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NEWS
April 3, 2005
On Monday, March 28, 2005 EMORY RAYMOND (JUNIE) POOLE, passed in Salisbury, NC. Just to notify friends and loved ones in the Baltimore Area. Send regards to Tammy Hartman,(daughter), to 6242 Stokes Ferry Road, Salisbury, NC 28071.
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NEWS
November 4, 2013
Junie B. in 'Jingle Bells, Batman Smells' will be performed by Casa Manana Theater at the Amoss Center on Friday, Nov. 15 at 7 p.m. Adapted from the Junie B. Jones series of books by Barbara Park, this is a musical for the whole family. Celebrate the season and sing along with the funniest first-grader around! Between taking part in the holiday pageant and picking a Secret Santa gift for her big rival Tattletale May, there's never a dull moment. Junie B. Jones will steal your heart and brighten your spirits with her lively holiday escapades.
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NEWS
By HELEN CHAPPELL | February 16, 1991
Oysterback, Maryland.Just by the way that his black robes flapped about him like the wings of an angry crow, regulars in Judge Findlay Sisk's courtroom could tell that he was in one of his black moods as he sailed in, taking his seat on the bench.The line between his bushy eyebrows was as deep as the Baltimore Canyon, and the assistant state's attorney, a young woman with the ink not yet quite dry on her law degree, stuck her Nicorette under the table as she exchanged a meaningful look with the baliff.
NEWS
June 29, 2007
Garnett Yelverton "Junie" Clark, a retired Annapolis businessman who maintained a lifelong interest in the history of Anne Arundel County, died of pneumonia and heart disease June 20 at Anne Arundel Medical Center. He was 91. Mr. Clark was born in Howard County and raised in Ellicott City. He was a 1932 graduate of the old Donaldson School and earned a bachelor's degree from St. John's College in 1936. After graduating from college, he sailed around the world as a merchant seaman onboard the Viking, a four-masted barque.
NEWS
July 19, 2000
"I liked 'Junie B. Jones Is (Almost) a Flowergirl' by Barbara Park because it is funny and has great illustrations. The very best thing, though, is the way Junie B. Jones talks." -- Markia Irvin Boyd, Brehms Lane Elementary "My favorite book is called 'The Elephant's Child' by Rudyard Kipling. It is about an elephant's child that keeps asking the same questions. Then one day, he asks a different question!" -- Rachel Dewberry, Lisbon Elementary "I like the book 'C. O. L. A. R.' by Alfred Slote.
NEWS
By HELEN CHAPPELL | August 24, 1991
He had done everything he could think of to do, and the damned engine still wouldn't turn over. Worse, while he'd been fiddling with it, trying to get it cranked up again, the workboat had been drifting steadily away from his lay and in toward shore. With a nudge, her bow hit mud bottom 20 feet from the bank, and the June Debbie gave a little sigh, as if she were saying ''well, what do you expect?''Junior Redmond, in the throes of a run of bad luck, expected nothing. He merely cursed, slamming the lid back down on the engine box, glaring into the cuddy, where the radio rankled with static.
NEWS
September 13, 2000
"I like the 'Junie B. Jones' series by Barbara Park because they have pictures and they are silly. In one of them, Junie said 'cheese' and she had something yellow and something blue on her teeth and it was very funny. I enjoy these stories." -- Jacqueline Myeasha Kiki Good Harford Heights Elementary "I like 'The Eleventh Hour' by Graeme Base because it has so many mysteries. I like finding the mice and hidden messages in the borders and pictures. Can you solve this 'who done it' in your first try?"
NEWS
By Helen Chappell | June 4, 1997
OYSTERBACK, Md. -- In June, as every kid knows, teachers get put in a closet with the textbooks, where they go into suspended animation until next September. Some of us who have a little more age on us and actually know people who teach, recognize the truth.Down here on the Shore, if teachers aren't in school themselves over the summer, they can become temporary cops in Ocean City, or work at Wal-Mart.Or, if they're Wimsey Jump, who teaches algebra, they can sign on with Huddie and Junie's grass cutting service, where they can ride around on great big rider mowers all day, cutting the enormous, environmentally comatose lawns of rich weekend people.
