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By Lou Cedrone | February 26, 1991
The one-woman show can be as entertaining as a full-blown production. Frequently, it is much more than expected. Two of the best examples of this theatrical form were Cloris Leachman's impersonation of Grandma Moses and Barbara Rush's ''A Woman of Independent Means.''Add to these ''Lucifer's Child,'' currently playing at the Kennedy Center in Washington. The solo performer in this instance is Julie Harris, who is impersonating Isak Dinesen, the Danish woman who, in 1913, at the age of 28, moved to Mombasa, Africa, where she married her cousin, Baron Bror von Blixen-Finecke.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 20, 1998
D.L. Coburn's bittersweet Pulitzer Prize-winning play, "The Gin Game," is a drama about the basic interplay between a man and a woman. If the main characters were a few decades younger, instead of being senior citizens in a nursing home, the central plot device might be a sexual tango, not a card game.But Fonsia Dorsey and Weller Martin are up in years and down at heel. The dozen or so hands of gin they play on the nursing home's dilapidated sun porch -- conveyed with ramshackle realism by set designer James Noone -- are their sole diversion and, as it turns out, their sole means of communication.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 20, 1998
D.L. Coburn's bittersweet Pulitzer Prize-winning play, "The Gin Game," is a drama about the basic interplay between a man and a woman. If the main characters were a few decades younger, instead of being senior citizens in a nursing home, the central plot device might be a sexual tango, not a card game.But Fonsia Dorsey and Weller Martin are up in years and down at heel. The dozen or so hands of gin they play on the nursing home's dilapidated sun porch -- conveyed with ramshackle realism by set designer James Noone -- are their sole diversion and, as it turns out, their sole means of communication.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 16, 1998
When D.L. Coburn's 1978 Pulitzer Prize-winning play, "The Gin Game," opens at the Mechanic Theatre tomorrow, actors Charles Durning and Julie Harris will actually be playing gin on stage -- more than a dozen games.Baltimore-born Coburn, who describes himself as the "gin choreographer," explains that the actors have a bit of an edge -- they play with a stacked deck. "You can still play gin with a stacked deck, it just gets easier," he says.The published script lays out the make-up of the stacked deck: four aces, four twos, two sixes, five sevens, five eights, six nines, six tens and 20 face cards.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 16, 1998
When D.L. Coburn's 1978 Pulitzer Prize-winning play, "The Gin Game," opens at the Mechanic Theatre tomorrow, actors Charles Durning and Julie Harris will actually be playing gin on stage -- more than a dozen games.Baltimore-born Coburn, who describes himself as the "gin choreographer," explains that the actors have a bit of an edge -- they play with a stacked deck. "You can still play gin with a stacked deck, it just gets easier," he says.The published script lays out the make-up of the stacked deck: four aces, four twos, two sixes, five sevens, five eights, six nines, six tens and 20 face cards.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 15, 1998
D.L. Coburn used to be one nasty card player. Consider the time he was playing gin with a friend on a business trip in Cuernavaca, Mexico."This guy was beating the pants off of me. I couldn't believe it. I couldn't win no matter what I did. It was getting infuriating. It was getting late at night, but I had to keep him at that table," Coburn says, with just a hint of wicked delight in his voice."I looked up and saw the chandelier beginning to shake. I immediately knew we were getting tremors there, but I didn't say anything until he started to notice it, and I said, 'Shut up, Frank.
