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NEWS
By Andrew Ratner | April 20, 2008
Sander DeVries and his brothers were complaining about junk mail a few years ago, but unlike complaints about the weather, they did decide to do something about it. They began contacting several large direct-mail companies and catalog publishers to request they stop sending stuff to their homes. Their junk-mail flow slowed. They encouraged family members and friends to do the same, but most said it was too much hassle. From that sentiment, the nonprofit 41pounds.org was born - named for average volume of junk mail every American receives in a year.
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NEWS
December 7, 2011
What sacrifice is Congress making in order to improve the U.S. Postal Service efficiency and reduce costs ("'Snail mail' could get slower under Post Service plan," Nov. 6)? All I see are sacrifices made to the consumer. Why not start by cutting out Congressional mailings? In 2007, the Congressional Research Service prepared a report for Congress advising representatives that the "franking" privilege had cost taxpayers $113.4 million in current dollars from 1988 to 2007. House members spent more than $45 million in 2009 on taxpayer-funded mass mailings.
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NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | April 15, 1991
Like the paraphernalia in any junk drawer, the items cover much of the floor of Mark Freundel's weight room.There are hand-sized carpet samples, a can of dog food, a tiny canister of hair coloring, pet-care catalogs, circulars advertising backyard swimming pools, hearing aids and retirement homes.All of it has come in the mail -- unsolicited and unwanted -- to the apartment that Mr. Freundel shares with his fiancee, Barbara Sheckells.This isn't your everyday pocketful of junk mail. This is a scrap yard full, one that began arriving shortly after the couple moved into their Catonsville apartment in August 1989 and has never let up."
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner | April 20, 2008
Sander DeVries and his brothers were complaining about junk mail a few years ago, but unlike complaints about the weather, they did decide to do something about it. They began contacting several large direct-mail companies and catalog publishers to request they stop sending stuff to their homes. Their junk-mail flow slowed. They encouraged family members and friends to do the same, but most said it was too much hassle. From that sentiment, the nonprofit 41pounds.org was born - named for average volume of junk mail every American receives in a year.
FEATURES
By Jana Sanchez-Klein and Jana Sanchez-Klein,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 28, 1996
PHILADELPHIA -- Here's what you've got to undertand about Sanford Wallace, the enterprising, friendly young man known in cyberspace as the Spam King. He's not trying to annoy anyone.All he's trying to do, he explains, is make money. Nothing wrong with that, right? It's the American way.So every day, Sanford Wallace sits down at his computer terminal in his rowhouse office in Northeast Philadelphia and edits the advertisements that make him the most hated man on the Internet.WIN! WIN!! HOME BUSINESS -- NO MONEY DOWN!
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | March 20, 2000
The Census undercount that really hurts is of all those people who threw out the junk mail without looking. If Himmelrich and Tufaro can manage to fill Montgomery Ward's gigantic old warehouse with vibrant businesses, O'Malley will be hailed as a genius. Charlton Heston should drop that NRA role. He never made a convincing villian. If they can child-proof an aspirin bottle, why not a gun?
NEWS
December 7, 2011
What sacrifice is Congress making in order to improve the U.S. Postal Service efficiency and reduce costs ("'Snail mail' could get slower under Post Service plan," Nov. 6)? All I see are sacrifices made to the consumer. Why not start by cutting out Congressional mailings? In 2007, the Congressional Research Service prepared a report for Congress advising representatives that the "franking" privilege had cost taxpayers $113.4 million in current dollars from 1988 to 2007. House members spent more than $45 million in 2009 on taxpayer-funded mass mailings.
FEATURES
By ALICE STEINBACH | March 5, 1994
Women, I have observed, fall into two main categories: Those who are Martha Stewart and those who are not.I, after a long period of denial, am resigned to being part of the latter group.In other words: It's over. I give up. Uncle!Or to be completely non-sexist: Uncle! and Aunt!What can I tell you?I tried raising my own free-range chickens. I tried making curtains from bedsheets. I tried creating centerpieces from gourds and Gouda. I tried garnishing desserts with apple-tree branches -- from my own orchard -- dipped in chocolate.
BUSINESS
By Liz Pulliam Weston and Liz Pulliam Weston,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 9, 2001
I may be getting married in 2002, and I wonder about the so-called marriage penalty in the federal tax code. What is the latest word on that? Would it be wise to postpone my marriage to 2003 to avoid this penalty? Unless your intended is extraordinarily patient, the answer is no. You'd need to postpone your wedding until at least 2005, and even that might not help. Most of the marriage-penalty relief that was passed by Congress this summer doesn't even begin to take effect for three years, and its full impact won't be felt until 2009.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | April 10, 2000
Last week, in SpamFighting 101, we talked about keeping out of the sights of the junk e-mailers who turn our Inboxes into billboards for porn sites and phony-diploma mills. This week, in SF 102, we'll talk about dealing with the garbage that pours down the mail pipe despite your best efforts to avoid it. First, consider that there are two kinds of junk mail. The first comes from a legitimate merchant or Web site that got your name as part of a transaction you were involved in. For example, you may have purchased a CD online, registered software or done something else to put yourself in the line of fire.
