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NEWS
August 23, 2012
Eighteen billion dollars. That is how much money American taxpayers have paid since 1995 to subsidize the production of four junk food ingredients: high fructose corn syrup, corn syrup, corn starch, and soy oil. Instead of using our tax money to produce healthy fruits and vegetables, the dollars major agribusinesses receive from the federal government too often ends up as empty calories. This is government waste at its finest. It's even more ridiculous given that rates of childhood obesity have tripled in the past three decades.
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NEWS
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
When Michael and Melissa Peters began planning their wedding, they knew that when the reception was over, they wouldn't be ready for the night to end. So after the last dance, instead of sending their guests off to the hotel, the Peters kept the party going with a visit from their favorite Baltimore food truck. The couple, who live in Canton, held their reception at the American Visionary Art Museum . As that celebration was winding down, the Kooper's Chowhound food truck pulled up to the museum's courtyard, where guests continued the party as they ate burgers served right off the grill.
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NEWS
August 22, 2012
At a time when nearly a third of Maryland children between ages 10 and 17 are either overweight or obese, you'd think there'd be a law against selling junk food and sugary drinks on school grounds. Wrong. While many in-school cafeterias in Maryland, including those in Baltimore City, are making a good-faith effort to put more nutritious foods on their menus - more fresh fruits and vegetables, fewer fatty burgers and fries - as long as kids can scarf down the less-healthful alternatives available in vending machines on the premises, the fight against childhood obesity will remain an uphill battle.
FEATURES
By Kristine Henry,
The Baltimore Sun
| September 2, 2013
I'm going to fess up to this: I used to disdain all things football. The game seemed like three hours of waiting around with approximately two minutes of action interspersed in 10-second bursts. I didn't understand how running two feet before being tackled could count for anything or be remotely interesting to watch. Football was simply something that distracted the menfolk on Thanksgiving and gave them an excuse for not helping in the kitchen. I felt that people should be focusing on issues like income inequality, climate change and public school curriculum instead of a bunch of highly paid athletes in helmets and tight pants.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | July 25, 2012
The federal government doled out taxpayer subsidies last year that went to support $1.28 billion in junk food, an analysis by MaryPIRG found. In a report released Wednesday the consumer advocacy group said that since 1995 $18.2 billion has gone to support junk food. The amount is enough to buy 2.9 billion Twinkies a year, the group said. In comparison, about $637 million subsidies has gone towards apples since 2005, enough to buy 77 million apples per year. About 75 percent of the subsidies go to just 3.8 percent of farmers, the group said.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | May 7, 2012
First Lady Michelle Obama is on a mission to get our kids to eat healthy, but every now and then she is known to indulge on a cheeseburger or other food that is not so good for the body. A few years ago she made a lunch run with staff to a Five Guys inWashington, D.C. Well, a physicians group said this is a no-no and wants Michelle Obama and the rest of the first family not to be photographed eating unhealthy foods. The Physicans Committee for Responsible Medicine said that President Obama has posed in a number of staged photos eating unhealthy foods, including hot dogs at a basketball game with British Prime Minister David Cameron.
NEWS
By David Gray | August 31, 2007
In a few days, Congress will return to reauthorize the State Children's Health Insurance Program, or SCHIP. The program will pay for expanded coverage for children through an increase in cigarette taxes. The logic is to raise revenue while discouraging a behavior harmful to child health. Instead of a cigarette tax, however, Congress should address the health problem that research indicates is the greatest crisis facing America's young people by taxing junk food instead. The new epidemic facing American children is obesity.
NEWS
By Jeff Jacoby | November 17, 1998
YOU DIDN'T object when they forced motorcyclists to wear helmets. It's for their own good, you figured. And it was no skin off your nose, since you don't ride motorcycles anyway.You didn't protest when they passed mandatory seat-belt laws. You couldn't see what the big deal was -- after all, you've always buckled up.You didn't say anything when they pushed tobacco ads off the air, or when they drove up the price of cigarettes with sin taxes, or when they tried to classify nicotine as a drug.
SPORTS
By Don Markusand Milton Kent and Don Markusand Milton Kent,Sun Staff Correspondents | March 31, 1991
INDIANAPOLIS -- Duke center Christian Laettner had more to think about than stopping Nevada-Las Vegas in last night's second semifinal game in the National Collegiate Athletic Association tournament at the Hoosier Dome."
NEWS
By JEREMY MANIER AND DELROY ALEXANDER and JEREMY MANIER AND DELROY ALEXANDER,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 7, 2005
CHICAGO -- The nation's premier science organization urged Congress yesterday to consider restricting the marketing of junk food to children if food companies do not cut back on their own, upping the stakes in the national obesity debate. The new report by the National Academy of Sciences is considered the most authoritative review to date of how junk food ads and marketing threaten the health of young children. To help reverse that influence, the report recommends that food companies stop targeting kids with "spokescharacters," such as SpongeBob SquarePants and Barbie dolls, to promote foods high in calories and low in nutrients.
