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By Frank Luksa and Frank Luksa,Dallas Morning News | December 10, 1992
DALLAS -- Still the best pure passer I ever saw, Sonn Jurgensen never lost his touch. The only difference today is he throws tight verbal spirals.Jurgensen is an especially keen observer of the quarterback position he played to Hall of Fame distinction. He was known then as the Red Baron. He shot passes from the hip with a quick-draw motion.Sonny is known now for sharp, often barbed commentary over the Washington Redskins radio broadcasts. He shoots from the lip there, and just as pointedly over the telephone.
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By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | February 6, 2009
The Eagle Has Landed is dreamy, elliptical and oddly engaging. It captures the audience quickly and does not easily surrender its grasp. Like a poem, it uses an economical vocabulary to tell its story. Every movement, tone and syllable is packed with meaning. Because it is so condensed and distilled, this kind of play is a kind of high-wire act for the actors, and requires performers as skilled as the three members of the Liverpool-based Fool's Proof Theatre to pull it off. Falter, and the audience will feel confused instead of enlightened, annoyed instead of refreshed.
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FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2004
The top editor of USA Today announced her early and immediate retirement yesterday, days before the expected public release of a critical report detailing how the paper's former foreign correspondent Jack Kelley was able to deceive editors and readers in print for years. In an e-mail to USA Today's staffers, Editor Karen Jurgensen, 55, said she regretted not identifying problems with Kelley's reporting earlier. "Like all of us who worked with Jack Kelley, I wish we had caught him far sooner than we did," Jurgensen wrote.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2004
ASHBURN, Va. - The reverence of NFL fans is such that their favorite players often get to be known by their first names. On the Washington Redskins, there was "Sonny" (Jurgensen), "Billy" (Kilmer) and "Coach Joe" (Gibbs). So it was with the team's radio broadcasters: Sonny, Sam and Frank. Head coaches came and went - six in the past dozen years alone - but the broadcast trio was, for many fans, a comforting mainstay of their game day routines. At least until this season. WJFK-FM announced in February that it was replacing play-by-play man Frank Herzog, breaking up the team of Herzog, Jurgensen and Sam Huff that has called Redskins games since 1981.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2004
The top editor of USA Today said yesterday that the national newspaper will investigate any new, specific challenges to the reporting of disgraced former correspondent Jack Kelley. Its own inquiry into the veracity of several of his articles was shut down when Kelley was forced to resign last week after having acknowledged deceiving editors. "We'll look into any specific allegations that arise," USA Today Editor Karen Jurgensen said yesterday in an interview. "We have to let the situation play out. This was a very painful situation for our staff."
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2004
ASHBURN, Va. - The reverence of NFL fans is such that their favorite players often get to be known by their first names. On the Washington Redskins, there was "Sonny" (Jurgensen), "Billy" (Kilmer) and "Coach Joe" (Gibbs). So it was with the team's radio broadcasters: Sonny, Sam and Frank. Head coaches came and went - six in the past dozen years alone - but the broadcast trio was, for many fans, a comforting mainstay of their game day routines. At least until this season. WJFK-FM announced in February that it was replacing play-by-play man Frank Herzog, breaking up the team of Herzog, Jurgensen and Sam Huff that has called Redskins games since 1981.
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,SUN STAFF | September 14, 1997
There is no quarterback controversy in Washington.Not yet, anyway.Everybody connected with the Washington Redskins has spent the past six days calling Gus Frerotte's three interceptions in a 14-13 loss to the Pittsburgh Steelers last Sunday a major aberration.They fully expect him to bounce back today with the type of steely-nerved, razor-sharp performance that was common almost every Sunday last season, when Washington started 7-1 before fading to 9-7 behind a defense that virtually collapsed.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | December 7, 1997
Cigars are usually handed out in celebration. New babies, a promotion. When Sonny Jurgensen went searching for Jeff Hostetler at Redskin Park on Monday, he didn't know the handful of cigars he was delivering to the backup quarterback would be viewed a few hours later as a celebratory gesture.But once Jurgensen found out that Hostetler would be finishing the season as Washington's starter in place of Gus Frerotte, who fractured his hip against the St. Louis Rams last week, the old quarterback grinned as if something good might be about to happen.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Sun Staff Writer | August 4, 1994
CARLISLE, Pa. -- Former quarterback turned TV personality Sonny Jurgensen, who made a grand total of $988,000 during an 18-year Hall of Fame career, asked the first question of the Washington Redskins' $19 million man yesterday."
