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NEWS
October 30, 2007
The controversy over Baltimore County Circuit Judge Susan M. Souder's decision to throw out the testimony of a fingerprint analyst in a death penalty trial hasn't stopped. Her opinion has reached universities, judicial chambers and evidence labs across the country. But it's the National Academy of Sciences review of the forensic science field now under way that could have real implications for analysis of fingerprints, hair and other physical evidence - and their use in criminal trials nationwide.
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NEWS
March 16, 2014
Sen. Ben Cardin's statement, "Water levels are increasing. Representing a coastal state like Maryland, we see that. We see the impact of [global warming]," was a clear sign that he understands the urgency of addressing global warming. Given the PR campaign by the dirty energy industry to spread junk science and deny climate change, it is critically important for elected officials to make statements like this. The next step is acting, and that means cleaning up our power plants - America's top source of carbon pollution - and shifting to wind, solar and energy efficiency.
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NEWS
March 3, 1993
A baby is born with a birth defect. His mother had taken an anti-nausea drug during pregnancy. She sues the drug company, claiming that its drug caused the defect. Each party produces scientists to testify on opposite sides of the question of whether the drug is safe. Then a jury, usually including no scientists, decides which scientists to believe.But not this time. In Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals, more than 30 scientific studies had concluded that there was no statistical link between birth defects and the drug Bendectin.
NEWS
July 8, 2013
Thank you for publishing the commentary by Dee Hodges on the latest example of Annapolis' fiscal irresponsibility, the so-called "rain tax" ("Focusing on the wrong threat to the bay," July 4). To her point that it doesn't deal with the real cause of poor Chesapeake Bay water quality, I also question how such a tax can be apportioned to taxpayers' property. Judging from local government discussions here in Harford County, there appears to be no objective procedure for apportionment based upon known principles of calculating runoff.
NEWS
By Kieron F. Quinn | November 6, 1991
ROBERT PARK, a physicist at the University of Maryland, makes the "point" (Other Voices, Sept. 12) that 60-hertz magnetic fields are no more dangerous than artichokes or shoe polish.Clearly revealing why he is a professor of physics and not of biochemistry, epidemiology or medicine, Park advances increasingly tenuous analogies ultimately reaching the conclusion that dioxin, cyclamates and asbestos are not particularly harmful either.In a long and very detailed 1990 report, the Environmental Protection Agency concluded that electromagnetic radiation posed a "probable" cancer risk.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | March 11, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The Independent Women's Forum held a conference last month to examine a hot topic: ''Women's Health, Law and the Junking of Science.''The orthodox view on the medical establishment's treatment of women is that they are victimized. Women, it is often charged, are denied their rightful representation in clinical trials of new drugs. Women are gulled into accepting unsafe products, like silicone-gel breast implants. Women are denied safe and effective birth control.The panel of experts demonstrated all those assumptions to be myths -- but myths advanced and strengthened by feminist scholarship.
NEWS
By Orlando Sentinel | June 19, 1994
MIAMI -- It's a question that will not die: Did Stuart, Fla., dentist David Acer infect Kimberly Bergalis and five other patients with the AIDS virus before going to his grave?Four years after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta concluded that he did, a Miami Beach physician is assailing the scientific evidence the institute relied upon: DNA tests."The CDC evidence is not absolutely correct -- far from it," virologist Lionel Resnick said Friday. "Based on the findings, you can't conclude . . . Dr. Acer infected his patients."
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | October 14, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court moved yesterday into the midst of the long legal battle over a pregnancy drug, no longer in use, that some experts claim was a cause of birth defects in many children.By taking on a significant new case about the morning-sickness drug Bendectin in a brief order, the court also put itself in a position to rule on one of the Bush administration's election-year complaints against lawyers.That complaint, repeated often by Vice President Dan Quayle, is that lawyers use "junk science" to try to sway juries to bring in verdicts against drug companies and other manufacturers of consumer products.
NEWS
July 8, 2013
Thank you for publishing the commentary by Dee Hodges on the latest example of Annapolis' fiscal irresponsibility, the so-called "rain tax" ("Focusing on the wrong threat to the bay," July 4). To her point that it doesn't deal with the real cause of poor Chesapeake Bay water quality, I also question how such a tax can be apportioned to taxpayers' property. Judging from local government discussions here in Harford County, there appears to be no objective procedure for apportionment based upon known principles of calculating runoff.
NEWS
March 11, 1993
'Junk science' misleads a gullible publicI take issue with your statement in "Junk science in the courtroom" (editorial, March 3) that "scientists are often sharply divided among themselves -- as the debates over biological evolution, global warming, and 'Big Bang' cosmology suggest."That statement itself reflects the scientific naivete the editor was speaking against, and it can only comfort purveyors of a certain type of "junk science."For example, the debates over evolution result primarily from creation "scientists" who are trying to foster their "junk science" on a scientifically naive population.
