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By Scott Dance | March 9, 2012
Sky-watchers got a beautiful show last month, with the crescent moon, Venus and Jupiter decorating the western horizon at nightfall. There is more ahead. Venus and Jupiter continue to grow closer to each other and more spectacular on the horizon. Look to the west after sunset tonight; by late next week, the planets will be 3 degrees apart, according to EarthSky.org. The waxing crescent moon will return to join them by the end of the month. Read more about the opportunities for stargazing this month in this post at EarthSky .
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2014
The two brightest planets in the sky, Venus and Jupiter, will appear side by side in the early-morning sky Monday. At only a quarter of a degree apart, it's the closest two planets will appear in our sky this year, according to EarthSky.org. Look low in the eastern sky about 5 a.m., an hour before dawn, and see them into the morning twilight. Though they look close, they are hundreds of millions of miles apart.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2012
Earth passed between the sun and Jupiter on Sunday night, making the gaseous giant appear its largest and brightest in just over a year. Three other planets are meanwhile lining up for a show in the early mornings. Jupiter reached what is known as opposition, when it is opposite the sun in our sky.  That is making it near its maximum brightness, much brighter than most stars and about as bright as the International Space Station on a good flyover, according to AstronomyNow.com . Not only that, but Jupiter is visible well above the horizon for about 11 hours each night, and several of its moons are visible with binoculars as well, according to the website.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | October 17, 2013
The members of the Jupiter String Quartet surely will be in harmonious alignment with each other when this chamber ensemble performs for Candlelight Concert Society on Saturday, Oct. 19, at 8 p.m., in Howard Community College's Smith Theatre. After playing together for more than a decade, one can expect that sort of professional connection between violinists Nelson Lee and Megan Freivogel, violist Liz Freivogel and cellist Daniel McDonough. There also are strong personal connections between them.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2013
Venus, Jupiter and Mercury are all visible in the night sky around the end of this month, and they are moving toward their closest conjunction for nearly a decade. The three planets fit within a 5-degree sliver of the sky starting Friday and through Wednesday. They won't be bunched as closely together as they will on Sunday night until 2021, according to EarthSky.org. Look to the north-northwest horizon about 40 minutes after sunset, EarthSky suggests. Around this time of year, that means a little after 9 p.m. in Baltimore, with sunset getting close to 8:30 p.m. Wondering which planet is which when you look?
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 19, 1994
Most of the world's telescopes on the ground and in space will be pointed at Jupiter this summer, watching for a cosmic collision that is certain to happen and waiting to give scientists their first view of the kind of catastrophic event that may have accounted for mass extinctions on Earth long ago and the eventual emergence of humans.A comet, now shattered into at least 21 icy chunks, is zeroing in on the largest planet in the solar system.Scientists have been tracking the course of the comet, Shoemaker-Levy, for more than a year.
EXPLORE
August 13, 2012
In Monday pool play action at the Cal Ripken World Series in Aberdeen, the Ohio Valley squad from Mattoon, Ill., topped the Harford County team from Forest Hill, while the Southeast team from Jupiter, Fla., picked up its second victory by defeating the Midwest Plains representative from Lamar, Colo. Playing at Fenway Park Monday afternoon, Mattoon dropped the host Forest Hill team, 9-4. Mattoon improved to 1-2, while Forest Hill fell to 0-3. Davis Johnson was Mattoon's top offensive contributor, going 2-for-3 with a double, two RBIs and two runs.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Staff Writer | July 23, 1994
They came, they squinted, they saw. Night after starry night this week, earthlings entered the bunker of telescopes at the University of Maryland's observatory and gawked at the effects of the comet-bashing of Jupiter.The observatory, usually a quiet outpost stashed off Metzerott Road in College Park, was downright popular this week. Hundreds of people filled its Open House to hear textbook lectures and stand in line at the $50,000, 20-inch telescope aimed at that news-making white dot to the southwest.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | July 17, 1994
Astronomers reacted with whoops and slurps of champagne last night as photographs of the impact of the first fragment of comet P/Shoemaker-Levy 9 with Jupiter showed that it left a bright splotch on the planet's surface.Based on the photo, scientists estimated the size of the first fragment -- among the broken comet's smallest -- at about one kilometer, or 0.6-mile.That's bigger than many predictions, and suggested that the much bigger chunks of rock and ice due to hit the planet thisweek will produce a dramatic display for scientists around the world.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance | October 6, 2006
Using the Hubble Space Telescope to peer straight into the hub of the Milky Way galaxy, astronomers at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore have found evidence of 16 more Jupiter-sized planets, each circling its own sun. These new planet candidates are the most distant - some 26,000 light years from Earth - of the more than 200 "extrasolar" planets detected so far. Their abundance, the astronomers say, suggests our galaxy alone may hold...
