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By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | May 19, 1992
A salmon pink rose has been named after Julie Andrews, who portrayed the flower seller Eliza Doolittle in the original stage production of "My Fair Lady."Ms. Andrews said yesterday she was "ever so flattered" to be honored at the Chelsea Flower Show in London, which opens today sponsored by the Royal Horticultural Society.Ms. Andrews, who attended a preview of the show, said $1.80 from each "Julie Andrews" rose sold will be given to the Julie Andrews Appeal to fight arterial disease.The show marks the beginning of the British social season.
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By Betsy Sharkey and Betsy Sharkey,Tribune Newspapers | January 15, 2010
Up in the Air . . ( 4 STARS) The great surprise of this film starring George Clooney as a traveling corporate hatchet man, is that it manages to humanize both sides of those who sit at the terrible table where layoffs are doled out. It would have been easy for director Jason Reitman to let the newly unemployed drift into melodrama; he didn't. It would have been easier still to vilify, at least a little, Clooney's bad-news bear; he doesn't. Instead, Reitman gives us the perfect movie for our times, with a near-perfect Clooney the cherry on top. "Up in the Air" turns out to be the quintessential upper.
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By Peter Marks and Peter Marks,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 2, 1996
Julie Andrews says that giving up the Tony nomination for her performance in "Victor/Victoria" was easy. It's doing "Victor/Victoria" that's hard.You try a dozen costume changes from woman to man to woman to man, sing a G flat powerfully enough to create the impression of shattering glass, run from one end of a stage to the other while three assistants wait in the wings with throat sprays and water bottles laced with Gatorade and dance the tango with Rachel...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey | January 20, 2005
Where: The Hollywood Ballroom at 2126 Industrial Parkway in Silver Spring. When: 7:30 p.m. Wednesday Why: For anyone who has seen Julie Andrews (Maria) and Christopher Plummer (Captain von Trapp) waltz in The Sound of Music, this is an obvious date choice. The Hollywood Ballroom gives a one-hour Viennese waltz lesson that is followed by open dance time in a 7,200-square- foot hall. Plenty of time to sweep somebody off his or her feet. Alternatively, if you haven't seen the movie, a cozy night at home watching it could be in order.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 27, 1999
If you see only one made-for-TV holiday movie this year, make it "One Special Night," with Julie Andrews and James Garner.In fact, even if you hate holiday movies, see "One Special Night," tomorrow night at 9 on CBS. I haven't seen a pair of actors work this wonderfully together since Albert Finney and Tom Courtenay in "A Rather English Marriage" earlier this year on PBS' Masterpiece Theatre.Andrews plays Dr. Catherine Howard, a pediatric heart surgeon who drives a vintage Jaguar sports car and power walks to Mozart's Fifth Symphony.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey | January 20, 2005
Where: The Hollywood Ballroom at 2126 Industrial Parkway in Silver Spring. When: 7:30 p.m. Wednesday Why: For anyone who has seen Julie Andrews (Maria) and Christopher Plummer (Captain von Trapp) waltz in The Sound of Music, this is an obvious date choice. The Hollywood Ballroom gives a one-hour Viennese waltz lesson that is followed by open dance time in a 7,200-square- foot hall. Plenty of time to sweep somebody off his or her feet. Alternatively, if you haven't seen the movie, a cozy night at home watching it could be in order.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,SUN STAFF | October 25, 1995
Fascinating females dominate the lineup tonight, with Julie Andrews performing in a pledge-raising Broadway special on PBS and Sharon Gless and Tyne Daly back for another "Cagney & Lacey" film.* "Great Performances -- Julie Andrews: Back on Broadway" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., MPT, Channels 22, 67) -- A PBS "mini-pledge drive" accompanies the broadcast of this special, with live begging breaks from the Broadway studio where Ms. Andrews is currently performing "Victor/Victoria." (As part of its mini-pledge drive, MPT will also re-screen Part 1 of its recent documentary series "Gone But Not Forgotten," at 10 p.m.)
NEWS
March 12, 1996
Ross Hunter, producer of tear-jerker films of the '50s who later brought the action-disaster epic "Airport" to screens in the '70s, died Sunday in Los Angeles. His age was reported between 69 and 79.He went from a B-movie actor to a producer with a 25-year career at Universal, Columbia and Paramount studios. His more than 60 films were either bright confections -- starring Doris Day, Debbie Reynolds or Julie Andrews -- or sobbing remakes of films such as "Imitation of Life.""Airport" earned him his only Oscar nomination.
FEATURES
By Kevin Thomas and Kevin Thomas,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 11, 2004
Princess Diaries 2: Royal Engagement marks a return to Ruritania that arrives just in time to delight adolescent girls - and perhaps their mothers and grandmothers as well - before summer vacation is over. Like its predecessor, it's Hollywood hokum at its most glamorous and effective. Sequels are always tricky, especially when they're pure make-believe, but old pro director Garry Marshall understands that unabashed fairy tales require solid acting to make them believable. Julie Andrews returns, eternally radiant as Queen Clarisse Renaldi of the tiny principality of Genovia, as does Anne Hathaway as her granddaughter and heir to the throne, Princess Mia. Andrews fans are treated to a surprise: some years after throat surgery rendered her unable to sing she is again easily able to duet with the singer Raven, cast as a pal of Mia's, in the rousing "Your Crowning Glory."
