice was served for little Caylee Anthony ("Casey Anthony not guilty," July 6). First of all the judge should have realized he's had a jury in hold for 33 days. It was a holiday weekend, the court system could've arranged for them to go somewhere for a family outing with some kind of security for them so facts would not be talked about. Had the court system done that, maybe this jury, tired of being kept in seclusion all that time, might have come back, looked over all the facts more clearly and come back with a different conclusion.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | peter.hermann@baltsun.com | November 22, 2009
P olice have long complained that Baltimore juries don't believe them, especially when it comes to drug busts, making convictions difficult if not near impossible. Residents, especially in the inner city, have long equated the war on drugs with police harassment. So I was elated to be summoned to jury duty Thursday and join a pool of a little more than 60 people - including a homemaker and a physician, a truck driver and a professor, a store clerk and a student, a rabbi's wife and an assistant high school principal, an unemployed man and a college student - for what appeared to be a routine drug case.
NEWS
By Raymond Novak | October 5, 2011
The Supreme Court has embarked on a new term that is widely predicted to be one of its most momentous in many years. But we should not quickly forget one very important First Amendment case decided by the court during its last term — one that may ultimately turn out to have been an important decision limiting the role of the jury as a check on the power of the government. Snyder v. Phelps is a classic case of competing interests: the right of a father to bury his son in peace versus the constitutionally guaranteed right of a group to demonstrate on a public sidewalk.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz | julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | December 1, 2009
Jurors in the theft trial of Sheila Dixon signaled Monday that they were stymied on one or more charges against the Baltimore mayor, then abruptly changed course and asked the judge to let them resume deliberations this morning. The flurry of activity, after six days of discussions and a four-day holiday break, gave no clear indication of where the jurors might be headed. After the jury forewoman dispatched a note declaring that the jurors "can not come to a unanymous[sic]
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | February 1, 2012
Nearly four years ago, Tyrone Lamont Webb Jr. reported his girlfriend missing. This week, a jury convicted the 31-year-old of first-degree murder for shooting her twice in the head. He had been charged in 2009 after the woman's body was found by hunters in the woods in Woodlawn. Mia Nichols, 27, was a mother of three. She had been shot and her body discarded, police said at the time, until her partially clothed skeletal remains were discovered off Dogwood Road near Ridge Road. Nichols had worked for Volunteers of America, where she was last seen on Oct. 28, 2008, nearly a year before her body was found.
NEWS
December 6, 2011
The editors of The Sun clearly would love nothing more than to see any Republican Party officeholder be cast in the light of disgrace, and to have Paul Schurick, longtime aide to former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., convicted of criminal wrongdoing would surely suit you just fine. But as Mr. Schurick's trial neared its conclusion, you apparently felt uneasy about a conviction. With the case to go to the jury on Monday, you clearly attempted to improperly influence the jury and published an online editorial on Friday declaring him guilty of criminal conduct involving "political dirty tricks" ("Schurick trial: Mandel as a character witness?"
NEWS
September 3, 2014
A post-Labor Day start for Maryland public schools is a very good idea ( "Late start a non-starter," Sept. 2). It is also the recommendation of a state task force appointed by Gov. Martin O'Malley and which included public school teachers, parents of students in public elementary, middle and high schools as well as members of the General Assembly. Much like members of a jury, task force members gave full consideration to the positions of supporters and opponents of this concept.
NEWS
By Anne Colt Leitess | August 19, 2014
Editor's note: This article has been updated from an earlier version Criminal trials typically end once the jury returns its verdict. The attorneys move on to their next cases, unless appeal is pursued, and the debate ends. Unfortunately, that has not been the case after the recent trial of State v. Joseph Walker in Anne Arundel County. An Anne Arundel County grand jury indicted the defendant in this case for murder and other offenses after a Maryland State Police investigation revealed strong evidence that the defendant shot and killed an unarmed man during a road rage incident.