NEWS
By Charles Fleming | December 18, 2007
I received the nicest e-mail last week from Daisy Larkin Pritchard, telling me my order had been approved. Later that day, the happy news was repeated by Janice Accuracy Hutchinson and Davina Bovine Shoemaker, and again that night by Carmella Iniquitous Stovall and Iva Cowhide Dahl. These e-mails intrigued me not only because of the names of their senders but because I hadn't placed any order. They arrived in my AOL "spam" folder, where they joined similarly uninvited correspondence from Vince Episodic Trujillo, Christian Bite Fernandez and Rigoberto Handset Prince, plus two dozen other notes, some written in Cyrillic and promising Russian delights, and others in Japanese kanji and katakana.
NEWS
By Lisa Rogak | August 28, 2007
Here we go again. Michigan has joined Florida and South Carolina to become the latest to muscle in on New Hampshire's first-in-the-nation turf in an effort to reduce the influence this cold, flinty state has in deciding who makes it to the Oval Office. Talk is of a Jan. 15 primary, though Michigan's Sen. Carl Levin, a Democrat, favors Jan. 8. This means Granite Staters would cast their ballots sometime between polishing off the last of the Christmas eggnog and toasting the New Year, all because the New Hampshire constitution requires the presidential primary be held a week before any others.
BUSINESS
By Craig Crossman and Craig Crossman,McClatchy-Tribune | April 12, 2007
Once, I used to get a few hundred pieces of spam a day. Now I get around 14,000 - and there's no end in sight. This has forced me to leave my computer on all the time, because when I used to turn it off at the end of the day, the process of downloading the thousands of e-mails that accrued during the night took nearly an hour. And by the time that hour of downloading finished, so much more spam had been received by the server that another half-hour or so was needed to download that batch of several thousand.
NEWS
June 12, 2005
AS WE WALKED up the driveway the other day, we thought about the French philosopher John-Paul Sartre's definition of hell as "other people." Stopping short of the hubbub on the street, we fetched the newspaper off the grass and the mail from the box. The stamps we ordered from the Postal Service Web site were there -- Thank God! -- and so were our latest choices from the mail-order video rental service. There weren't too many bills because, more and more, we pay these online with our credit card.
BUSINESS
August 15, 2004
Excuse me, but I must write this column in haste. Having just returned from a trip, I find my mailbox stuffed with urgent financial materials that I must act upon immediately. "Important information about your financial account" reads one envelope. Another has the stamp: "Dated material. Immediate response required." Better yet: "Enclosed is an upgrade to your account." Another envelope doesn't say anything at all, but peering through its clear cellophane window I can see what looks like a nice check with the name of yours truly on it. These envelopes with business logos, even the ones bearing the name of a financial institution holding an account of mine, have one thing in common: They are junk financial mail designed to trick me into thinking they're so important that I must open them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | January 8, 2004
THE FEDERAL Can-Spam law took effect New Year's Day, but the people who send me junk mail aren't paying attention. When I opened my inbox at work Monday after the holiday, I found the usual 50 or 60 pitches for prescription painkillers, sexual aids, mortgage refinancing deals and porn sites, along with four variations on the venerable Nigerian bank scam. As usual, I spent a few minutes deleting the junk and saving the Nigerian scam offers, which I collect because I love the wondrous liberties they take with the English language.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | April 19, 1993
Tony Everett grimaced as if he were holding something unclean. In his hands was an envelope designed to resemble a Federal Express package. Out of it spilled a crudely designed pitch for direct-mail services."
NEWS
By Robert Schroeder | September 27, 2002
WASHINGTON -- I received a very nice invitation the other day to play poker with Wendy O'Brien. I enjoy poker and briefly considered the offer, as I hadn't played in a long time. But there was one small problem: I have no idea who is Wendy O'Brien. My invitation from Ms. O'Brien appeared in my e-mail box, along with 21 other pieces of spam, or electronic junk mail. Let me, for posterity, note others I received that day: The address "Inquiries" told me I qualified for a diploma. MaryJo sent me an "expiration notice."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | April 24, 2003
How many keystrokes and mouse clicks do you make in the course of a day? A few hundred? A few thousand? I thought about this as I was going through my spam this week. Or, should I say, sorting through my e-mail and eliminating the spam. Despite a companywide spam filter, I get 20 to 40 pieces of junk mail at work on the average day - maybe 60 to 70 on Mondays, when I have to wade through the garbage that accumulates over the weekend. But let's say that on the average, I get 30 daily messages offering cut-rate mortgages, auto insurance, work-at-home schemes, Nigerian oil scams, love-life stimulants and intimate portraits of lonely Russian housewives.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | October 29, 2002
The more than 1 million vehicle registration renewal forms being sent to Maryland motorists over the next year will be accompanied by something extra - ads for a free oil change and $25 off on an eye exam. The advertising packets are part of an agreement between two state agencies and a Waltham, Mass.-based company that saves the Motor Vehicle Administration $100,000 a year and helps the Department of Business and Economic Development promote in-state tourism. Imagitas Inc. has taken over the printing and mailing of the MVA's vehicle registration forms in exchange for the right to include advertisements in the envelope.
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