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February 23, 2010
awmakers in Annapolis ought to follow some legislative equivalent of the physicians' ethical tenet, primum non nocere or "first, do no harm." As various versions of the axiom have only been around since Ancient Greece, perhaps it hasn't gotten on the General Assembly calendar quite yet. At least that might explain the latest gyrations in the State House over legislation to regulate the scrap metal industry. Step one ought to be to make sure that whatever regulations are proposed, they are at least as effective as what local governments already require.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2010
A former high-ranking official who oversaw the state's pretrial detention centers pleaded guilty Thursday to stealing from arrestees money that had been contaminated with body fluids and burying most of it in a junkyard. Benjamin F. Brown, 60, of Crofton, was fired in August from his position of deputy commissioner of the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services' pretrial division. His responsibilities included oversight of Baltimore's Central Booking and Intake Facility, the first stop for people arrested in the city.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2010
A former high-ranking official who oversaw the state's pretrial detention centers pleaded guilty Thursday to stealing from arrestees money that had been contaminated with body fluids and burying most of it in a junkyard. Benjamin F. Brown, 60, of Crofton, was fired in August from his position of deputy commissioner of the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services' pretrial division. His responsibilities included oversight of Baltimore's Central Booking and Intake Facility, the first stop for people arrested in the city.
NEWS
February 23, 2010
Lawmakers in Annapolis ought to follow some legislative equivalent of the physicians' ethical tenet, primum non nocere or "first, do no harm." As various versions of the axiom have only been around since Ancient Greece, perhaps it hasn't gotten on the General Assembly calendar quite yet. At least that might explain the latest gyrations in the State House over legislation to regulate the scrap metal industry. Step one ought to be to make sure that whatever regulations are proposed, they are at least as effective as what local governments already require.
NEWS
August 21, 1996
Two separate fires that destroyed 20 cars and four trailers at a Mount Airy junkyard early yesterday were deliberately set, according to the state fire marshal.Fifteen firefighters from Mount Airy and Lisbon in Howard County responded at 2: 05 a.m. to the fires at Auto Parts Exchange in the 3900 block of Twin Arch Road.They remained at the scene for three hours. No one was injured.Damage was estimated at $5,000.FireWinfield: Firefighters assisted Mount Airy at 2: 40 a.m. Tuesday, transferring an engine to Mount Airy.
NEWS
January 23, 2002
Howard County firefighters, joined by others from neighboring Anne Arundel and Prince George's counties, were working late last night to contain a fire that erupted in a large auto junkyard that stores thousands of old tires and junk vehicles. Capt. Gary Jones, a county fire spokesman, said the blaze at Crazy Ray's Auto Parts junkyard in the 8100 block of Washington Blvd. in Savage was reported at 8:50 p.m. and quickly went to the equivalent of two alarms. Jones said the several-acre site is isolated, which made it difficult to get water to the scene.
NEWS
BY A SUN REPORTER | October 17, 2005
A Mount Airy junkyard fire burned 150 vehicles yesterday and sent smoke billowing for miles from southwest Carroll County, fire officials said. Firefighters were dispatched to the 3900 block of Twin Arch Road at 6:46 p.m. A fire dispatcher said several surrounding fire and police departments assisted in putting out the blaze, which was under control by 11 p.m. Officials could not say if the fire caused any injuries and were assessing damages and trying...
NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,Staff Writer | June 11, 1993
An elderly Clarksville man and his nephew won a preliminary victory yesterday in their nine-month battle to keep open a longtime junkyard on Hall Shop Road.Ellis Wise, 50, who operates the junkyard with his 80-year-old uncle, George Wise, heard the decision with painful relief."Why'd they have to put me through all this?" he said, sobbing as relatives guided him from the meeting room.Bill O'Brien, chief of zoning for Howard County, would not reveal details about the complaint his office received in April 1992, when the legality of the junkyard operation was first questioned.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | July 7, 1999
When the banks of Double Pipe Creek overflow in the low-lying community of Detour, tires, oil, antifreeze, fuel, car parts and sometimes entire vehicles from a local junkyard are carried downstream or washed into the town's streets. In their latest effort to offer Detour residents some relief, county officials are asking the state to help buy the 3-acre junkyard and put it to another use. "I think it's a good thing for the county to do to eliminate the pollution of streams," said Commissioner Donald I. Dell, who has sought funds to buy the property the last three years.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,SUN STAFF | January 26, 1996
DETOUR -- Occasional floods have become a way of life in this low-lying village along Double Pipe Creek, but residents here say recent floods -- including the one a week ago -- have been made worse by floating debris from a junkyard upstream from the Route 77 bridge."