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By Los Angeles Times | December 6, 1990
Films going into production:''The Dark Half'' (Dark Half Productions). Shooting in Pittsburgh. Horror maven George Romero is executive producer, screenwriter and director of this chiller starring Tim Hutton, Amy Madigan, Michael Rooker and Julie Harris. Hutton plays an author whose life, along with his murderous subjects, is shown in detail.''Soapdish'' (Paramount). Shooting in New York. Sally Field, Kevin Kline, Whoopi Goldberg, Robert Downey Jr. and Elisabeth Shue all star in this look at a soap star (Field)
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By TANIKA WHITE and TANIKA WHITE,SUN REPORTER | January 4, 2006
It was 1966, all peace signs and Beatles, 5-cent postage stamps and What's it all about, Alfie? Stokely Carmichael was elected president of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, The Sound of Music won the Oscar for best picture and the first-ever episode of Star Trek aired. It was cool, man. On Baltimore's funky Read Street, a little shop had just opened, first selling handmade jewelry, then slowly adding the latest youthful fashions. The Bead Experience was an off-the-cuff venture by sisters Idy and Anne Bashoff, who -- with a shop full of bell-bottom pants, Nehru jackets and platform shoes -- single-handedly ushered in the local hippie-fashion revolution.
NEWS
May 29, 2007
CHARLES NELSON REILLY, 76 Actor, comedian Charles Nelson Reilly, the Tony Award winner who later became known for his ribald appearances on The Tonight Show and various game shows, died of complications from pneumonia Friday in Los Angeles. Mr. Reilly began his career in New York City, appearing on Broadway in 1962 as Bud Frump in the original Broadway production of How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying. The role won Mr. Reilly a Tony Award. He was nominated for a Tony again for playing Cornelius in Hello, Dolly!
NEWS
May 15, 1991
Bernard Ozer, a merchandiser at Associated Merchandising Corp. who turned low-budget clothing into fashion trends, died Sunday in New York of heart disease at age 60. Mr. Ozer was credited with discovering plastic sandals that became "jellies" on beaches in Yugoslavia and with popularizing the bicycle shorts of New York City bicycle messengers.Harry Slochower, who lost his teaching job in German and comparative literature at Brooklyn College in 1952 after refusing to tell a congressional committee whether he had been a Communist Party member, died Saturday at age 90. In 1956 he was reinstated when the Supreme Court ruled he had been denied due process.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 15, 1998
D.L. Coburn used to be one nasty card player. Consider the time he was playing gin with a friend on a business trip in Cuernavaca, Mexico."This guy was beating the pants off of me. I couldn't believe it. I couldn't win no matter what I did. It was getting infuriating. It was getting late at night, but I had to keep him at that table," Coburn says, with just a hint of wicked delight in his voice."I looked up and saw the chandelier beginning to shake. I immediately knew we were getting tremors there, but I didn't say anything until he started to notice it, and I said, 'Shut up, Frank.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | February 26, 1991
The one-woman show can be as entertaining as a full-blown production. Frequently, it is much more than expected. Two of the best examples of this theatrical form were Cloris Leachman's impersonation of Grandma Moses and Barbara Rush's ''A Woman of Independent Means.''Add to these ''Lucifer's Child,'' currently playing at the Kennedy Center in Washington. The solo performer in this instance is Julie Harris, who is impersonating Isak Dinesen, the Danish woman who, in 1913, at the age of 28, moved to Mombasa, Africa, where she married her cousin, Baron Bror von Blixen-Finecke.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | December 28, 1990
Films going into production:''The Dark Half,'' shooting in Pittsburgh. Horror maven George Romero exec produces, writes and directs this chiller starring Tim Hutton, Amy Madigan, Michael Rooker and Julie Harris. Hutton plays an author whose life, along with his murderous subjects, is shown in detail."The Linguini Incident," shooting in New York and Los Angeles. Rosanna Arquette heads an eccentric cast (David Bowie, Marlee Matlin and Shelley Winters) in an equally quirky scenario. Arquette is a waitress, with aspirations as an escape artist, who deals with life, stress and unusual characters in the big city.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2005
NOW OR NEVER Fells Point celebrates Mardi Gras on Tuesday. Starting at 6 p.m., a parade will wind around the area, ending in the central square. Expect stilt walkers, fire blowers, bands and more. The event culminates in a costume contest. Beware - the winner gets pushed out of an airplane as part of a tandem parachute jump. All are welcome to march in the parade. The parade starts at One Eyed Mike's at 701 Bond St. About a dozen area bars will participate and host various live music that night.
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