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BUSINESS
October 7, 2000
PermitsNOW, an Internet-based permit processing company, announced yesterday that it was expanding its service to 17 more jurisdictions in Maryland, Virginia and Washington. The Rockville-based company, launched in August, helps businesses handle various government permitting tasks online. They can make payments, send drawings, and submit and gain access to various construction-related applications unique to the governments. Twenty-three jurisdictions are hooked up to PermitsNOW.com.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
Four investigators from agencies outside Baltimore are working to determine who left a dead rat on the car windshield of an officer who was cooperating with prosecutors on a police brutality case. "We're going to go wherever that information takes us," Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts told a City Council committee last week. But an attorney for the whistle-blower officer, Detective Joseph Crystal, believes the efforts are "way too little, way too late" and said the investigation has taken so long that any officers implicated could not be disciplined because the statute of limitations has run out. In a rare move, the investigators working the case were pulled from outside of the city, according to Crystal's attorney, Nick Panteleakis.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | September 14, 1998
Republicans may be flexing their electoral muscles statewide, but some major jurisdictions can't find enough to staff polling places for Tuesday's primary elections."
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Anthony G. Brown claimed victories in 20 of Maryland's 24 jurisdictions in the Democratic primary, but rivals Douglas F. Gansler and Heather R. Mizeur can each point to some small consolations. Gansler outpaced Brown in Carroll, Cecil and Queen Anne's counties. Mizeur, who lost badly in her Montgomery County home, scored her sole victory in Kent County, where she and her wife own a farm they use as a second home. Brown claimed 51 percent of the statewide vote, compared with 24 percent for Gansler and 22 percent for Mizeur.
NEWS
By NICK SHIELDS and NICK SHIELDS,SUN REPORTER | January 20, 2006
When a fuel tanker exploded two years ago on Interstate 95 near the border of Baltimore and Howard counties, emergency crews from various jurisdictions not only battled deadly flames. They also faced challenges in communicating with one another. "The fire service lines melt away, but we've got to be able to talk," Richard Petry, a fire director who oversees emergency communications for the Baltimore County Fire Department, said yesterday as officials unveiled radios that they said would go a long way toward solving the problem.
NEWS
April 20, 2005
THE ISSUE: After state education officials declared contract negotiations at an impasse, the Teachers Association of Anne Arundel County, which represents teachers and other school-based employees, voted last week to "work to rule" - performing all duties required by their contract during the regular workday but no longer volunteering time for tutoring or extracurricular activities for which they are not paid. Union officials requested the impasse designation because they say proposed cost-of-living increases fall far below what neighboring jurisdictions are offering.
NEWS
April 7, 1991
The General Assembly tossed a life preserver to local governments last week by suspending the state mandate requiring them to boost school funding in line with rising enrollments. This action, intended to give local jurisdictions maneuvering room at a time when many are facing burdensome shortfalls, sharpens the debate over school-board priorities.In most counties, the practical effect will be to tighten the screws on already sparse education budgets, forcing school boards to re-visit the question of negotiated salary increases for teachers.
NEWS
February 11, 1996
This schedule will be in effect in the Baltimore area tomorrow, Lincoln's Birthday:* Baltimore City: City government offices will be closed, no trash pickup, but public schools will be open.* Elsewhere: County government offices will be open, and other services will be provided in these Central Maryland jurisdictions -- Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Howard, Carroll, Harford and Frederick counties.* Courts: open.* Mail: to be delivered.
NEWS
By James Drew and James Drew,Sun Reporter | October 17, 2007
A Baltimore City lawmaker says he will introduce legislation to give the city and other relatively poor jurisdictions a greater share of state grant dollars. Del. Keith E. Haynes, a Democrat, says he wants to change the formula of a program designed to account for differences in the ability of governments to raise revenue from local income taxes. His bill would increase the total that Baltimore City receives under the disparity grant program from $78 million to $107 million, he said. Haynes, a member of the House Appropriations Committee, said the special session set to start Oct. 29 is an "opportunity to strategically leverage this unique opportunity to fight for Baltimore."
