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By Los Angeles Times | October 12, 1990
Films going into production:''Jungle Fever'' (40 Acres and a Mule Filmworks). Shooting in New York. Spike Lee's next concerns a black man from Harlem and his interracial love connection with an Italian-American from Brooklyn's Bensonhurst section. Wesley Snipes, Shadow in "Mo' Better Blues," stars alongside Annabella Sciorra. Also stars Lee, Lonette McKee, John Turturro, Samuel Jackson, Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee. Distributor is Universal.''Auntie Lee's Meat Pies (Steiner Films). Shooting in Los Angeles.
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By Ericka Blount Danois and Ericka Blount Danois,Special to The Sun | February 4, 2007
Preston "Bodie" Broadus wipes his hand down over his face and stands with his back facing the camera. In this scene from this past season's The Wire, the street-level drug dealer faces the future alone after the collapse of his drug enterprise and the murder of a friend. This moment, according to director Ernest Dickerson, represents a rite of passage for the character. His life in HBO's gritty crime series set in Baltimore is about to change. The camera zooms out slowly and opens the shot to show Bodie standing alone on the corner, facing rows of steps and abandoned homes.
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By Jan Tuckwood and Jan Tuckwood,Cox News Service | July 3, 1991
Flipper Purify, the adulterous architect in Spike Lee's "Jungle Fever," may be the best-dressed man on film this summer.He wears $600 Gianni Versace sweaters and $150 Isaac Mizrahi ties. He has a tiny earring in his left ear. And he makes the men on "thirty-something" look like fashion wimps.Those guys Michael, Elliot and Gary inspired a new line of clothing, also called "thirtysomething," which is supposed to be in stores for fall. But if men want to steal some really creative wardrobe ideas, they should check out Flipper, played by Wesley Snipes.
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By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 18, 2002
SANTA MONICA, Calif. - Samuel L. Jackson has felt road rage. Not in the 9-iron, tee-off-on-the-other-guy's-car way, a la Jack Nicholson. Or in the let's-duke-it-out fashion of Gene Hackman. Jackson, known for his jittery characters on-screen, said he sometimes honks or gives someone the finger. He'll even get out of his car and ask the other driver what he's so upset about. When the other driver recognizes Jackson, the confrontation is usually diffused. If only Jackson's character in Changing Lanes, which opened last week, could react with the same restraint.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | June 7, 1991
'Jungle Fever'Starring Wesley Snipes and Annabella Sciorra.Directed by Spike Lee.Released by Universal.Rated R.*** 1/22 Give this to Spike Lee: He sees everything.In his private life he may be a strident polemicist, a hustling millionaire gym shoe salesman and a loudmouthed whiner who blames everything on "the problem" -- racism -- but behind the camera he's an artist, with an artist's vision and compassion.In his new "Jungle Fever," he sees the pain and hope of interracial love, the despair of drugs, the stifling crunch of orthodoxy, the tragedy of broken communications.
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By Lou Cedrone | June 7, 1991
SPIKE LEE, whose ''Do the Right Thing'' was more wrong than right, and whose ''Mo' Better Blues'' was almost all wrong, shows tremendous improvement in his latest film, ''Jungle Fever.''There are some things wrong with the movie, but there are many more that are right. If Lee has been criticized for being incapable of writing about relationships, if he has been rapped for not being able to end a movie, he manages both situations in the new film.Actually, the new movie has two endings. The first seems arbitrary until Marvin Gaye comes to mind, and the second is just a little much.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | June 7, 1991
UNPLUGGED -- THE OFFICIAL BOOTLEGPaul McCartney (Capitol 96413)When Paul McCartney agreed to perform with his current band on MTV's acoustic-music show, "MTV Unplugged," he figured some fans might want a better copy than what their VCRs would offer. Hence "Unplugged -- the Official Bootleg," which includes all the false starts, bad jokes and muttered asides, plus some wonderfully offhand renditions of vintage rockers and Beatle classics. It would be worth hearing if only for "I Lost My Little Girl," which McCartney announces as "the first song I ever wrote," but "I've Just Seen a Face" isn't bad, either.
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By Los Angeles Daily News | June 26, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- "Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves" continues to slay all rivals as the most popular movie of the summer.The Kevin Costner action-adventure epic remained the hottest ticket at the nation's theaters for the second straight weekend. It made $18.3 million Friday, Saturday and Sunday -- a quite manageable, 30 percent drop from the opening weekend's $25 million gross.With an outstanding per-screen average of $7,720, "Robin Hood" is likely to hold on to the top spot at least until the July 3 opening of "Terminator 2."
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By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | July 11, 1991
Add the name of John Singleton to the growing list of young black men who are distinguishing themselves as film directors.The list includes Spike Lee (''Jungle Fever''), Mario Van Peebles (''New Jack City'') and Matty Rich (''Straight Out of Brooklyn'').Singleton, all of 23, wrote and directed ''Boyz N the Hood,'' a gritty, unrelenting melodrama that focuses on a group of young black men who live in South Central Los Angeles, where Singleton was raised.Singleton's mother and father never married, nor did they ever live together.
