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By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | August 20, 1993
Of course you bought one of the 9 million copies of "Jurassic Park" in print, and certainly you've seen the movie. But if you've still got brontosauruses on the brain, take note:The illustrated gift edition of "Jurassic Park" is out. All yours, for $35.Today, publisher Alfred A. Knopf is releasing 15,000 copies of a special-edition hard-cover printing of Michael Crichton's best-selling novel, which was originally published in hardback in November 1990.The...
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | July 31, 2012
“Jurassic Park Builder” Ludia Available on iOS devices Score: 4 out of 4 “Jurassic Park,” a film now 20 years gone by, is well-trodden territory for video game adaptations. The original concept, brilliantly adapted from Michael Crichton's novel, has become so familiar that it almost feels like someone should've created a real-life dinosaur park by now. In that timespan, nobody has successfully extracted dinosaur DNA from fossilized amber, but several attempts have been made to simulate the experience, the best of which is “Jurassic Park Builder” for iOS . The genre of park-building “Tycoon”-style games rarely needs another entry.
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | November 9, 1993
Tonight's TV is surprisingly and refreshingly busy, so let's get right to it.* "Victim of Love: The Shannon Mohr Story" (8-10 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- As a television docudrama inspired by stories previously presented on "reality shows," this "Unsolved Mysteries Movie" is much better than the Charles Stuart case from "Rescue 911," though not nearly so potent as the John List case from "America's Most Wanted." NBC.* "Nova: 'The Real Jurassic Park' " (9-10 p.m., WMPT, Channels 22 and 67, WETA, Channel 26)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sara Toth | September 26, 2011
Subtlety isn't a strength of the new FOX show “Terra Nova.” With all the mystery and none of the finesse of “Lost,” and all the dinosaurs and none of the excitement of “Jurassic Park,” the show has all the makings of a glorious, wonderful disaster. The premise is simple - and ominous - enough. In the year 2149, the planet Earth has become a nearly uninhabitable dystopia of rancid air and Orwellian undertones, so the government has begun sending people back in time - 85 million years back in time, to be precise, to start a new life in fortressed cabanas in the midst of a dinosaur-inhabited jungle.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | June 10, 1993
Washington -- At the Cato Institute, a libertarian think tan here, a recent lecturer drolly introduced himself in language fashionable in Bill Clinton's Washington: ''I am an excess of the 1980s.''He is T.J. Rodgers, president and CEO of Cypress Semiconductor, which he founded 10 years ago with one used computer and no other employee. He is one of those who, in Mr. Clinton's words, ''profited most from the uneven prosperity of the last decade.'' (A question: What would ''even'' prosperity look like?
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | June 14, 1993
Steven Spielberg went to the movies Friday night to see his new horror movie "Jurassic Park." So did an estimated 9.6 million people who paid a record-devouring $48.5 million over the weekend to view the heavily promoted feature film that has dTC unleashed a wave of dinosaur-mania across the United States.The box-office gross is projected to be the highest for any movie in film history for a non-holiday weekend.Saturday's $18 million alone was the biggest a movie has ever grossed on a single day.Mr.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Daily News | May 24, 1993
Attention mothers, fathers, grandmothers, grandfathers, aunts, uncles and anyone associated with children. All your cash soon may be extinct.The June release of "Jurassic Park," the Steven Spielberg movie about genetically cloned dinosaurs gone wild at a Central American theme park, has spawned a plethora of goods that you can eat, wear and play with.And they are coming to a store shelf near you. Call it Tie-ins R Us.More than 100 companies have signed up with MCA Inc. to produce more than 1,000 products worldwide.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | June 21, 1993
Forget the dinosaurs. The real stars of "Jurassic Park" are the computers -- on screen and behind the camera -- that created the look and feel of this year's biggest blockbuster movie.On screen* APPLE: The control room for Jurassic Park, where the main characters seek refuge from rampaging reptiles, is packed with Quadra computers from Apple Computer Inc. of Cupertino, Calif. Look for a PowerBook in the Montana trailer-office where dinosaur scientists Sam Neill and Laura Dern first meet Jurassic Park owner Richard Attenborough.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | June 10, 1993
When Steven Spielberg mutters, "Leapin' Lizards!" he isn' kidding around.Thus his much anticipated version of Michael Crichton's"Jurassic Park" is a festival of leaping lizards -- and cavorting, cartwheeling, gamboling, strutting, bounding and tumbling lizards, which gets exactly at the movie's signal triumph and its primary drawing card: You will believe that they are back. And that they brought their teeth.Will you believe anything else?That's a more difficult question to answer. The set-up is just chilling enough, a variation on a theme Michael Crichton worked earlier in his film "Westworld," about a high-tech amusement park that turned lethal for its customers.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | June 12, 1993
With two gold rings in his left ear, a baseball cap jammed backward on his head and a dog-eared copy of "Jurassic Park" in his hand, Ian Patterson, 17, bypassed school and went to Towson Commons yesterday morning to watch the movie he has waited weeks to see."I was a dinosaur fan when I was small, then I kind of forgot about them," he said. "But when I read the book a month ago, I got back into it." The spine on his paperback is deeply creased. He's scoured the press for stories about cloning dinosaurs from their DNA, like in the movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Geoff Boucher and Tribune Newspapers | February 11, 2010
Forget silver bullets, blooming wolf's bane and full-moon fever - the real curse of "The Wolfman" was all the hard luck that the Universal Pictures release had to claw through to reach the screen Friday. The old-school monster revival, which stars Benicio Del Toro and Anthony Hopkins, arrives after enduring a late change in director, three release-date postponements and a major re-editing. The strange thing, though, at least according to director Joe Johnston, is that somehow the film underwent a startling metamorphosis in the final cut. "I think it's turned into a film that is much, much better than the studio or probably anyone else expected," the filmmaker said while sitting down for lunch at a Beverly Hills hotel.
