Advertisement
HomeCollectionsJungle Gym
IN THE NEWS

Jungle Gym

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 4, 1997
SO IT'S VACATION -- and all the little ones are out enjoying a sneak preview of what summer will be like.It will be vastly more pleasant now that Savage Park is being renovated.Recently, the tennis courts were resurfaced. Instead of a peeling deck that looked like a sci-fi landscape, the new courts look terrific -- if a bit underused.However, this problem will soon disappear. The Howard County Department of Recreation and Parks is holding tennis classes this month at the park.Six-week sessions for middle schoolers, at 10 a.m. Saturdays, begin April 19. Classes for parents are at 11 a.m.For information about the tennis lessons, call 410-313-7275.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
The family of a Baltimore school student was awarded a $50,000 settlement after their son was severely injured on a faulty playground at Francis Scott Key Elementary/Middle School last year. The city's Board of Estimates approved the settlement this week, which stemmed from a $100,000 negligence lawsuit against the city school board for the boy's injuries. According to the claim approved by the city's board, the boy fractured his arms in March 2012 when he was pushed from the school's jungle gym. The jungle gym, the suit claimed, did not have retaining panels on the platform, which would have provided protection from a fall.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
The family of a Baltimore school student was awarded a $50,000 settlement after their son was severely injured on a faulty playground at Francis Scott Key Elementary/Middle School last year. The city's Board of Estimates approved the settlement this week, which stemmed from a $100,000 negligence lawsuit against the city school board for the boy's injuries. According to the claim approved by the city's board, the boy fractured his arms in March 2012 when he was pushed from the school's jungle gym. The jungle gym, the suit claimed, did not have retaining panels on the platform, which would have provided protection from a fall.
EXPLORE
By Allan Vought, Record staff | January 4, 2012
This column is in honor of my mother, Margaret Copeland Vought Smith, who died at age 90 on Dec. 11. We didn't spend much time together after I moved to Maryland following college in 1971. In fact, the last time we did anything together away from her own home was around 1994, when my mother and my wife and I had lunch together in Havre de Grace one afternoon. At the time, my mother was recently widowed from her second husband and was preparing to move to a continuing care community in Pennsylvania where she would live the rest of her life.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and David Michael Ettlin,Sun Staff Writer | June 10, 1994
A 5-year-old girl lost part of a little finger yesterday in a freak jungle gym accident on the playground of her South Baltimore elementary school.Kelly Champ's left pinkie was partially severed and stuck for more than an hour in a small hole on the climbing equipment's central pole. She was freed only after a doctor completed the amputation at the first joint behind the fingernail, officials said."She was a brave little girl," said Battalion Chief Hector L. Torres, a city fire department spokesman, describing Kelly's ordeal on the playground of Carter Godwin Woodson Elementary in Cherry Hill.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff Writer | May 5, 1993
Some men go to Queenstown Park, police say, for more than a stroll along the pathways through the woods. More than two dozen routinely show up at the park around lunchtime seeking homosexual liaisons, investigators say.As part of a sting operation prompted by complaints from residents who live nearby or use the park on Queenstown Road, county police have charged four men since Friday with indecent exposure and fourth-degree sex offenses, Detective Kevin...
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1997
Fewer than half of the 1,000 households in Provinces are willing to pay $12 a year to help the local civic association, but they might be required to pay that amount in a special tax.The Provinces Civic Association is trying to establish a community benefits district to raise $12,000 a year for community maintenance and other expenses.A petition asking for residents' support was sent out with the community newsletter this month. The petition probably will be distributed again after the county budget office, which overseas the districts, reviews the wording, said Marie Cook, president of the civic association.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | June 11, 2000
It's all-Hitchcock all weekend beginning Friday, as the eighth annual AMC Film Preservation Festival showcases one of cinema's most brilliant -- and most popular -- filmmakers. Four days of Alfred Hitchcock films may not have the same appeal for cineastes as some of the previous festivals, which have spotlighted artists whose work is seen less frequently. But if AMC is looking to attract lots of mainstream viewers, they probably couldn't have found a better centerpiece. The 32-film festival, which helps raise badly needed money for film preservation, kicks off at 8 p.m. Friday with a letterbox presentation (that's big-screen format on the small screen)
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | March 29, 1994
Two-year-old Ashley Wheeler was toddling along in the sunshine at Freedom Village Shopping Center. Anne Wheeler, a frequent shopper at the Liberty Road center, kept a careful watch as her daughter peered into a store window.The pair were watching the preopening progress of South Carroll's newest business: Play 'N Around Fun Center, which promises "fun for the entire family.""I hope it's open in time for Ashley's birthday next month," said Ms. Wheeler. "We could have a party there."Play 'N Around is scheduled to open Monday in the shopping center anchored by the Martin's supermarket.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | April 16, 2007
