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NEWS
March 18, 2012
There is something wrong with the U.S. We marvel at the increasing mental intelligence of people living in India and China, especially in the cyber field, and how they provide technical assistance to so many American companies. And we wonder, why? In the U.S., children grow up with denigrating terms as "geeks" or "nerds" to label such high-achievers while adulating stars on the athletic field who earn big bucks for performance on professional sports teams. There is nothing wrong with sports and the health benefits which accompany the activity.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2013
BROOKLYN, N.Y. - Maryland returned to the Barclays Center a year older and maybe a year wiser, but the Terps seemed to follow the same script against No. 18 Connecticut on Friday night that they did in a three-point loss to No. 3 Kentucky in last season's opener. Seemingly as nervous as they were against the Wildcats, the Terps fell behind early and by a lot - 12 at halftime, 17 early in the second half - before staging a furious comeback that, again, fell short. Junior point guard Dez Wells missed two shots in the closing seconds and Maryland lost, 78-77, before a pro-Terps crowd of 12,867.
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NEWS
February 18, 2001
The one-handed jump shot revolutionized basketball by creating more scoring, giving attacking players an element of surprise against even close defenders. The basics: * Stop, square your shoulders toward the basket and jump up, not out. * Support the ball with your nonshooting fingers. * Keep your shooting elbow in, next to your chest. * Eye your target, a spot just over the front of the rim. * Release with more of a flipping motion than pushing. * Follow through, the forefinger on your shooting hand being the last to touch the ball.
NEWS
March 18, 2012
There is something wrong with the U.S. We marvel at the increasing mental intelligence of people living in India and China, especially in the cyber field, and how they provide technical assistance to so many American companies. And we wonder, why? In the U.S., children grow up with denigrating terms as "geeks" or "nerds" to label such high-achievers while adulating stars on the athletic field who earn big bucks for performance on professional sports teams. There is nothing wrong with sports and the health benefits which accompany the activity.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | March 5, 1996
WASHINGTON -- What does a shooting guard do when his shot isn't falling?Kwame Evans is often called the best two guard in the Atlantic 10 Conference, but he's made 36.7 percent of his attempts in his last seven games, 16.7 from three-point range. Near the end of his career at George Washington, Evans isn't exactly knocking down the 20-footer, but he's leaving the Colonials with more than the sweet jumper he brought from Southern High.For the last two years, Evans has been implored to lead, and finally, there he was after GW spoiled Massachusetts' perfect season, calling a meeting and telling his teammates to keep their LTC heads straight.
SPORTS
By Ron Green and Ron Green,Charlotte Observer | May 7, 1993
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- There was a time, in the first few weeks of his employment with the Charlotte Hornets, when Alonzo Mourning's jump shot was not welcome.You know, that precious, gorgeous, wonderful, awesome, incredible jump shot that won the game Wednesday night, brought Charlotte leaping to its feet with a scream that cracked windows as far west as Albuquerque, beat the storied Boston Celtics and set the Hornets on their way to the second round of the NBA playoffs.The jump shot heard around the NBA was a warning shot that soon, maybe not this year but soon, the Charlotte Hornets will be more than the little darlings of the NBA playoffs, they'll be a major force.
SPORTS
By Stan Rappaport and Stan Rappaport,SUN STAFF | December 31, 1995
Jill Younce finally got the message: practice hard, or take a seat on the bench."I didn't take practice seriously," said Younce. "I goofed off a lot."A junior last season on Glenelg's basketball team, Younce played games with a passion that was matched only by her apathetic approach to practice."
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1996
INDIANAPOLIS - They kept watching Brian Tolbert and Eastern Michigan hit jump shot after jump shot. They kept seeing their deficit grow until it had reached 13 points.But the top-seeded Connecticut Huskies kept doing something else: They kept their cool."Coach said during the first couple of timeouts, 'They can't keep shooting like this,' " said senior guard Doron Sheffer. "After a while, they got tired and started missing their shots."And Sheffer started hitting his. As did All-America guard Ray Allen.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | November 27, 1998
BAYAMON, Puerto Rico -- Maryland has spent the first two weeks of the season passing up easy shots for easier ones. Starting today in the semifinals of the Puerto Rico Shootout, at least one Terp will have to stop being so unselfish and knock down the occasional jump shot.Laron Profit was voted a preseason all-star in the Atlantic Coast Conference. The senior wing forward got three steals in yesterday's romp over American University of Puerto Rico to become Maryland's No. 2 all-time in that category, but the more compelling statistic was his three-point percentage.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | June 17, 2009
Every year during the NBA playoffs, Don Ohl's eyes brighten, his step quickens and his heart beats a little faster - but not dangerously so for Ohl, 73, a survivor of six-way bypass surgery. The playoffs always brought out the best in the one-time star of the Baltimore Bullets. More than 40 years later, the man nicknamed "Waxie" for his crew cut still holds the Washington Wizards' franchise record for highest postseason scoring average. In 13 playoff games for Baltimore in 1965 and 1966, Ohl averaged 26.2 points, stellar work for a 6-foot-3 guard who practically carried those upstart Bullets on his back at crunch time.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | June 17, 2009
Every year during the NBA playoffs, Don Ohl's eyes brighten, his step quickens and his heart beats a little faster - but not dangerously so for Ohl, 73, a survivor of six-way bypass surgery. The playoffs always brought out the best in the one-time star of the Baltimore Bullets. More than 40 years later, the man nicknamed "Waxie" for his crew cut still holds the Washington Wizards' franchise record for highest postseason scoring average. In 13 playoff games for Baltimore in 1965 and 1966, Ohl averaged 26.2 points, stellar work for a 6-foot-3 guard who practically carried those upstart Bullets on his back at crunch time.