NEWS
By Dennis McLellan and Dennis McLellan,Los Angeles Times | November 6, 2008
LOS ANGELES - Michael Crichton, the doctor-turned-author of best-selling thrillers such as The Terminal Man and Jurassic Park and a Hollywood writer and director whose credits include Westworld and Coma, has died. He was 66. Dr. Crichton died in Los Angeles on Tuesday "after a courageous and private battle against cancer," his family said in a statement. For nearly four decades, the 6-foot-9 writer was a towering presence in the worlds of publishing and filmmaking. "There was no one like Crichton, because he could both entertain and educate," Lynn Nesbit, Dr. Crichton's agent since the late 1960s, told the Los Angeles Times yesterday.
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By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | February 28, 2008
Robby Rackleff wriggles and writhes his way into a homemade fat suit. If you go They Should All Be Destroyed (A Jurassic Park Play) will be performed at the H&H Building, 405 W. Franklin St., sixth floor, tomorrow and Saturday. Doors open at 8 p.m. A $5 donation is suggested. Information: whamcity.com.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | October 14, 2007
Wait a minute. Wait a minute. You ain't heard nothin' yet." Before it was a cliche, it was a prophecy: Eighty years ago this month, audiences watched - and listened - as a character in a major motion picture spoke to them for the first time. The actor was Al Jolson, and the movie was The Jazz Singer. The effect was revolutionary. Within two years, talking pictures were everywhere, no one was releasing silent films, and three decades of silent-filmmaking was obsolete - tossed on the scrap heap.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 4, 2006
Albert and David Maysles' Run- ning Fence, a documentary on artist Cristo's four-year project to run a fabric fence across 24 miles of California farmland, will be shown outdoors tonight at the Evergreen House, 4545 N. Charles St. Also showing will be Charles and Ray Eames' Powers of Ten, a close-up look at two picnickers in a park. Gates open at 7 p.m., with the movies starting at 9 p.m. Tickets are $8 for adults, $5 for children 11 and younger. Infants get in for free. Food will be sold by the Creative Alliance, co-sponsors of the event.
FEATURES
February 2, 2006
Critic's Pick-- Cloned dinosaurs become neat zoo attractions. Then they get loose in Jurassic Park (9 p.m.- midnight, USA). Laura Dern (above) stars.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | March 22, 1994
Steven Spielberg finally won his Oscar last night at the 66th Annual Academy Awards, winning Best Director and Picture for "Schindler's List.""This is the first time I ever held one in my hands," said the director of the Holocaust drama that re-creates one of the darkest events in human history and yet chooses to emphasize heroism and nobility rather than evil."
FEATURES
By Steven Rea and Steven Rea,Knight-Ridder News Service | June 6, 1993
In one corner there's a 74-foot-long brachiosaur.In the other, a 75-foot-tall Schwarzenegger.It's the battle of the bigfoots, and it's coming to a multiplex near you.With Steven Spielberg's "Jurassic Park," the DNA-clone dino-fantasy adapted from Michael Crichton's best seller, and Arnold Schwarzenegger's "Last Action Hero," a slam-bang fantasy about a teen-ager who steps into a movie starring a pumped-up juggernaut (in one sequence, a giant inflatable Schwarzenegger...
TRAVEL
By PAUL BUTLER | January 1, 2006
More green and majestic than Jurassic Park, Dominica was the recent film location of Pirates of the Caribbean's sequel, Dead Man's Chest. More importantly - to my wife and me - it was the scene of our 25th wedding anniversary. It's said to be the only Caribbean island Columbus would still recognize: virtually unspoiled with no all-inclusive resorts cluttering the coastline. That means no walls to keep the real Dominica and its people hidden. Almost anyone will be happy to give you directions to a secluded beach or waterfall, reminding you to "keep drivin' on de left," British style.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff | June 3, 2005
They draw fantastic creatures that no one has ever seen, based on scraps of ancient bone and scanty threads of information. And their critics? Merciless experts they don't even know. Yes, illustrating dinosaurs and other prehistoric life can be a challenging job for an artist. "Most of the public is looking at the pictures. That's why their work is so important," said James Kirkland, a Utah State paleontologist and member of a team that recently discovered a new dinosaur species. Paleontologists like Kirkland spend years digging in sun-baked wastelands, pawing through fossil remains in search of prehistoric life.
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