NEWS
BY A SUN REPORTER | October 17, 2005
A Mount Airy junkyard fire burned 150 vehicles yesterday and sent smoke billowing for miles from southwest Carroll County, fire officials said. Firefighters were dispatched to the 3900 block of Twin Arch Road at 6:46 p.m. A fire dispatcher said several surrounding fire and police departments assisted in putting out the blaze, which was under control by 11 p.m. Officials could not say if the fire caused any injuries and were assessing damages and trying...
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 5, 2005
A junkyard fire in Baltimore County yesterday evening sent thick black clouds of smoke into the sky, visible for miles until the tire blaze was quelled by about 80 firefighters. Calls began pouring in from "near and far," said Baltimore County Fire Department Capt. Jim Korn, with people reporting the dark plumes of smoke as firefighters worked to determine the exact location of the fire. They found it at Ewing's Used Cars & Parts, a salvage yard off Bengies Road, where a 1,000-square-foot swath of tires and oxygen tanks burned amid minor explosions, Korn said.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | May 20, 2005
On Jan. 17, the engine from a Thor rocket launched 31 years ago was soaring southward, 550 miles over the African continent. At the same time, a fragment of a Chinese rocket that blew up five years ago was high over the Pacific Ocean, also headed south. Incredibly, the two chunks of metal flew into the same spot over Antarctica at the same instant. The high-speed collision, reported last month by NASA's Orbital Debris Quarterly News, created even more orbiting space junk. It also drew renewed attention to the litter that surrounds our planet - and efforts to keep the neighborhood from becoming even more cluttered and dangerous.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey | April 28, 2005
Current members: Brian Simms, vocals, keyboard, accordion; Sterling Patterson, guitar; John Aversa, bass; Andy Hamburger, drums; Todd Butler, trumpet; Trevor Specht, sax; Jeff Chiaverini, trombone. Founded in: 1999 Style: New Orleans Funk Influenced by: Professor Longhair, Dr. John, Los Lobos, Galactic. Notable: The band is recording its sophomore CD. It will be released in June. Quotable: Simms on how people should feel when they walk away after a show: "Hopefully they dance away.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | April 5, 2003
MY MISSION in life, at least for this month, is to find a junkyard hubcap that fits the right rear wheel of my station wagon. Technically, I am looking for the "center ornament" of the wheel cover, the silver-looking circle, about 7 inches in diameter, that covers the lug nuts of the 1993 Ford Taurus. How the original hubcap disappeared remains a family mystery. My interrogations of the usual suspects - my wife and teen-age son - have not yielded much information. My wife was able to conjure up a vague recollection of hitting a "major pothole at a pretty good clip" sometime within the past two weeks.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2002
Clarksville was in the boondocks when a pair of automobile junkyards opened on Hall Shop Road more than a half-century ago. Now it's one of the premier addresses in the seventh-wealthiest county in the nation. The adjoining junkyards are still there - surrounded by houses priced at $500,000 and more. It's hardly a fabulous view for the well-heeled crowd, but most neighbors are keenly aware of who was there first. The new Colonials and sport utility vehicles that transformed the community have peacefully coexisted with the 16 acres of old cars and trucks.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Evening Sun Staff | May 21, 1991
When the Wells McComas Citizens Improvement Association began its efforts to shut down an illegal junkyard in the North Point community of eastern Baltimore County, Lyndon B. Johnson was president.Twenty-seven years later, a Baltimore Circuit Court judge may have finally put an end to the dispute when he ordered the owner to clean up the mess and close the junkyard.The ruling of Judge James T. Smith Jr., rendered last week, was released yesterday. In his order, he gave Oscar Meyers, the junkyard's owner, 30 days to remove all the old cars, trucks and other rusting pieces of junk from his property in the 3800 block of North Point Blvd.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | February 27, 1992
Pasadena already has eight junkyards and doesn't need a ninth, opponents of a proposed car dismantling and recycling plant said yesterday.CSX Realty, developers of a 2,273-home planned community on Marley Creek, and two salvage yard operators joined with area residents in asking the county Board of Appeals to deny a special exception needed to build the plant on 3.4 acres in the 6600 block of Fort Smallwood Road.Jack Feehly, president of the Greater Pasadena Council, which represents 28 communities, said residents have worked with CSX, which owns 1,600 acres in the area, to clean up Pasadena's image.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 19, 2002
THE STATISTICS are sobering: Not only are teen drivers more likely to be charged with speeding and reckless driving violations than other drivers are, but they account for more than their share of deaths related to motor vehicles. Driver inexperience is one major cause, a fact not lost on Barbie Schluth of Ellicott City, parent of a 16-year-old on the verge of receiving her driver's license. "Because of her inexperience, I fear she won't react quickly enough to other drivers' actions," Schluth says.
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