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Julius Caesar

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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | December 10, 1993
Remember the old Certs commercial: "It's two, two, two mints in one"? At Washington's Shakespeare Theatre, director Joe Dowling has mounted the Certs of "Julius Caesar" productions. But in this case, the duality isn't an asset, it's a distraction.The production is set in an unspecificed modern time, with costumes that initially suggest an Eastern European, or perhaps South American, country on the verge of revolution. Most of the men wear large, double-breasted suits, and, in a nod to the play's classical story, the leaders also wear loosely draped white robes as an outer covering.
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By Tim Smith | October 27, 2009
You've got to admire the mix of imagination and chutzpah behind the Chesapeake Shakespeare Company, which last year tried out the concept of an outdoor production that includes nearly as much action on the part of the audience as the cast. That first "Movable Shakespeare" venture, "Macbeth," has been followed this season by a "Julius Caesar" that spreads all over the cool ruins of Ellicott City's historic Patapsco Female Institute, where "the deep of night is crept upon [their] talk." On Friday, the seep of rain crept in, too - poured in, even, as the last scenes were played on a grassy knoll.
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NEWS
By Russell Baker | November 21, 1991
THE LACK of public excitement about the recent discovery that Julius Caesar was completely bald says a great deal about the decline of American education. Fifty or even 40 years ago this remarkable news would have spawned a thousand jokes from schoolchildren struggling with Caesar's history of the Gallic wars and graybeards equally at home with the Odes of Horace and the cut throat world of Wall Street.In those days many Americans would have been inspired by the startling news of Caesar's baldness to compose an ode in the style of Horace, such was the popular command of Latin and Roman history created by American educators' determination to create a love for the classics.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | February 27, 2008
Thanks to Julius Caesar, we have leap year. Back in 45 B.C., he established it as part of his Julian calendar. In 1582, Pope Gregory XII fine-tuned it. In tribute to the leap year and the extra day of February it brings us this week, I ate Caesar salads. The original salad - a mixture of romaine lettuce, croutons, garlic, parmesan, a few drops of Worcestershire, olive oil, lemon juice and a raw egg - is said to be the creation of another guy named Caesar. That would be Caesar Cardini, a restaurateur who lived in San Diego and operated a hotel in Tijuana, Mexico, and claimed to create the dish in the 1920s.
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 15, 2006
The latest proof of the timelessness of Shakespeare comes in the form of Julius X, a world premiere play at the Theatre Project. By grafting the plot and some of the text of Julius Caesar together with the story of Malcolm X's murder, playwright Al Letson Jr. offers a classic - and classical - demonstration not only of Shakespeare's infinite adaptability, but also, thematically, of how allies can become assassins and how the struggle for power can turn...
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 14, 2004
The start of the Baltimore Shakespeare Festival's production of Julius Caesar is more exciting than both political conventions and all the debates combined. OK. Maybe that's not saying much. But when a throng of commoners briskly enters through the back of the theater, carrying one of their number on their shoulders and chanting "Caesar! Caesar! Caesar!" it's difficult not to get caught up in the moment. And when two threatening-looking black-garbed tribunes chase them off stage, the feeling that all is not well in the republic is palpable.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | February 27, 2008
Thanks to Julius Caesar, we have leap year. Back in 45 B.C., he established it as part of his Julian calendar. In 1582, Pope Gregory XII fine-tuned it. In tribute to the leap year and the extra day of February it brings us this week, I ate Caesar salads. The original salad - a mixture of romaine lettuce, croutons, garlic, parmesan, a few drops of Worcestershire, olive oil, lemon juice and a raw egg - is said to be the creation of another guy named Caesar. That would be Caesar Cardini, a restaurateur who lived in San Diego and operated a hotel in Tijuana, Mexico, and claimed to create the dish in the 1920s.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Reporter | December 17, 2006
Augustus - The Life of Rome's First Emperor Anthony Everitt Random House / 368 pages / $26.95 Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus, known to history as Augustus, set a dangerous and appealing example. He killed his enemies, completed the usurpation of the Roman Republic, set himself up as de facto monarch and launched the Western world into two centuries of peace and prosperity. How many tears might have been avoided had he failed we'll never know. As it is, his Pax Romana (Roman Peace) glows like a candle for any politician who believes that autocracy and aggressive war will end all war. Charlemagne named himself Augustus.
FEATURES
By James Giza and James Giza,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2001
One by one, in a slow-motion procession to the beat of a drum, the conspirators plunge their invisible knives into the body of Julius Caesar. It is early in the production week for the Shakespeare Summer Camp at Goucher College, and the players -- 40 Baltimore area youths ages 7 to 19 -- are rehearsing the climax of the Bard's tale of jealousy, betrayal and justice. As Brutus prepares to stab the man he fears has become an overly ambitious tyrant, the two sides of his conscience suddenly appear on stage and launch into an impassioned debate.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 5, 1997
They ruled over one of history's most magnificent civilizations, overseeing an age that stretched from just before the birth of Christ to the rise of Byzantium and beyond. Their names have been incorporated into the vocabulary as months of the year, rulers of Russia, even ways of giving birth. Some were great, others notorious. All were fascinating.Beginning tonight, A&E's "Biography" departs from its usual roster of 20th-century names to dip back a couple of millenniums and look at the men who led the Roman Empire, rulers whose deeds have become legends known to every schoolchild.
