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Eileen Ambrose | August 21, 2013
Federal courts are warning against juror scams that claim people missed jury duty and they must pay a $400 fine or be thrown in jail. The schemes mostly have appeared in New Mexico and other western states, but scams tend to travel. Marylanders should be on the lookout. According to federal courts, callers claiming to be court employees accuse people of failing to show up for jury duty and demand payment of a fine. They ask for sensitive information, such as Social Security and credit card numbers.  The courts said they mostly communicate with people via U.S. mail, and they never ask for Social Security number or credit card numbers over the phone.
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By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
In a decision with wide-reaching implications, a federal appeals court ruled this week that potential jurors cannot be left off of juries based on their sexual orientations . Remember the antitrust case involving two purveyors of HIV/AIDS drugs that was moving through appeals courts this September? (I know the answer's no - hence the link.) The short version: GlaxoSmithKline appealed a jury's verdict because lawyers for its opponent in the case, Abbott Laboratories, removed a gay man from the jury using a no-questions-asked peremptory strike.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann | peter.hermann@baltsun.com | March 25, 2010
One by one, citizens of Baltimore who had failed to show up for jury duty stood before the judge. Some pleaded they were sick or busy, and showed letters from doctors. Most simply agreed to pick a date and sign a summons, and the judge kindly dismissed charges that could have sent some to jail for a year. Eric King brought a lawyer and requested a hearing. In the courtroom Wednesday, Robert L. Pierson of Pierson & Pierson of Towson turned to his client and asked: "Did anything happen on February 8 that caused you not to appear?"
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2013
Members of a Baltimore jury were reminded on Thursday to act civil toward each other as they continue to deliberate a murder and murder conspiracy trial that has kept them in close quarters for four days. Thursday afternoon, a jury of eight black women, two black men, a white man and a white woman walked into the Baltimore City Circuit Judge Emanuel Brown's courtroom and sat down for a lecture on decorum. The jurors had been debating the fates of three men who allegedly reacted to the killing of a family member by taking revenge on people throughout a neighborhood block.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel | June 6, 2011
Maryland will allow anonymous juries starting Sept. 1, after the Court of Appeals voted 6-1 Monday to permit them in criminal trials when a judge believes juror safety, harassment or tampering is a concern. The judges said juror anonymity should be a rare exception. The new rules call for all jurors to be referred to by number, not name. They allow a judge to determine if there is a reason in each case to protect the identity of jurors. Chief Judge Robert M. Bell, the lone dissenter, said he had a philosophical problem with it. "I just cannot get my arms around an anonymous jury, especially in a death penalty case," he said before voting.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 28, 1998
Ruthann Aron's murder-for-hire trial in Montgomery County Circuit Court was postponed yesterday when one juror called in sick and another juror and the lead defense lawyer also reported feeling ill.Judge Paul A. McGuckian, himself battling a virus, sent everyone home.During jury selection, McGuckian increased the number of alternates to six because of the trial's anticipated three-week duration and the possibility of illness. One juror was dismissed in the trial's first day for undisclosed reasons.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 4, 1997
The trial of a 17-year-old youth charged with killing a Morgan State University student ended in a mistrial yesterday when a juror suffered chest pains during deliberations in Baltimore Circuit Court.Kenneth Andrew Bond of the 4600 block of Marble Hall Road in Northeast Baltimore is charged as an adult with first-degree murder, attempted murder, attempted robbery and use of a handgun in the fatal shooting of Terrence Augusta McKoy, 19, a Morgan State freshman, and the wounding of Robert Lucas, 10, who was hit by a stray bullet.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | July 11, 1992
A jury deliberating in the murder trial of Dominic J. "Crowbar" Carozza was dismissed yesterday after a juror admitted reading a newspaper article about the longtime city crime figure.The Baltimore Circuit Court jury had found Carozza and Robert J. "Tattoo Bobby" Vizzini guilty Thursday of conspiracy to commit murder and told a judge it had not reached a verdict on charges of murder and using a handgun in a violent crime.Judge David Ross ordered the jurors to continue deliberating, but when they returned yesterday morning, a juror admitted reading a story about the case in The Sun. The article described Carozza's background and noted that he and Vizzini had previously been found guilty in the murder, only to have that conviction reversed on appeal.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | April 18, 2002
REPORT FROM Juror No. 364, Circuit Court for Baltimore City, regarding the events of April 16, 2002: 8:15 a.m. Arrive at Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. Courthouse at appointed hour and enter Room 240, Jury Waiting Room, which looks like the stage set for Last Bus Stop to Hell. Everyone sits on hardback chairs that seem to fill every inch of the room. Some jurors read newspapers. Some stare into space. Some catch quick glimpses of each other while pretending they aren't. To stare is to invade already-cramped personal space.
NEWS
By Orange County Register | April 19, 1993
The arguing got so heated on the fifth day of deliberations, the jurors in the Rodney King trial almost came to blows, according to a juror.The Fullerton, Calif., resident -- designated juror 11 during the trial -- described yesterday how the jury reached its historic verdict -- including the stressful day when one male juror's blood pressure zoomed up, forcing him to see his doctor."It was one of those days when everything just blew up," the 55-year-old man said. "We had been there for 40 days, trying to be nice to each other and that day it just broke up . . . We argued, screamed, almost took swings at each other."