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | April 27, 1996
Before launching her vast family, Barbara Tremitiere imagined herself a perfect mother, like some character in a movie."I thought I was going to be Julie Andrews," she said.By the time she finished having three children and adopting 12 more of all races, her family was a raucous concoction that bore no resemblance to "The Sound of Music" clan. And it didn't sing on key.But from the dissonance, Dr. Tremitiere learned valuable and poignantly hilarious lessons -- lessons she shared yesterday with members of the American Adoption Congress, which is holding its annual conference at the Radisson Hotel in downtown Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2004
Various Artists The Princess Diaries 2: Royal Engagement (Disney) ** God save the soundtrack to The Princess Diaries 2: Royal Engagement, the follow-up to Disney's sleeper swan hit about an awkward teen (Anne Hathaway) transformed into a princess thanks to a wise and regal figurehead (Julie Andrews). The only engaging tracks worthy of the king's ear come from teen acting queen Lindsay Lohan and American Idol matriarch Kelly Clarkson. Save a few original songs, most of the material on Princess Diaries 2 has been heard elsewhere.
FEATURES
By Kevin Thomas and Kevin Thomas,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 11, 2004
Princess Diaries 2: Royal Engagement marks a return to Ruritania that arrives just in time to delight adolescent girls - and perhaps their mothers and grandmothers as well - before summer vacation is over. Like its predecessor, it's Hollywood hokum at its most glamorous and effective. Sequels are always tricky, especially when they're pure make-believe, but old pro director Garry Marshall understands that unabashed fairy tales require solid acting to make them believable. Julie Andrews returns, eternally radiant as Queen Clarisse Renaldi of the tiny principality of Genovia, as does Anne Hathaway as her granddaughter and heir to the throne, Princess Mia. Andrews fans are treated to a surprise: some years after throat surgery rendered her unable to sing she is again easily able to duet with the singer Raven, cast as a pal of Mia's, in the rousing "Your Crowning Glory."
NEWS
By Adam M. Rosen and Adam M. Rosen,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2004
In just a few years, Monkton resident Carson Satterfield has produced and written for two magazines, reported for a national news publication, interviewed Peter Jennings and Julie Andrews, and attended a news summit convened by ABC News and Time Inc. this month. Carson is able to balance her journalistic pursuits with other responsibilities: cleaning her room, feeding her animals and doing her homework, usually pre-algebra problems. Carson is age 12 and finishing sixth grade at Hereford Middle School in northern Baltimore County.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2003
The biggest sign that something was different at last night's Oscars lay not in the predictable plethora of black gowns or the significant lack of blinding big rocks high-beaming from actresses' slender necks. Instead, the evening was different from Academy Awards of yesteryear in one glaring way: There were no outrageous fashion missteps. It was a year without stuffed swan frocks - circa Bjork 2001 - or style abominations like actress Sally Kirkland's 2002 metal alloy dress, which came with a pulley that raised a front panel like a curtain.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and By David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | December 26, 2001
The Kennedy Center Honors program is a strange hybrid. Part variety show, part awards program, part pop culture spectacle and national celebration, you might not think the parts would mesh - especially when the recipients range from Hollywood actors to Italian tenors on the same night. But in tonight's 24th annual edition of The Kennedy Center Honors: A Celebration of the Performing Arts, the disparate parts not only mesh, but they also click, crackle, sizzle, pop and light up the screen with moments of great entertainment and emotion.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 27, 1999
If you see only one made-for-TV holiday movie this year, make it "One Special Night," with Julie Andrews and James Garner.In fact, even if you hate holiday movies, see "One Special Night," tomorrow night at 9 on CBS. I haven't seen a pair of actors work this wonderfully together since Albert Finney and Tom Courtenay in "A Rather English Marriage" earlier this year on PBS' Masterpiece Theatre.Andrews plays Dr. Catherine Howard, a pediatric heart surgeon who drives a vintage Jaguar sports car and power walks to Mozart's Fifth Symphony.
NEWS
By Adam M. Rosen and Adam M. Rosen,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2004
In just a few years, Monkton resident Carson Satterfield has produced and written for two magazines, reported for a national news publication, interviewed Peter Jennings and Julie Andrews, and attended a news summit convened by ABC News and Time Inc. this month. Carson is able to balance her journalistic pursuits with other responsibilities: cleaning her room, feeding her animals and doing her homework, usually pre-algebra problems. Carson is age 12 and finishing sixth grade at Hereford Middle School in northern Baltimore County.
FEATURES
By Betsy Sharkey and Betsy Sharkey,Tribune Newspapers | January 15, 2010
Up in the Air . . ( 4 STARS) The great surprise of this film starring George Clooney as a traveling corporate hatchet man, is that it manages to humanize both sides of those who sit at the terrible table where layoffs are doled out. It would have been easy for director Jason Reitman to let the newly unemployed drift into melodrama; he didn't. It would have been easier still to vilify, at least a little, Clooney's bad-news bear; he doesn't. Instead, Reitman gives us the perfect movie for our times, with a near-perfect Clooney the cherry on top. "Up in the Air" turns out to be the quintessential upper.
NEWS
March 18, 1998
THE WALLS keep tumbling. We don't mean walls being demolished inside the Power Plant at the Inner Harbor, but the invisible walls that long hemmed in Baltimore and Maryland to their economic disadvantage.The joint bid by business executives from Maryland, Washington and Virginia to woo the 2012 Summer Olympics is practically an Olympian development in itself: The entities of this metropolitan market rarely see eye to eye.Corporate leaders have agreed to put up $6 million to $12 million in the next two years to prepare a "consolidated" bid for the International Olympic Committee.
NEWS
By Peter Marks and Peter Marks,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 2, 1996
Julie Andrews says that giving up the Tony nomination for her performance in "Victor/Victoria" was easy. It's doing "Victor/Victoria" that's hard.You try a dozen costume changes from woman to man to woman to man, sing a G flat powerfully enough to create the impression of shattering glass, run from one end of a stage to the other while three assistants wait in the wings with throat sprays and water bottles laced with Gatorade and dance the tango with Rachel...
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