NEWS
By Steven H. Levin, Charles N. Curlett Jr. and Michael T. Cornacchia | August 8, 2014
On an evening in June 2013, New Jersey Det. Joseph Walker was driving his minivan along Route 3 near Interstate 97 with his wife and three young children when he accidentally drifted into Joseph Harvey Jr.'s lane of traffic. Harvey, who was with a passenger, Adam Pidel, responded by yelling racial slurs at Detective Walker and his family, who are African-American, and issuing a death threat. Harvey eventually forced the Walkers from the road and sped off only to pull over 50 yards ahead.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
Russell J. White, a retired trial attorney who won an acquittal in a nationally watched case in 1980 in which his client was accused of shooting boys throwing snowballs at his house, died of complications from dementia Wednesday at the Heart Home in Lutherville. The Mays Chapel North resident was 85. "He had a gift that can't be taught in a school. Russ had a wonderful way with juries," said his former law partner, Joseph F. Murphy, who went on to become chief judge of the Court of Special Appeals.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2014
Jurors are set to resume deliberations Wednesday in the case of a New Jersey police officer accused of shooting a man to death last summer on the side of a Millersville highway. Joseph Lamont Walker, 41, is charged with first-degree murder in the death of 36-year-old Joseph Dale Harvey Jr. on Route 3. Walker was driving home from a birthday party for a nephew last June when his car drifted into Harvey's lane. Harvey shouted and swerved toward Walker's car, and both men pulled over.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
Jury selection begins Friday in the murder trial of Joseph Lamont Walker, a New Jersey police officer accused of the fatal shooting of a Lansdowne man during a road rage incident in Anne Arundel County last summer. The case will go on as scheduled after Judge Michael Wachs dismissed a motion Thursday by Walker's attorneys to have the case dismissed. One hundred and fifty potential jurors have been called to the Anne Arundel Circuit Court in Annapolis for the case, which has drawn attention in law enforcement circles.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2012
Elaine Pollack says she can sympathize with jurors in the George Huguely V murder trial — she and the 11 others who deliberated the fate of Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon in 2009 also labored under the glare of intense media attention. In the Dixon case, jurors weighed criminal charges against a sitting mayor and complicated testimony during deliberations fractured by a four-day break for Thanksgiving. Instructed not to talk to others about the case, Pollack didn't inform her mother about the jury she was sitting on. Still, Pollack said being a juror in the Huguely case must be far more daunting, not only because of the weighty murder charges but also because it's a small-town trial being watched by a nationwide audience.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | May 5, 2012
A Circuit Court Jury on Friday found a 34-year-old man guilty of first-degree murder for fatally shooting a man in East Baltimore in the summer of 2010, according to the city State's Attorney's Office. Antonio Moore, of the 400 block of North Robinson St., faces up to life plus 25 years in prison when he is sentenced June 20. Prosecutors said he got into an argument with Avon Beasley on June 12, 2010, in the 200 block of North Rose St. The suspect left but returned 20 minutes later on a bicycle, took out a .25 caliber handgun and shot Beasley in the chest.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
Dr. William Dando pleaded not guilty and is requesting a jury trial on charges he sexually assaulted a female patient at an urgent care center near Cumberland, according to court records updated Monday. Dando appeared Tuesday in Allegany County Circuit Court and his trial is scheduled for Sept. 13. Neither he nor his attorney, R. Steven Friend of Cumberland, could be reached for comment. Dando was indicted last month on sex offense charges after a 41-year-old woman told police he inappropriately touched her during an unchaperoned pelvic examination at MedExpress Urgent Care Center in LaVale in April.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
People in Maryland are being called and told to pay a fine over the phone for missing jury duty. It's a scam. The Maryland Judiciary on Friday issued a warning about calls that have surfaced in Prince George's County, where someone claiming to work for a circuit court has called residents saying they have been charged with contempt for not reporting to jury duty. The caller refers to a judge by name and demands payment of a fine over the phone using a pre-paid credit card.
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