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
Though a Baltimore County jury agreed that former cardiologist Mark Midei placed stents in Glenn Weinberg's heart unnecessarily, one juror said panel members did not all agree that the procedure caused the prominent businessman to miss out on a stake in Maryland's largest casino. "It was hard to prove that the main factor of him missing out on Maryland Live was the placement of the stents," said Eric D. Goodman, who was juror No. 7 during the six-week trial. Weinberg was an executive with the Cordish Cos., which took on the Anne Arundel County casino project while he was recuperating.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | August 21, 2013
Federal courts are warning against juror scams that claim people missed jury duty and they must pay a $400 fine or be thrown in jail. The schemes mostly have appeared in New Mexico and other western states, but scams tend to travel. Marylanders should be on the lookout. According to federal courts, callers claiming to be court employees accuse people of failing to show up for jury duty and demand payment of a fine. They ask for sensitive information, such as Social Security and credit card numbers.  The courts said they mostly communicate with people via U.S. mail, and they never ask for Social Security number or credit card numbers over the phone.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2013
For the first time in three trials in the 2004 slashing deaths of three children in Northwest Baltimore, jurors on Monday heard a nine-year-old statement by one of the suspects describing his nephew emerging shirtless from a rear window of the apartment in which the victims were killed. The tape-recorded statement by Policarpio Espinoza Perez, charged in the killings with his nephew, Adan Espinoza Canela, was played in Baltimore Circuit Court for the first time since the May 2004 killings of three young relatives because he is now being tried separately.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2013
Lawyers on both sides of the Phylicia Barnes murder trial acknowledged the circumstantial evidence against Michael Maurice Johnson in closing arguments Monday. But while defense attorneys described flaws and inconsistencies, prosecutors said the facts point to Johnson as the only reasonable suspect. "It's not one thing," Assistant State's Attorney Lisa Goldberg told jurors. "It's everything. " Jurors began deliberating on those details in the 10th day of the trial, despite a second attempt from defense attorneys to get an early acquittal.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2012
The state's highest court has overturned the second-degree murder conviction of Thomas B. Harris, convicted of fatally stabbing Karim Cross in a Randallstown bar in 2006, and ordered a new trial. The Court of Appeals agreed with a decision by the lower appeals court. Harris was convicted and sentenced to 15 years in prison. Baltimore County State's Attorney Scott Shellenberger said prosecutors would make a decision on "whether we can go forward" with retrying Harris, as they would have to find witnesses from six years ago. The court agreed with the lower appeals court ruling that the trial judge should have declared a mistrial.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2012
Political consultant Julius Henson took the witness stand Friday to defend himself against charges he tried to suppress the black vote on Election Day 2010, saying his job in former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s campaign was to encourage minorities to vote for the Republican. Henson said he had proposed working as a general consultant with a "bold" broad-based plan to help Ehrlich return to the governor's mansion. Instead, Henson said, his designated role was "outreach" to black communities.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 15, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- Tension among jurors in the Reginald O. Denny beating trial was revealed in sharper detail yesterday as Superior Court Judge John W. Ouderkirk unsealed transcripts of closed hearings in which several jurors complained about the "twilight-zone" mental state of a juror dismissed earlier this week and explained another juror's anger at being sequestered.Judge Ouderkirk refused to dismiss that panelist for alleged misconduct, and deliberations continued as attorneys and the the news media pored over the transcripts for clues to the jury's status and state of mind.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Sun Staff Writer | April 22, 1994
The verdict was in on Anthony Sylvester Fair: Guilty on two counts of murder. Then the clerk polled the jury, and the East Baltimore teen-ager wasn't so guilty -- at least for a while.The unusual turn of events yesterday in Baltimore Circuit Court began after the first nine jurors who were polled said that they agreed with the guilty verdict. Fair's mother sobbed.The clerk then turned to Juror No. 10 and asked the usually perfunctory question: "You have heard the verdict of your forelady -- is your verdict the same as hers?"
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
Six weeks after Scott M. Greenberg was found shot to death in his parents' house in Owings Mills in August, 2009, police arrested Gerald E. Sears and charged him with murder, robbery and drug-dealing. Police never found the murder weapon, or the wallet, bank card and cell phone they claim Sears took from Greenberg. Nor did they find Sears' fingerprints or DNA in the house. What they did get were cell phone records, Sears' admission that he'd been in the house to sell crack cocaine, and no sign the house on Velvet Valley Way had been ransacked by a burglar.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2012
Avi and Eliyahu Werdesheim, Jewish brothers accused of beating a black teen while guarding their Park Heights neighborhood, withdrew a request to change the court venue Tuesday and elected to move forward with a Baltimore trial by judge, waiving their right to be heard by a jury of their peers. They had previously complained that media coverage of their case, coupled with comparisons to the Florida shooting of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin, who was gunned down by a zealous neighborhood watch captain, made it impossible to impanel a fair jury in the city.
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