NEWS
March 22, 2006
PLAYER OF THE YEAR Marah Strickland Towson Catholic The gifted junior transferred from St. John's at Prospect Hall and promptly led the Owls to the Interscholastic Athletic Association of Maryland A Conference regular-season championship - their best finish in 21 years. A 6-foot guard with an impressive jump shot, Strickland averaged 23.2 points and shot 40.2 percent from three-point range in leading the No. 4 Owls to a 22-5 season against the area's toughest schedule. A Street & Smith's honorable mention All-American in 2004 and 2005, she was rated one of the nation's top 10 sophomore guards last season by USA Today.
SPORTS
By JOE GERGEN and JOE GERGEN,NEWSDAY | March 18, 2006
The final score didn't do justice to Albany's effort. Nor did it suggest how deep the second-ranked team in the country had to dig in rallying for a 72-59 victory in a first-round game of the NCAA tournament last night in Philadelphia. Connecticut's goal of a third national championship remains alive - but before they could advance, the Huskies had to pass a stress test. All they had accomplished this season, including the co-championship of the Big East, appeared to be in vain when unheralded Albany, making its first postseason appearance as a Division I program, surged to a 50-38 lead with 11:34 left on Jamar Wilson's pull-up jumper in the lane.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2005
Chandrea Jones has so many offensive tricks in her basketball repertoire that one opposing coach joked that he might play a box-and-one on the Institute of Notre Dame senior this season. That's the box on Jones and the one on everybody else. Since she rolled up 31 points against Bullis Prep in her freshman debut, Jones has been one of the area's most prolific scorers. A three-time first-team All-Metro pick and last season's Baltimore City/County Player of the Year, Jones scored her 2,000th career point in Friday night's 58-44 victory over Notre Dame Prep.
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2005
Brian Johnson's pull-up jumper in the lane with 2.8 seconds remaining lifted top-ranked Mount St. Joseph over No. 9 Archbishop Spalding, 52-50, last night before a packed house in Irvington. "Big-time players step up and make big-time plays, and I told Coach I was going to take the last shot and I knocked it down," Johnson said. It was the Mount's seventh consecutive win over Spalding since losing to the Cavaliers, 61-54, in the Baltimore Catholic League tournament semifinals in February 2002.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2004
To keep up with LeBron James - former star of Akron's St. Vincent-St. Mary High School, last year's No. 1 pick of the NBA draft, beneficiary of a $90 million endorsement contract and Rookie of the Year with the Cleveland Cavaliers - doesn't exactly require a search party. His fame might explain the unprecedented rush of high school talent going pro, with the league receiving notice of plans to enter next month's NBA draft from 13 players. To keep up with James Lang - the fifth and last player the league drafted out of high school - is a challenge in his current job with the Oklahoma Storm of the United States Basketball League.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2001
Pro basketball hasn't been the same since he left. It has become the province of erratic and overpaid 19-year-olds, spoiled turnover machines who can't shoot, can't play defense, can't get along with teammates and coaches. Or maybe it just seems that way because he's gone, leaving a gap no one could possibly fill. With a lament like that we could only be talking about Michael Jordan, which may explain why "Michael Jordan to the Max" has been a box-office hit at IMAX theaters around the country.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2002
WASHINGTON - Watch out, basketball world. Michael Jordan is starting to feel a rhythm. With two straight 40-point-plus performances, Jordan is in mid-career form and is carrying the Washington Wizards with him, as evidenced by last night's 112-102 victory over the Phoenix Suns at MCI Center. Jordan torched the Suns for 41 points - two nights after busting the Cleveland Cavaliers for 40 - and declared that he is in sync and in his best form since coming back after three years of retirement.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2003
GAINESVILLE, Fla. -- They watched a huge lead melt away, only to find themselves trying to survive in yet another overtime contest. Their starting point guard fouled out just before the extra period arrived. They nearly buckled under the pressure that comes with playing in the so-called House of Horrors against the nation's No. 1 team. Still, the Maryland Terrapins would not quit against the Florida Gators last night. The Terps dug down and did just enough to reverse their recent course and inject new spark into an unpredictable season.
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