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By Los Angeles Daily News | April 18, 1992
Whoever had the bright idea of making a modern-day Marx Brothers movie should have kept this in mind: The Marx Brothers were funny.Once you get past its title, "Brain Donors" is anything but funny. Impudent and manic, yes, in the best Marxian tradition.But it is desperate in its scattered shots at any lame thing for a possible laugh, where the Marxes were always cool and -- for the most part -- surreally inspired when it came to stringing nonsense together.The film's nominal plot could have been subtitled "A Night at the Ballet."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2000
The air may be cool, the ground slick with ice, but from the moment you enter, there's no mistaking where you are: You're in the jungle. Bird calls slice through the rising mist. Vines tumble from overhead, falling from the thick foliage that obscures the view. But nothing blocks the scene's centerpiece: the "Tree of Life," a 7 1/2 -ton, 38-foot-tall, three-tiered mammoth planted firmly in the middle of the big room. And surrounding it all? Seats. Rows and rows of seats, because you're in the Baltimore Arena, and the show is about to begin.
NEWS
By Sandy Coleman and Sandy Coleman,BOSTON GLOBE | June 16, 1996
It's bold, pleasing and definitely hot. Latina makes its debut this month, hoping to do for Latina women what Essence did for African-American women when it came on the scene 26 years ago -- showing readers that beauty comes in all kinds of packages while providing culturally relevant articles."
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Daily News | April 18, 1992
Whoever had the bright idea of making a modern-day Marx Brothers movie should have kept this in mind: The Marx Brothers were funny.Once you get past its title, "Brain Donors" is anything but funny. Impudent and manic, yes, in the best Marxian tradition.But it is desperate in its scattered shots at any lame thing for a possible laugh, where the Marxes were always cool and -- for the most part -- surreally inspired when it came to stringing nonsense together.The film's nominal plot could have been subtitled "A Night at the Ballet."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Josh Mooney | January 17, 1992
JUNGLE FEVERMCA/Universal Home VideoNo retail price listedWesley Snipes and Annabella Sciorra, who play a black architect and a white secretary, respectively, fall for each other in this Spike Lee film -- and the pair are such good actors thatthey add depth and humanity to their characters, which are, typical of Mr. Lee, designed to be less than realistic.This is a powerful, but flawed, film. When fate has it that Flipper (Snipes) and Angie (Sciorra) meet and begin a torrid affair, all hell breaks loose.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | August 17, 1991
MOVIES'Doctor' becomes patientWilliam Hurt, delivering one of the best and most convincing performances of his career, plays a respected but indifferent San Francisco surgeon who learns what it is to be a patient in "The Doctor," a movie that walks a fine line between comedy and tragedy and makes it safely home. Christine Lahti is the doctor's steady, dependable wife, who helps him through the crisis, and Elizabeth Perkins is the young woman the doctor meets when he being treated for cancer of the throat.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | July 11, 1991
Add the name of John Singleton to the growing list of young black men who are distinguishing themselves as film directors.The list includes Spike Lee (''Jungle Fever''), Mario Van Peebles (''New Jack City'') and Matty Rich (''Straight Out of Brooklyn'').Singleton, all of 23, wrote and directed ''Boyz N the Hood,'' a gritty, unrelenting melodrama that focuses on a group of young black men who live in South Central Los Angeles, where Singleton was raised.Singleton's mother and father never married, nor did they ever live together.
NEWS
By Sandy Coleman and Sandy Coleman,BOSTON GLOBE | June 16, 1996
It's bold, pleasing and definitely hot. Latina makes its debut this month, hoping to do for Latina women what Essence did for African-American women when it came on the scene 26 years ago -- showing readers that beauty comes in all kinds of packages while providing culturally relevant articles."
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | August 17, 1991
MOVIES'Doctor' becomes patientWilliam Hurt, delivering one of the best and most convincing performances of his career, plays a respected but indifferent San Francisco surgeon who learns what it is to be a patient in "The Doctor," a movie that walks a fine line between comedy and tragedy and makes it safely home. Christine Lahti is the doctor's steady, dependable wife, who helps him through the crisis, and Elizabeth Perkins is the young woman the doctor meets when he being treated for cancer of the throat.
FEATURES
By Jan Tuckwood and Jan Tuckwood,Cox News Service | July 3, 1991
Flipper Purify, the adulterous architect in Spike Lee's "Jungle Fever," may be the best-dressed man on film this summer.He wears $600 Gianni Versace sweaters and $150 Isaac Mizrahi ties. He has a tiny earring in his left ear. And he makes the men on "thirty-something" look like fashion wimps.Those guys Michael, Elliot and Gary inspired a new line of clothing, also called "thirtysomething," which is supposed to be in stores for fall. But if men want to steal some really creative wardrobe ideas, they should check out Flipper, played by Wesley Snipes.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Daily News | June 26, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- "Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves" continues to slay all rivals as the most popular movie of the summer.The Kevin Costner action-adventure epic remained the hottest ticket at the nation's theaters for the second straight weekend. It made $18.3 million Friday, Saturday and Sunday -- a quite manageable, 30 percent drop from the opening weekend's $25 million gross.With an outstanding per-screen average of $7,720, "Robin Hood" is likely to hold on to the top spot at least until the July 3 opening of "Terminator 2."
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