NEWS
December 25, 2011
What if Maryland's governor initiated a plan to incrementally reduce local planning authority and concentrate it in the hands of unaccountable technocrats in Annapolis? What if he dusted off a 37-year-old law and used it as a pretext to implement this plan? What if the science behind the effort was not genuine, objective science, but junk science? What if the process of developing the plan has not been one of true consensus building and collaboration, as Maryland Planning Secretary Richard Hall has repeatedly suggested?
NEWS
February 8, 2009
When British researchers asked five crime lab examiners to evaluate a series of fingerprints, they were told one pair had been mistakenly matched to a terrorism suspect. The experts reached conflicting results. Only one judged the prints identical. The fingerprint examiners later learned that the samples were prints they each had previously reviewed and found to be the same. The study by Itiel E. Dror and two colleagues underscores what some defense attorneys in Maryland and elsewhere have argued - forensic experts can be influenced, and not in justice's favor.
NEWS
February 20, 2004
INTERPRETATION OF scientific data to fit a desired conclusion has been going on for eons. That whole flat-Earth flap comes quickly to mind. But the Bush administration has taken the manipulation of government research for political purposes to a perverse new level that denies even the president the benefit of the most accurate analysis. So says a report released this week by what the White House described as "a distinguished group of scientists and educators," including 20 Nobel laureates and honored veterans of past Republican administrations.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | May 9, 1998
A Baltimore County jury has ordered Nissan to pay $4 million to the widow of a Carroll County man who died in a 1994 crash, after deciding that the steering column on the man's pickup truck -- which killed him on impact -- was designed defectively.The verdict, reached Thursday after a three-week trial, prompted a California-based Nissan lawyer to call the case "a rank example junk science" yesterday.Nicholas Wittner, assistant general counsel for Nissan North America, said the automaker will ask Baltimore County Circuit Judge Lawrence R. Daniels to throw out the jury verdict and find that the company was not at fault.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | March 11, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The Independent Women's Forum held a conference last month to examine a hot topic: ''Women's Health, Law and the Junking of Science.''The orthodox view on the medical establishment's treatment of women is that they are victimized. Women, it is often charged, are denied their rightful representation in clinical trials of new drugs. Women are gulled into accepting unsafe products, like silicone-gel breast implants. Women are denied safe and effective birth control.The panel of experts demonstrated all those assumptions to be myths -- but myths advanced and strengthened by feminist scholarship.
NEWS
By Orlando Sentinel | June 19, 1994
MIAMI -- It's a question that will not die: Did Stuart, Fla., dentist David Acer infect Kimberly Bergalis and five other patients with the AIDS virus before going to his grave?Four years after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta concluded that he did, a Miami Beach physician is assailing the scientific evidence the institute relied upon: DNA tests."The CDC evidence is not absolutely correct -- far from it," virologist Lionel Resnick said Friday. "Based on the findings, you can't conclude . . . Dr. Acer infected his patients."
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | May 9, 1998
A Baltimore County jury has ordered Nissan to pay $4 million to the widow of a Carroll County man who died in a 1994 crash, after deciding that the steering column on the man's pickup truck -- which killed him on impact -- was designed defectively.The verdict, reached Thursday after a three-week trial, prompted a California-based Nissan lawyer to call the case "a rank example junk science" yesterday.Nicholas Wittner, assistant general counsel for Nissan North America, said the automaker will ask Baltimore County Circuit Judge Lawrence R. Daniels to throw out the jury verdict and find that the company was not at fault.
NEWS
March 16, 2014
Sen. Ben Cardin's statement, "Water levels are increasing. Representing a coastal state like Maryland, we see that. We see the impact of [global warming]," was a clear sign that he understands the urgency of addressing global warming. Given the PR campaign by the dirty energy industry to spread junk science and deny climate change, it is critically important for elected officials to make statements like this. The next step is acting, and that means cleaning up our power plants - America's top source of carbon pollution - and shifting to wind, solar and energy efficiency.
NEWS
March 11, 1993
'Junk science' misleads a gullible publicI take issue with your statement in "Junk science in the courtroom" (editorial, March 3) that "scientists are often sharply divided among themselves -- as the debates over biological evolution, global warming, and 'Big Bang' cosmology suggest."That statement itself reflects the scientific naivete the editor was speaking against, and it can only comfort purveyors of a certain type of "junk science."For example, the debates over evolution result primarily from creation "scientists" who are trying to foster their "junk science" on a scientifically naive population.
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