NEWS
By HELEN CHAPPELL | October 4, 1995
OYSTERBACK, Md. -- The orange and black crepe paper streamers flap in the chilled night air. The candle inside the jack-o-lantern is guttering down, making the wide grin look mean and sinister. It's as if old Jack sees something that you don't, those triangular eyes shifting this way and that with each spurt of the flame. That skeleton in the community center doorway is only paper, isn't it? It's a trick of the breeze, the way those bones dance and beckon to you. It's as if the skeleton is talking to that ghost hanging in the tree, the one that's supposed to be a sheet, but now -- with the mist rising -- it looks kind of like a spirit walking.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1998
Editor's note: Tom Horton paddles into unusual waters, the well-known but imaginary channels created by writer Helen Chappell.LAST WEEK, I paddled my kayak into a creek where the charts showed no creek existed. Night was coming on, and though it was clear and starry ahead, an odd fog blotted everything astern, pushing me ever deeper into the Dorchester marshes.No town existed in these parts, but around a bend, I came upon a fishing village. I glided silently past a dock where two shadowy figures were deep in conversation:"Think on this, Huddie," said the one called Junie:"If an infinite number of rednecks, driving an infinite number of pickup trucks, fires an infinite number of shotguns at an infinite number of road signs -- would they eventually reproduce all the world's great literature in Braille?"
NEWS
April 3, 2005
On Monday, March 28, 2005 EMORY RAYMOND (JUNIE) POOLE, passed in Salisbury, NC. Just to notify friends and loved ones in the Baltimore Area. Send regards to Tammy Hartman,(daughter), to 6242 Stokes Ferry Road, Salisbury, NC 28071.
NEWS
September 13, 2000
"I like the 'Junie B. Jones' series by Barbara Park because they have pictures and they are silly. In one of them, Junie said 'cheese' and she had something yellow and something blue on her teeth and it was very funny. I enjoy these stories." -- Jacqueline Myeasha Kiki Good Harford Heights Elementary "I like 'The Eleventh Hour' by Graeme Base because it has so many mysteries. I like finding the mice and hidden messages in the borders and pictures. Can you solve this 'who done it' in your first try?"
NEWS
July 19, 2000
"I liked 'Junie B. Jones Is (Almost) a Flowergirl' by Barbara Park because it is funny and has great illustrations. The very best thing, though, is the way Junie B. Jones talks." -- Markia Irvin Boyd, Brehms Lane Elementary "My favorite book is called 'The Elephant's Child' by Rudyard Kipling. It is about an elephant's child that keeps asking the same questions. Then one day, he asks a different question!" -- Rachel Dewberry, Lisbon Elementary "I like the book 'C. O. L. A. R.' by Alfred Slote.
FEATURES
July 8, 1998
"Without exception, every kindergarten class has a Junie B. Jones seated at one of the tables. This is the kid who (we fear) will never fully grasp the concept of raising one's hand before speaking. Her grammar is not always 'bestest.' And she struggles daily with a personality that is clearly too strong for her tender years. She is what some teachers affectionately refer to as 'a work in progress.' But even as they roll their eyes, you can see them start to grin."Barbara Park, authorThe Junie B. Jones series includes:"Junie B. Jones and a Little Monkey Business""Junie B. Jones and Her Big Fat Mouth""Junie B. Jones and Some Sneaky Peeky Spying""Junie B. Jones and That Meanie Jim's Birthday""Junie B. Jones and the Stupid Smelly Bus"Pub Date: 7/08/98
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1998
Editor's note: Tom Horton paddles into unusual waters, the well-known but imaginary channels created by writer Helen Chappell.LAST WEEK, I paddled my kayak into a creek where the charts showed no creek existed. Night was coming on, and though it was clear and starry ahead, an odd fog blotted everything astern, pushing me ever deeper into the Dorchester marshes.No town existed in these parts, but around a bend, I came upon a fishing village. I glided silently past a dock where two shadowy figures were deep in conversation:"Think on this, Huddie," said the one called Junie:"If an infinite number of rednecks, driving an infinite number of pickup trucks, fires an infinite number of shotguns at an infinite number of road signs -- would they eventually reproduce all the world's great literature in Braille?"