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | August 11, 1999
FROSTBURG -- "I used to say it was pretty difficult to get fired around here," an ex-employee of the Washington Redskins said with a rueful grin recently.It's gotten a lot easier for Redskins employees to get fired since communications executive Daniel Snyder bought the team recently for $800 million.Snyder has swept through the Redskins' offices like a hurricane, firing about 25 employees from the general manager to the stadium director to the public relations director.You need a roster to keep up with who's who in the Redskins' front office.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2004
Kenneth A. Paulson, a former newspaper editor, lawyer and free speech advocate, has been picked to lead USA Today in the wake of the worst scandal in the newspaper's nearly 22-year-history. In an interview, USA Today publisher and President Craig Moon said Paulson's appointment as editor would help the newspaper "continue to build the brand online and in print," and that he would mend the newsroom culture to ensure the "accountability" of the newspaper's reporting. Major changes were not needed, Moon said.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2004
The top editor of USA Today announced her early and immediate retirement yesterday, days before the expected public release of a critical report detailing how the paper's former foreign correspondent Jack Kelley was able to deceive editors and readers in print for years. In an e-mail to USA Today's staffers, Editor Karen Jurgensen, 55, said she regretted not identifying problems with Kelley's reporting earlier. "Like all of us who worked with Jack Kelley, I wish we had caught him far sooner than we did," Jurgensen wrote.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2004
The top editor of USA Today said yesterday that the national newspaper will investigate any new, specific challenges to the reporting of disgraced former correspondent Jack Kelley. Its own inquiry into the veracity of several of his articles was shut down when Kelley was forced to resign last week after having acknowledged deceiving editors. "We'll look into any specific allegations that arise," USA Today Editor Karen Jurgensen said yesterday in an interview. "We have to let the situation play out. This was a very painful situation for our staff."
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | August 11, 1999
FROSTBURG -- "I used to say it was pretty difficult to get fired around here," an ex-employee of the Washington Redskins said with a rueful grin recently.It's gotten a lot easier for Redskins employees to get fired since communications executive Daniel Snyder bought the team recently for $800 million.Snyder has swept through the Redskins' offices like a hurricane, firing about 25 employees from the general manager to the stadium director to the public relations director.You need a roster to keep up with who's who in the Redskins' front office.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | December 7, 1997
Cigars are usually handed out in celebration. New babies, a promotion. When Sonny Jurgensen went searching for Jeff Hostetler at Redskin Park on Monday, he didn't know the handful of cigars he was delivering to the backup quarterback would be viewed a few hours later as a celebratory gesture.But once Jurgensen found out that Hostetler would be finishing the season as Washington's starter in place of Gus Frerotte, who fractured his hip against the St. Louis Rams last week, the old quarterback grinned as if something good might be about to happen.
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,SUN STAFF | September 14, 1997
There is no quarterback controversy in Washington.Not yet, anyway.Everybody connected with the Washington Redskins has spent the past six days calling Gus Frerotte's three interceptions in a 14-13 loss to the Pittsburgh Steelers last Sunday a major aberration.They fully expect him to bounce back today with the type of steely-nerved, razor-sharp performance that was common almost every Sunday last season, when Washington started 7-1 before fading to 9-7 behind a defense that virtually collapsed.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | February 6, 2009
The Eagle Has Landed is dreamy, elliptical and oddly engaging. It captures the audience quickly and does not easily surrender its grasp. Like a poem, it uses an economical vocabulary to tell its story. Every movement, tone and syllable is packed with meaning. Because it is so condensed and distilled, this kind of play is a kind of high-wire act for the actors, and requires performers as skilled as the three members of the Liverpool-based Fool's Proof Theatre to pull it off. Falter, and the audience will feel confused instead of enlightened, annoyed instead of refreshed.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2004
Kenneth A. Paulson, a former newspaper editor, lawyer and free speech advocate, has been picked to lead USA Today in the wake of the worst scandal in the newspaper's nearly 22-year-history. In an interview, USA Today publisher and President Craig Moon said Paulson's appointment as editor would help the newspaper "continue to build the brand online and in print," and that he would mend the newsroom culture to ensure the "accountability" of the newspaper's reporting. Major changes were not needed, Moon said.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Sun Staff Writer | August 4, 1994
CARLISLE, Pa. -- Former quarterback turned TV personality Sonny Jurgensen, who made a grand total of $988,000 during an 18-year Hall of Fame career, asked the first question of the Washington Redskins' $19 million man yesterday."
SPORTS
By Frank Luksa and Frank Luksa,Dallas Morning News | December 10, 1992
DALLAS -- Still the best pure passer I ever saw, Sonn Jurgensen never lost his touch. The only difference today is he throws tight verbal spirals.Jurgensen is an especially keen observer of the quarterback position he played to Hall of Fame distinction. He was known then as the Red Baron. He shot passes from the hip with a quick-draw motion.Sonny is known now for sharp, often barbed commentary over the Washington Redskins radio broadcasts. He shoots from the lip there, and just as pointedly over the telephone.
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