NEWS
Marta H. Mossburg | July 2, 2013
I don't think about food, except in the sense that when my kids are hungry, they need it fast. I know that's bad. My poor planning often means running to the freezer to dig out chicken nuggets or fish sticks or a pizza to pop into the oven or turning to a box of macaroni and cheese to anchor a meal in 15 minutes or less. I frequently feel guilty about this Pavlovian response both from a bad nutrition standpoint and from the voice in the back of my head coming from my stepmother who thinks feeding children anything but organic everything borders on child abuse and banishes to the back of her pantry the food we bring for the duration of our visits.
NEWS
June 23, 2013
Thanks for the recent article highlighting two businesses that are working to provide healthier food choices in Baltimore ("Two city stores move to close health gap," June 18). I work in the office complex next to Apples & Oranges, one of the highlighted businesses, and have the luxury of being able to purchase lunch once or twice a week when I am at the office. Until the opening of Apples & Oranges, there weren't great options in the area, only McDonald's, Wendy's and Subway.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | February 26, 2013
Food banks across the country are adopting policies to make sure the people they serve get nutritious meals, according to Yale research. The groups that help feed the hungry are concerned about the rise in obesity and other illnesses even in those people who cannot afford steady meals, the researchers at the Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity found.  The study was published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Many who have problems buying food can only afford staples that aren't the most nutritious.
NEWS
By Joanne Cavanaugh Simpson | November 20, 2012
By now all of the Twinkies, Ho Hos and other Hostess baked goods have been stripped from grocery store shelves — and countless tributes paid via Tweets, blogs and Facebook posts. After more than 80 years in business, Hostess declared it was going under last week, dropping off the last of its Wonder Bread and Zingers deliveries, possibly ending jobs for more than 18,000 people, and marking yet another sad demise of a venerable American business institution. Now, in a perhaps ill-fated 11th-hour round of negotiations with its workers, Hostess is struggling to escape the Great Recession sandpit, or get bought out. Yet this octogenarian snack king is really just the victim of another movement sweeping the country over the past couple decades: "low-fat" and "health food" trends, and the current government-sponsored anti-obesity campaign.
NEWS
August 25, 2012
Your recent editorial on childhood obesity calls on the state legislature to ban school vending machines that sell junk food ("Easy call in obesity fight," Aug. 23). But why every perceived problem demands a legislative solution is beyond me. Don't school principals already have the authority to determine what is sold in their school's vending machines? And if principals don't, what about county superintendents and school boards? If none of these officials have the authority to determine what will be sold in school vending machines, or even whether such machines should be allowed in the schools, what have we come to?
NEWS
August 23, 2012
Eighteen billion dollars. That is how much money American taxpayers have paid since 1995 to subsidize the production of four junk food ingredients: high fructose corn syrup, corn syrup, corn starch, and soy oil. Instead of using our tax money to produce healthy fruits and vegetables, the dollars major agribusinesses receive from the federal government too often ends up as empty calories. This is government waste at its finest. It's even more ridiculous given that rates of childhood obesity have tripled in the past three decades.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | February 16, 1992
ALBERTVILLE, France -- Bread. Water. M&M's. French fries.Herschel Walker calls this the diet of champions. In the world's culinary paradise, on the world's greatest sports stage, this millionaire athlete is dining on junk food and dreams.Yesterday, the former Heisman Trophy winner, the running back from the Minnesota Vikings, made his debut as a pusher-brakeman in the two-man bobsled at the 1992 Winter Olympics. And he did it fueled by bread, water, M&M's and french fries.On an icy, serpentine course in La Plagne, Walker took two rides with driver Brian Shimer, of Naples, Fla., in USA I, and was ninth in 2 minutes, 1.61 seconds.
NEWS
By Eric Adler and Eric Adler,Knight Ridder/Tribune | August 29, 1999
"Mommy, can I have some candy? Can I have a soda? Can I have some ice cream?""No," you say, convinced that in denying your child junk food, you're promoting proper eating habits and doing your child good.Well, Mom, hold on to your cookies. Recent research indicates otherwise.According to two studies led by Penn State nutritionist Jennifer Orlet Fisher and published this summer in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition and the journal Appetite, restricting a child's consumption of junk food is more likely to cause a child to want junk food that much more and, most significantly, to eat more of it when the opportunity arises.
NEWS
August 22, 2012
At a time when nearly a third of Maryland children between ages 10 and 17 are either overweight or obese, you'd think there'd be a law against selling junk food and sugary drinks on school grounds. Wrong. While many in-school cafeterias in Maryland, including those in Baltimore City, are making a good-faith effort to put more nutritious foods on their menus - more fresh fruits and vegetables, fewer fatty burgers and fries - as long as kids can scarf down the less-healthful alternatives available in vending machines on the premises, the fight against childhood obesity will remain an uphill battle.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | July 25, 2012
The federal government doled out taxpayer subsidies last year that went to support $1.28 billion in junk food, an analysis by MaryPIRG found. In a report released Wednesday the consumer advocacy group said that since 1995 $18.2 billion has gone to support junk food. The amount is enough to buy 2.9 billion Twinkies a year, the group said. In comparison, about $637 million subsidies has gone towards apples since 2005, enough to buy 77 million apples per year. About 75 percent of the subsidies go to just 3.8 percent of farmers, the group said.
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