FEATURES
By Dennis McLellan and Dennis McLellan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 19, 2007
Deborah Kerr, the acclaimed British actress whose versatile talent and refined screen persona made her one of Hollywood's top leading ladies in the 1950s in films such as From Here to Eternity, The King and I and An Affair to Remember, has died. She was 86. Ms. Kerr, who in recent years had Parkinson's disease, died Tuesday in Suffolk, eastern England, her agent said yesterday. In a screen career that was launched in the early 1940s, Ms. Kerr received six best actress Academy Award nominations.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Reporter | December 17, 2006
Augustus - The Life of Rome's First Emperor Anthony Everitt Random House / 368 pages / $26.95 Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus, known to history as Augustus, set a dangerous and appealing example. He killed his enemies, completed the usurpation of the Roman Republic, set himself up as de facto monarch and launched the Western world into two centuries of peace and prosperity. How many tears might have been avoided had he failed we'll never know. As it is, his Pax Romana (Roman Peace) glows like a candle for any politician who believes that autocracy and aggressive war will end all war. Charlemagne named himself Augustus.
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 15, 2006
The latest proof of the timelessness of Shakespeare comes in the form of Julius X, a world premiere play at the Theatre Project. By grafting the plot and some of the text of Julius Caesar together with the story of Malcolm X's murder, playwright Al Letson Jr. offers a classic - and classical - demonstration not only of Shakespeare's infinite adaptability, but also, thematically, of how allies can become assassins and how the struggle for power can turn...
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 11, 2005
Monty Python's Spamalot, a madcap musical based on the 1975 movie Monty Python and the Holy Grail, came a step closer to finding the grail when it racked up a whopping 14 Tony Award nominations in New York yesterday. Capping one of the strongest seasons for new musicals in recent years, the Arthurian spoof will compete against two shows with 11 nominations each - Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, adapted from the 1988 movie about a couple of con men on the Riviera, and The Light in the Piazza, a musical with a score by Richard Rodgers' grandson, Adam Guettel, about an American mother and her mentally challenged grown daughter, who finds romance on an Italian vacation.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 14, 2004
The start of the Baltimore Shakespeare Festival's production of Julius Caesar is more exciting than both political conventions and all the debates combined. OK. Maybe that's not saying much. But when a throng of commoners briskly enters through the back of the theater, carrying one of their number on their shoulders and chanting "Caesar! Caesar! Caesar!" it's difficult not to get caught up in the moment. And when two threatening-looking black-garbed tribunes chase them off stage, the feeling that all is not well in the republic is palpable.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 7, 2004
Think you know who wrote Hamlet, Macbeth and Romeo and Juliet? Think again. In certain scholarly circles, the identity of the author of these and the other 30-plus plays and sonnets in the Shakespeare canon is open to question. Cases have been made for writers including Francis Bacon, Christopher Marlowe and Edward de Vere, the 17th Earl of Oxford. Beginning today and continuing through the weekend, the Shakespeare Fellowship - whose members support the Earl of Oxford theory - will hold its third annual conference in Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith | October 27, 2009
You've got to admire the mix of imagination and chutzpah behind the Chesapeake Shakespeare Company, which last year tried out the concept of an outdoor production that includes nearly as much action on the part of the audience as the cast. That first "Movable Shakespeare" venture, "Macbeth," has been followed this season by a "Julius Caesar" that spreads all over the cool ruins of Ellicott City's historic Patapsco Female Institute, where "the deep of night is crept upon [their] talk." On Friday, the seep of rain crept in, too - poured in, even, as the last scenes were played on a grassy knoll.
TOPIC
By John E. McIntyre | January 2, 2000
YOU PROBABLY thought this morning, as you finally shook off the effects of the champagne or crouched among your canned goods, that you were finally done with the millennium. But, as Yogi Berra pointedly observed, "it ain't over till it's over." Even though many newspapers, including this one, have repeatedly run articles about the start of the millennium -- and The Sun even had one of those digital clocks in the lobby ticking off the seconds until the great event -- the 20th century and the second millennium A.D. still have 12 months to run. How, you wonder sourly, have we come to this?
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | November 9, 2003
What do hunters and Brutus have in common? Both have been accused of inflicting the "most unkindest cut of all." Brutus came by his reputation honestly after his famous dustup with Julius Caesar (Shakespeare, Act 3, Scene 2). Deer hunters -- not all, mind you -- innocently earn theirs at chow time, as diners gnaw the main course into submission. Watching someone who knows how to turn a deer into delicious roasts and steaks is a humbling experience, much like watching a master decoy carver.
FEATURES
By James Giza and James Giza,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2001
One by one, in a slow-motion procession to the beat of a drum, the conspirators plunge their invisible knives into the body of Julius Caesar. It is early in the production week for the Shakespeare Summer Camp at Goucher College, and the players -- 40 Baltimore area youths ages 7 to 19 -- are rehearsing the climax of the Bard's tale of jealousy, betrayal and justice. As Brutus prepares to stab the man he fears has become an overly ambitious tyrant, the two sides of his conscience suddenly appear on stage and launch into an impassioned debate.
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