Payton Potachney knew exactly where the slides were behind Victory Villa Elementary School. Late Saturday morning, as he crossed a wooden footbridge onto school grounds, the Middle River boy who turns 3 next month left his grandmother's grasp and raced toward the cupola-covered jungle gym, family members said. Within minutes, the blond-haired toddler was gliding down his beloved slide. Then he screamed. The plastic slide had been coated with an industrial-strength drain cleaner containing sulfuric acid so caustic that it quickly burned through his clothes and began to peel away his skin.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | April 16, 2007
Payton Potachney knew exactly where the slides were behind Victory Villa Elementary School. Late Saturday morning, as he crossed a wooden footbridge onto school grounds, the Middle River boy who turns 3 next month left his grandmother's grasp and raced toward the cupola-covered jungle gym, family members said. Within minutes, the blond-haired toddler was gliding down his beloved slide. Then he screamed. The plastic slide had been coated with an industrial-strength drain cleaner containing sulfuric acid so caustic that it quickly burned through his clothes and began to peel away his skin.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | June 11, 2000
It's all-Hitchcock all weekend beginning Friday, as the eighth annual AMC Film Preservation Festival showcases one of cinema's most brilliant -- and most popular -- filmmakers. Four days of Alfred Hitchcock films may not have the same appeal for cineastes as some of the previous festivals, which have spotlighted artists whose work is seen less frequently. But if AMC is looking to attract lots of mainstream viewers, they probably couldn't have found a better centerpiece. The 32-film festival, which helps raise badly needed money for film preservation, kicks off at 8 p.m. Friday with a letterbox presentation (that's big-screen format on the small screen)
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1997
Fewer than half of the 1,000 households in Provinces are willing to pay $12 a year to help the local civic association, but they might be required to pay that amount in a special tax.The Provinces Civic Association is trying to establish a community benefits district to raise $12,000 a year for community maintenance and other expenses.A petition asking for residents' support was sent out with the community newsletter this month. The petition probably will be distributed again after the county budget office, which overseas the districts, reviews the wording, said Marie Cook, president of the civic association.
NEWS
By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 4, 1997
SO IT'S VACATION -- and all the little ones are out enjoying a sneak preview of what summer will be like.It will be vastly more pleasant now that Savage Park is being renovated.Recently, the tennis courts were resurfaced. Instead of a peeling deck that looked like a sci-fi landscape, the new courts look terrific -- if a bit underused.However, this problem will soon disappear. The Howard County Department of Recreation and Parks is holding tennis classes this month at the park.Six-week sessions for middle schoolers, at 10 a.m. Saturdays, begin April 19. Classes for parents are at 11 a.m.For information about the tennis lessons, call 410-313-7275.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and David Michael Ettlin,Sun Staff Writer | June 10, 1994
A 5-year-old girl lost part of a little finger yesterday in a freak jungle gym accident on the playground of her South Baltimore elementary school.Kelly Champ's left pinkie was partially severed and stuck for more than an hour in a small hole on the climbing equipment's central pole. She was freed only after a doctor completed the amputation at the first joint behind the fingernail, officials said."She was a brave little girl," said Battalion Chief Hector L. Torres, a city fire department spokesman, describing Kelly's ordeal on the playground of Carter Godwin Woodson Elementary in Cherry Hill.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | March 29, 1994
Two-year-old Ashley Wheeler was toddling along in the sunshine at Freedom Village Shopping Center. Anne Wheeler, a frequent shopper at the Liberty Road center, kept a careful watch as her daughter peered into a store window.The pair were watching the preopening progress of South Carroll's newest business: Play 'N Around Fun Center, which promises "fun for the entire family.""I hope it's open in time for Ashley's birthday next month," said Ms. Wheeler. "We could have a party there."Play 'N Around is scheduled to open Monday in the shopping center anchored by the Martin's supermarket.
EXPLORE
By Allan Vought, Record staff | January 4, 2012
This column is in honor of my mother, Margaret Copeland Vought Smith, who died at age 90 on Dec. 11. We didn't spend much time together after I moved to Maryland following college in 1971. In fact, the last time we did anything together away from her own home was around 1994, when my mother and my wife and I had lunch together in Havre de Grace one afternoon. At the time, my mother was recently widowed from her second husband and was preparing to move to a continuing care community in Pennsylvania where she would live the rest of her life.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 25, 1999
An Anne Arundel County judge this week threw out a $40,000 claim against Annapolis and the Historic Annapolis Foundation by the owner of a burned building in the city's historic district.The ruling does not stop Ronald B. Hollander from filing his claim in a new lawsuit, however.184-186 Main St.Hollander owns 184-186 Main St., a building reduced to rubble and a facade in a December 1997 blaze. The Historic Annapolis Foundation sought an injunction to bar Hollander from razing the facade, and that touched off an argument that shows no sign of ending.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff Writer | May 5, 1993
Some men go to Queenstown Park, police say, for more than a stroll along the pathways through the woods. More than two dozen routinely show up at the park around lunchtime seeking homosexual liaisons, investigators say.As part of a sting operation prompted by complaints from residents who live nearby or use the park on Queenstown Road, county police have charged four men since Friday with indecent exposure and fourth-degree sex offenses, Detective Kevin...
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.