NEWS
By Helen Chappell | June 4, 1997
OYSTERBACK, Md. -- In June, as every kid knows, teachers get put in a closet with the textbooks, where they go into suspended animation until next September. Some of us who have a little more age on us and actually know people who teach, recognize the truth.Down here on the Shore, if teachers aren't in school themselves over the summer, they can become temporary cops in Ocean City, or work at Wal-Mart.Or, if they're Wimsey Jump, who teaches algebra, they can sign on with Huddie and Junie's grass cutting service, where they can ride around on great big rider mowers all day, cutting the enormous, environmentally comatose lawns of rich weekend people.
NEWS
By Helen Chappell | August 21, 1996
OYSTERBACK -- Chelsea Redmond has set up a snow cone stand down by the harbor this summer, and it's been quite a hit with both the watermen and the tourists, especially when the temperature reaches for 100 and the humidity lies so thick on the ground that you could take a jackhammer to it and make a dent in the atmosphere.For 75 cents, you can get a wax paper cup full of chipped ice and some exotic, sugary flavoring like Mango Peach or Limon Breeze or Blue Hawaii, then sit in the shade of a few sullen pin oaks at one of the picnic tables watching life pass you by, spooning in icy chemicals you'd probably rather not know the names of, even if you could pronounce them.
NEWS
By HELEN CHAPPELL | April 29, 1992
Oysterback, Maryland -- There's a spring moon out tonight, as full and yellow as one of Miss Nettie Leery's oyster fritters, and it's hanging in the sky, right above Oysterback.Beneath the glittering surface of the Devanau River and out among the grasses in Widgeon Marsh, the world is alive and moving. In the light of the full moon, things are out there fighting, eating, killing and mating, dying and being born, and the night is full of their sounds.Over at the edge of the old burial ground at Oysterback Hardshell Methodist Church, an 18-point buck, the exact same buck that Junie Redmond has been pursuing for years, is grazing on new forsythia shoots, one eye on his harem of does and their fawns, the other peeled for trouble.
NEWS
By Helen Chappell | August 21, 1996
OYSTERBACK -- Chelsea Redmond has set up a snow cone stand down by the harbor this summer, and it's been quite a hit with both the watermen and the tourists, especially when the temperature reaches for 100 and the humidity lies so thick on the ground that you could take a jackhammer to it and make a dent in the atmosphere.For 75 cents, you can get a wax paper cup full of chipped ice and some exotic, sugary flavoring like Mango Peach or Limon Breeze or Blue Hawaii, then sit in the shade of a few sullen pin oaks at one of the picnic tables watching life pass you by, spooning in icy chemicals you'd probably rather not know the names of, even if you could pronounce them.
NEWS
By HELEN CHAPPELL | October 4, 1995
OYSTERBACK, Md. -- The orange and black crepe paper streamers flap in the chilled night air. The candle inside the jack-o-lantern is guttering down, making the wide grin look mean and sinister. It's as if old Jack sees something that you don't, those triangular eyes shifting this way and that with each spurt of the flame. That skeleton in the community center doorway is only paper, isn't it? It's a trick of the breeze, the way those bones dance and beckon to you. It's as if the skeleton is talking to that ghost hanging in the tree, the one that's supposed to be a sheet, but now -- with the mist rising -- it looks kind of like a spirit walking.
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