Advertisement
HomeCollectionsJulie Taymor
IN THE NEWS

Julie Taymor

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 6, 2000
NEW YORK -- The large room is surprisingly empty. There's not a disembodied head in sight. And yet this pristine space, with its generous skylights, gleaming hardwood floors and bright white walls, is Julie Taymor's studio. This is the place where her imagination runs wild, where she concocts the kind of chilling imagery seen in, "Titus," her new film adaptation of the play often described as Shakespeare's bloodiest. "Maybe that's what draws me to Shakespeare -- that full range of imagery," Taymor says.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2010
Conviction, passion and creativity crackle and swing with a jazzy euphoria when you talk to Julie Taymor about art, whether the tragicomedy of the Bard or the myth-making of Marvel Comics. The director who brought experimental techniques to the Great White Way with "The Lion King" returns to screen and stage this winter with a rare aesthetic one-two combination. Taymor has unveiled a lyrical, thrilllingly lucid film of Shakespeare's "The Tempest," starring Helen Mirren, while completing the hugely ambitious and elaborate Broadway musical, " Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark," which boasts a score by Bono and the Edge.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and By Mary Carole McCauley,Sun Staff | November 10, 2002
WASHINGTON, D.C. -- It didn't occur to director Julie Taymor at first, all the ways in which her life is similar to that of Mexican artist Frida Kahlo's. "No," she says, shaking her head. "I didn't think about those things when I was making this film." There were so many other technical and aesthetic problems to think about instead, such as how to rescue Kahlo from the feminist view of her as a victim overshadowed by a powerful older man ("Of course she suffered, but she also had a lusty life," Taymor says.
NEWS
By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | February 25, 2009
Clooney urges Obama to do more for Darfur George Clooney missed Sunday's Oscars for more pressing business: To meet Monday morning with President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden to impress on them the need for a full-time regional envoy to Sudan to address the crisis in Darfur. Clooney explained his Oscar absence Monday on CNN's Larry King Live. Clooney told Obama the 250,000 refugees in camps in Chad need "what we do best ... good, robust diplomacy all across the world." Fighting erupted in Darfur in 2003.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 28, 2007
Across the Universe is disarming, discombobulating and disappointing. Director Julie Taymor has torn page after page from the Beatles' songbook and used it to assemble an allusive pop history of the 1960s. At the film's core is a love story that encompasses the Fab Four's Liverpool, England, roots, American flower power and the increasing despair and division of the Vietnam era. But contrivance overpowers inspiration. With characters named after Beatles titles and echoes of McCartney-Lennon and George Harrison lyrics peppered into the setups and dialogue, the movie is like a fresco done in prefab slabs.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 4, 2005
Mirrormask is a gorgeous psychedelic cameo of a movie. It's about a 15-year-old girl with an unusual young-adult-fiction problem. Her parents run an old-fashioned family circus and are also madly in love. Their ecstasy causes this artistic teenager, not yet her own self and not yet a woman, to feel left out and batty. Early on, cancer sends her mom to the hospital. As her father struggles to keep his troupe together, Helena (Stephanie Leonidas) wakes up in a wispy yet volatile dream landscape.
NEWS
By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | February 25, 2009
Clooney urges Obama to do more for Darfur George Clooney missed Sunday's Oscars for more pressing business: To meet Monday morning with President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden to impress on them the need for a full-time regional envoy to Sudan to address the crisis in Darfur. Clooney explained his Oscar absence Monday on CNN's Larry King Live. Clooney told Obama the 250,000 refugees in camps in Chad need "what we do best ... good, robust diplomacy all across the world." Fighting erupted in Darfur in 2003.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2010
Conviction, passion and creativity crackle and swing with a jazzy euphoria when you talk to Julie Taymor about art, whether the tragicomedy of the Bard or the myth-making of Marvel Comics. The director who brought experimental techniques to the Great White Way with "The Lion King" returns to screen and stage this winter with a rare aesthetic one-two combination. Taymor has unveiled a lyrical, thrilllingly lucid film of Shakespeare's "The Tempest," starring Helen Mirren, while completing the hugely ambitious and elaborate Broadway musical, " Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark," which boasts a score by Bono and the Edge.