EXPLORE
September 26, 2013
Laura and Drew Walston, of Laurel, announce the birth of their son, Roman Jacob Walston, Sept. 13, 2013, at 7:29 p.m., weighing 8 pounds, 1 ounce. His maternal grandparents are Scott and Robin Baron, of Baltimore. His paternal grandfather is Wallace Carlton Walston, of Jupiter, Fla.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2013
Venus, Jupiter and Mercury are all visible in the night sky around the end of this month, and they are moving toward their closest conjunction for nearly a decade. The three planets fit within a 5-degree sliver of the sky starting Friday and through Wednesday. They won't be bunched as closely together as they will on Sunday night until 2021, according to EarthSky.org. Look to the north-northwest horizon about 40 minutes after sunset, EarthSky suggests. Around this time of year, that means a little after 9 p.m. in Baltimore, with sunset getting close to 8:30 p.m. Wondering which planet is which when you look?
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2012
Earth passed between the sun and Jupiter on Sunday night, making the gaseous giant appear its largest and brightest in just over a year. Three other planets are meanwhile lining up for a show in the early mornings. Jupiter reached what is known as opposition, when it is opposite the sun in our sky.  That is making it near its maximum brightness, much brighter than most stars and about as bright as the International Space Station on a good flyover, according to AstronomyNow.com . Not only that, but Jupiter is visible well above the horizon for about 11 hours each night, and several of its moons are visible with binoculars as well, according to the website.
EXPLORE
August 13, 2012
In Monday pool play action at the Cal Ripken World Series in Aberdeen, the Ohio Valley squad from Mattoon, Ill., topped the Harford County team from Forest Hill, while the Southeast team from Jupiter, Fla., picked up its second victory by defeating the Midwest Plains representative from Lamar, Colo. Playing at Fenway Park Monday afternoon, Mattoon dropped the host Forest Hill team, 9-4. Mattoon improved to 1-2, while Forest Hill fell to 0-3. Davis Johnson was Mattoon's top offensive contributor, going 2-for-3 with a double, two RBIs and two runs.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | March 23, 2012
It has been hard not to notice Venus and Jupiter twinkling in the western sky on all the pleasant, clear nights we've had. The view is about to get a little more spectacular. The crescent moon begins to peek out tonight, and over the next several nights will provide some drama in the sky alongside the bright planets. Look just above the western horizon at dusk to find them. Venus is the higher planet, and Jupiter the lower. If you have a decent backyard telescope, you should even be able to see Jupiter's four largest moons orbiting the gaseous giant.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | March 9, 2012
Sky-watchers got a beautiful show last month, with the crescent moon, Venus and Jupiter decorating the western horizon at nightfall. There is more ahead. Venus and Jupiter continue to grow closer to each other and more spectacular on the horizon. Look to the west after sunset tonight; by late next week, the planets will be 3 degrees apart, according to EarthSky.org. The waxing crescent moon will return to join them by the end of the month. Read more about the opportunities for stargazing this month in this post at EarthSky .
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | February 23, 1995
A Johns Hopkins University astrophysicist has discovered an oxygen atmosphere on Europa, the "ice-moon" of Jupiter. But don't pack your bags.It's 230 degrees below zero out there, 483 million miles from the sun. And the atmosphere at Europa's surface is as wispy as Earth's 150 miles above the ground, near where the space shuttle flies."
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | July 20, 1994
No news yet from Dancer or Blitzen, but Comet is becoming a big TV star this week -- or, if not a big star, at least a big celestial supporting player. Newscasts and CNN are one great place to watch for the latest images from the collisions of the comet fragments on Jupiter -- and tonight, public television provides another. The most out-of-this-world TV star tonight, though, is the Earth's moon, the focus of several TV specials on this silver anniversary of man's first moonwalk.* "Apollo 13: To the Edge and Back" (9-10:30 p.m., WMPT, channels 22 and 67)
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | January 7, 2010
On this night in 1610 in Padua, Galileo Galilei turned his small telescope toward Jupiter. He saw three "fixed stars" in a straight line - two on one side of Jupiter's disk, one on the other. The next night, all three were on the planet's right side. Galileo soon spied a fourth "star." The quartet seemed to shift positions, or duck behind the planet, nightly, always staying close. He concluded they were moons orbiting Jupiter. By March 12, he'd published his discovery, changing astronomy forever.
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