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By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 5, 1994
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- Haiti's dictatorship went into its death throes yesterday as the first member of the three-man military junta fled into voluntary exile, and the leader of the country's most brutal terror organization publicly renounced violence.Police chief Lt. Col. Michel Francois, who initiated the coup against democratically elected President Jean-Bertrand Aristide three years ago, crossed the border into the Dominican Republic, which shares the island of Hispaniola with Haiti.
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NEWS
February 23, 2012
A reporter inquires about the way we refer to U.S. Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin, because his staff says that he prefers to be known as plain old Ben Cardin. (He's running for re-election.) Can we do that? Sure. We're easy. We accommodated Jimmy Carter and Bob Dole, so Ben Cardin should be no strain.  Our practice at The Baltimore Sun  is to refer to people by the names they choose to use for public purposes. So we indulge k.d. lang and bell hooks in their typographical eccentricities* as well as just-plain-folks seekers of public office. Sometimes people change their names formally for purposes of being listed on the ballot, as did American Joe Miedusiewski, a former Maryland state senator.
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NEWS
By James Gerstenzang and James Gerstenzang,Los Angeles Times | October 20, 2007
Washington -- President Bush reached further into his administration's limited arsenal of sanctions to apply against Myanmar yesterday by targeting additional senior officials and supporters. He also called on China and India to join international efforts to promote human rights and democracy in the military-run Southeast Asian nation formerly called Burma. With his wife, Laura, who has taken a very public interest in the nation's political conditions, at his side, Bush said, "The people of Burma are showing great courage in the face of immense repression.
NEWS
By Elaine Pearson | October 2, 2009
In June, Gaithersburg resident Kyaw Zaw Lwin traveled from Thailand to New York to deliver a petition to U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon's special adviser on Burma. The petition, with 680,000 signatures, called on the secretary-general to exert pressure for the release of more than 2,000 political prisoners. Now, in a tragic twist - and as the Obama administration moves forward with a new policy of increased engagement with Burma - Mr. Zaw Lwin, a U.S. citizen who often goes by the name Nyi Nyi Aung, has disappeared into a Burmese jail cell himself.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 11, 2008
YANGON, Myanmar -- In this cyclone-ravaged country where most people have more important things on their minds, such as the daily struggle for fresh water, food and shelter, Myanmar's ruling generals sent their people to the polls yesterday to vote on a constitution that opponents call a cynical attempt to maintain the junta's grip on power. The regime insists that the vote to approve the new constitution, held in parts of the country that weren't affected by last weekend's devastating storm, is part of its road map to "discipline-flourishing genuine multiparty democracy."
NEWS
By Hector Tobar and Hector Tobar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 25, 2004
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina - Four angry generals, five miffed governors and a pair of missing oil paintings were not enough to prevent President Nestor Kirchner from commemorating the dead of Argentina's "dirty war" with two powerfully symbolic acts yesterday that hit hard at the legacy of the country's former military dictators. Kirchner dedicated the Museum of Memory at the Navy Mechanics School, former site of a clandestine concentration camp where thousands of prisoners were tortured and murdered between 1976 and 1983 under military rule.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Kathy Lally and Will Englund and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | August 21, 1991
MOSCOW -- The leaders of a 2-day-old coup against Mikhail S. Gorbachev put this city under curfew last night and sent more armor rumbling into the streets, but the protest against them did not diminish.Thousands of Muscovites were still standing their ground this morning, drawn to the city center to protest the coup that toppled President Gorbachev and urged on by Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin, the symbol of their opposition.Three protesters were killed by armored military vehicles early this morning at a highway underpass, while thousands of demonstrators spent the night nearby waiting grimly for afull-fledged armored assault that never came against Mr. Yeltsin.
NEWS
By Jorge A. Goldstein | February 3, 1997
I WAS THREE YEARS OLD when Eva Peron died, and I can't say I remember too much of the event. I have a vague memory of rain and long lines of people around the Plaza del Congreso waiting to go in and catch a glimpse of her casket. Ah, and my father muttering under his breath something like: ''. . . about time!''What I do remember is three years later, in 1955, when Juan (''El Pocho'') Peron, his regime under attack on several fronts for corruption and scandal (he was accused, among other things, of being a pedophile)
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 23, 1992
BANGKOK, Thailand -- Political parties aligned with Thailand's junta won more than half the parliamentary seats at stake yesterday in general elections, the first since the military toppled a democratically elected government in a bloodless coup 13 months ago.While the results should allow the pro-military parties to dominate the new government, their victory was slim enough that it could -- hopes within the junta that one of the leaders of the coup will...
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | January 28, 2002
TWO WORDS in the Massachusetts manslaughter trial of Thomas Junta burned my ears: "That's hockey." Heard that one before, many times. It's macho shorthand, used by hockey fans to defend fights in the National Hockey League, and by hockey dads and hockey moms to dismiss peers who express some squeamishness about rough play on the ice. Think NHL stars set a bad example by dropping the gloves and going at it? My son elbowed your son "behind the play" and got away with it? "That's hockey." In other words: "The coolest, fastest game on Earth is a contact sport and sometimes there's more contact than the rule book allows, so get used to it or have little Josh take up tennis."