NEWS
By JUSTIN FENTON | April 23, 2006
The Harford County Sheriff's Office has announced a regional agreement with the county's three municipalities that will enable officers to respond to emergency situations outside of their jurisdictions. The impact is expected to be felt most in traffic enforcement, officials said. Previously, an officer who observed a violation - such as drunken driving - while outside of his or her jurisdiction was required to alert the local authorities. Each agency will be required to establish a set of policies to govern their officers outside of their respective jurisdictions.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2014
Custodians at the Church of the Redeemer have struggled this winter to keep its sidewalks clear of snow, but the one flush against North Charles Street in Homeland - buried by nearly every plow that passes - proved too much. The city issued the church a citation for failing to clear the walk. "One of our custodians has been here 30 years, and he doesn't ever recall having that happen before," said Ellen Chatard, program director at the church. It has been a snowy winter with 26.5 inches through Tuesday - nearly 10 inches more than average - and another 1 to 3 inches forecast for Wednesday morning.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
Many jurisdictions across the Baltimore region have exhausted their snow removal budgets for the fiscal year, even as the metro braces for yet another storm. Thursday's snow storm dumped more than two feet of snow in parts of the region, and the National Weather Service is forecasting additional accumulations of up to several inches by midday Saturday. While local governments are still tabulating costs of the most recent snowfall, many are turning to reserve funds to cover the impact.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
State lawmakers from Baltimore County hope to increase the availability of growlers, the refillable jugs that have become popular among craft beer enthusiasts. Sales of growlers have expanded elsewhere in Maryland in recent years, and county lawmakers say they want to keep up with the trend. Legislators have proposed a bill that would create growler permits for county businesses so people could take home beer from the tap. The legislation would allow liquor stores, restaurants and bars to apply for the permits.
NEWS
December 4, 2013
Few enactments emanating from Maryland's General Assembly have gained as much intense and prolonged debate as the unfunded mandate placed upon Maryland's 10 largest jurisdictions to carry out stormwater management projects.  Popularly known as the "rain tax," the legislation sought to compel the state's largest jurisdictions to implement new fees to pay for these projects. The controversy over the rain tax has continued unabated as each of the affected jurisdictions determines how to deal with this state mandate.
NEWS
By Barbara Samuels | October 15, 2013
Just before the government shut down, the Census Bureau released updated income and poverty data that highlight the impact of the Great Recession and nascent recovery. Not surprisingly, poverty has increased across the board, in both cities and suburbs, as a result of the recession. But one finding has been held out as a surprise: Brookings Institution researcher Elizabeth Kneebone's point that poverty is increasing faster in the nation's suburbs than in its cities. While true, her finding must be read in context, especially here in Baltimore, where our suburbs have fared much better than the national trend and our city has been hit harder than other cities.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
Last winter when Milford Mill football coach Reggie White started thinking about teams he might schedule for the 2013 season opener, he first considered such powerhouses as Class 4A state champion Henry A. Wise or Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association A Conference runner-up Calvert Hall. Even though the No. 9 Millers went 11-2 and reached the Class 3A state semifinals last fall, White figured that might be a little ambitious. Then, he thought about teams at the other end of the spectrum but didn't want a pushover.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Staff Writer | July 29, 1992
An estimated 8,000 Maryland school bus drivers face mandatory drug testing starting next July, under a regulation approved yesterday by the state Board of Education.But the plan faces a likely lawsuit from the public employees union that represents bus drivers in several Baltimore-area jurisdictions and throughout the state.Drivers currently are covered by a patchwork of regulations, depending on whether they work for local governments or private fleets, and whether they drive across state lines.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | April 5, 1991
The city Senate delegation is backing a bill that some of its members think could change the way Maryland tax dollars are apportioned, and help poorer jurisdictions such as Baltimore.The bill technically would appropriate $11.4 million that already was in the budget passed this week for local jurisdictions, including $9.8 million for Baltimore.The language in the bill would establish a formula that takes into account population and the amount of tax revenue raised by the local jurisdiction.
HEALTH
By Carrie Wells and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2013
Heroin overdose deaths soared last year in Baltimore, a city that has struggled with one of the highest rates of heroin addiction in the nation and with the violence that comes with illegal drug dealing. In 2012, 126 people died in the city from heroin overdoses, a jump of 66 percent from the previous year, when 76 died, reversing recent declines, according to a Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene report released Wednesday. The new data could confirm the recent warnings from state health officials that a crackdown on illicit prescription opiates was pushing more addicts toward the street drug.
NEWS
By Alison Prost | April 30, 2013
Stormwater is the only source of pollution to local waterways that is growing. There has been much talk lately of stormwater fees as a "rain tax. " While catchy, the moniker really doesn't tell the story. The story begins when those raindrops hit parking lots, roads and other paved surfaces. As they flow downhill, they pick up pollution - oil and grease from automobiles, fertilizer from our yards, and dog waste that wasn't picked up. That pollution flows into storm drains, then into local streams and creeks, then into local rivers.
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