FEATURES
September 21, 2007
ACROSS THE UNIVERSE -- (Columbia) Beatles tunes are the backdrop for a musical romance between young lovers (Evan Rachel Wood and Jim Sturgess). Julie Taymor directs. DEEP WATER -- (IFC) Documentary examines a disastrous 1968 around-the-world yacht race. THE FEAST OF LOVE -- (MGM) Morgan Freeman, Greg Kinnear and Radha Mitchell lead the cast in director Robert Benton's ensemble romance. THE GAME PLAN -- (Disney) Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson is a quarterback forced to take in a daughter he never knew he had. THE KINGDOM -- (Universal)
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 29, 2005
It may have started out as a cartoon, but it's coming in on giant cats' paws and not with a whimper, but a roar. When The Lion King begins its 14-week run at the Hippodrome Theatre on Thursday, it will launch the longest engagement of any touring show in Baltimore history. And though we've been inundated over the years with Lion King books, CDs, stuffed animals, T-shirts, watches, snow globes and baseball caps, there's still plenty of magic in the show's mid-Atlantic premiere. Adapted from Disney's 1994 animated film, the Tony Award-winning musical tells the story of Simba, the cub who flees the kingdom of the Pridelands after his father's death.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 28, 2007
Across the Universe is disarming, discombobulating and disappointing. Director Julie Taymor has torn page after page from the Beatles' songbook and used it to assemble an allusive pop history of the 1960s. At the film's core is a love story that encompasses the Fab Four's Liverpool, England, roots, American flower power and the increasing despair and division of the Vietnam era. But contrivance overpowers inspiration. With characters named after Beatles titles and echoes of McCartney-Lennon and George Harrison lyrics peppered into the setups and dialogue, the movie is like a fresco done in prefab slabs.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 4, 2005
Mirrormask is a gorgeous psychedelic cameo of a movie. It's about a 15-year-old girl with an unusual young-adult-fiction problem. Her parents run an old-fashioned family circus and are also madly in love. Their ecstasy causes this artistic teenager, not yet her own self and not yet a woman, to feel left out and batty. Early on, cancer sends her mom to the hospital. As her father struggles to keep his troupe together, Helena (Stephanie Leonidas) wakes up in a wispy yet volatile dream landscape.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and By Mary Carole McCauley,Sun Staff | November 10, 2002
WASHINGTON, D.C. -- It didn't occur to director Julie Taymor at first, all the ways in which her life is similar to that of Mexican artist Frida Kahlo's. "No," she says, shaking her head. "I didn't think about those things when I was making this film." There were so many other technical and aesthetic problems to think about instead, such as how to rescue Kahlo from the feminist view of her as a victim overshadowed by a powerful older man ("Of course she suffered, but she also had a lusty life," Taymor says.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 6, 2000
NEW YORK -- The large room is surprisingly empty. There's not a disembodied head in sight. And yet this pristine space, with its generous skylights, gleaming hardwood floors and bright white walls, is Julie Taymor's studio. This is the place where her imagination runs wild, where she concocts the kind of chilling imagery seen in, "Titus," her new film adaptation of the play often described as Shakespeare's bloodiest. "Maybe that's what draws me to Shakespeare -- that full range of imagery," Taymor says.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 8, 2002
Frida, the film biography of Mexican painter Frida Kahlo, is hopelessly at odds with itself and not in very fascinating ways. At its infrequent best, the movie reflects the artist's lacerating self-portraits. We see the actors literally forming the basis of her paintings or stepping out of them; splashes of collage or puppetry bridge gaps in the action and reflect her surreal temperament. In these flurries of invention, dramatic life imitates a graphic art that has already imitated real life.
FEATURES
September 17, 2007
LOS ANGELES -- The Jodie Foster vigilante flick The Brave One scared up $14 million at the box office to become the weekend's top film. The Warner Bros. tale of revenge transcended gender, appealing to older women as well as men who might naturally be expected to enjoy the violent, R-rated film. "Revenge movies often appeal to men, but the fact that Jodie Foster was in it brought in the women," said Paul Dergarabedian, president of box-office tracker Media By Numbers. "That combination worked."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.