NEWS
May 15, 2008
Myanmar's ruling junta has sacrificed the lives of its people to selfishly protect its secretive, repressive government. Human life means little to the generals in power, and their restrictions on food, shelter, water and other relief aid for cyclone victims is ample proof of that. Their indifference to the critical needs of survivors will consign so many more of them to death. Myanmar's rulers need only look to its neighbor to see that a military response to a natural disaster is foremost about saving lives, not safeguarding the regime.
NEWS
By Stewart Patrick | May 15, 2008
For nearly two weeks, we have witnessed the callous indifference of Myanmar's ruling junta to the victims of Cyclone Nargis. The regime's grotesque failure to permit more than a trickle of aid has stimulated calls for the United Nations to compel Myanmar to provide access for international relief efforts. Whether such calls are answered could determine the survival of hundreds of thousands in Myanmar spared from the initial inundation but clinging to life without food, clean water, shelter and access to lifesaving medicines.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 11, 2008
YANGON, Myanmar -- In this cyclone-ravaged country where most people have more important things on their minds, such as the daily struggle for fresh water, food and shelter, Myanmar's ruling generals sent their people to the polls yesterday to vote on a constitution that opponents call a cynical attempt to maintain the junta's grip on power. The regime insists that the vote to approve the new constitution, held in parts of the country that weren't affected by last weekend's devastating storm, is part of its road map to "discipline-flourishing genuine multiparty democracy."
NEWS
May 8, 2008
The longer the military government of Myanmar waits to allow relief agencies into the cyclone-ravaged country, the higher the death toll among its impoverished and homeless people will be. The weekend storm already may have killed 70,000, and international relief experts say the toll could rise to 100,000 without prompt aid. The generals running the isolated Southeast Asian country were neither prepared for Tropical Cyclone Nargis nor equipped to handle...
NEWS
By Jared Genser and Meghan Barron | October 26, 2007
This week, on the other side of the world, a 62-year-old woman marks 12 years of sitting alone in her home. The telephone is silent because the line is disconnected. The doorbell never rings because visitors are forbidden. There is no mail or news. For our client, Aung San Suu Kyi, the democratically elected leader of Myanmar and Nobel Peace laureate, little has changed for years - there is almost complete isolation. It has been more than a month since the world witnessed tens of thousands of Buddhist monks in saffron robes marching in solidarity with the Burmese people, protesting the military junta in that country.
NEWS
By James Gerstenzang and James Gerstenzang,Los Angeles Times | October 20, 2007
Washington -- President Bush reached further into his administration's limited arsenal of sanctions to apply against Myanmar yesterday by targeting additional senior officials and supporters. He also called on China and India to join international efforts to promote human rights and democracy in the military-run Southeast Asian nation formerly called Burma. With his wife, Laura, who has taken a very public interest in the nation's political conditions, at his side, Bush said, "The people of Burma are showing great courage in the face of immense repression.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 21, 1991
MOSCOW -- The leaders of the Kremlin coup, facing increased opposition, responded yesterday with a curfew and fresh armored movements in Moscow that provoked clashes with angry civilians.During the overnight violence, in which three people were killed defying the military curfew, angry civilians hurled firebombs and rocks. That occurred after a long, anxious day in which large crowds sought to protect the parliament headquarters of President Boris N. Yeltsin of the Russian Federation.As the Kremlin sought to press home freshly assumed powers, (( Mr. Yeltsin intensified his spirited holdout against the junta of military, KGB and Communist Party figures who deposed President Mikhail S. Gorbachev on Monday.
NEWS
By Jared Genser and Meghan Barron | October 26, 2007
This week, on the other side of the world, a 62-year-old woman marks 12 years of sitting alone in her home. The telephone is silent because the line is disconnected. The doorbell never rings because visitors are forbidden. There is no mail or news. For our client, Aung San Suu Kyi, the democratically elected leader of Myanmar and Nobel Peace laureate, little has changed for years - there is almost complete isolation. It has been more than a month since the world witnessed tens of thousands of Buddhist monks in saffron robes marching in solidarity with the Burmese people, protesting the military junta in that country.
NEWS
By Henry Chu and Henry Chu,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 27, 2007
NEW DELHI -- The street protests roiling military-ruled Myanmar turned deadly yesterday when at least one anti-government demonstrator was killed after security forces cracked down on the growing unrest, according to news and witness accounts trickling out of the closed-off country. Dozens of protesters, many of them Buddhist monks clad in burgundy robes, were said to have been beaten and dragged off by authorities as they rallied in the capital, Yangon, for the ninth straight day. Protests were also reported in Mandalay, the second-largest city in Myanmar, formerly known as Burma.
NEWS
April 17, 2005
THE MILITARY JUNTA strangling Myanmar has survived with a lot of help from its Southeast Asian neighbors. After all, Myanmar's generals offer natural resources, slave labor and a profitable drug trade. And anyway, a key principle of the region's top political organization, the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, has long been noninterference in its members' internal affairs. But Myanmar is to take over leadership of ASEAN next year. And given the regime's brutality, that honor finally is proving embarrassing enough that officials from some of the group's 10 members - Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia and the Philippines - have been calling for preventing Myanmar from assuming this chairmanship.
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