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By Joe Amodio and Joe Amodio,Newsday | June 5, 2008
Julianne Moore is wearing little-to-no makeup and killer platform boots. And her laugh -- she laughs a lot -- is infectious. The whole casually sexy vibe is a far cry from Barbara Baekeland, the eccentric, socialite wife of a Bakelite plastics heir whose tragic life unfurls in Moore's latest feature film, Savage Grace, which opened last month. Later this summer comes Blindness, Jose Saramago's Nobel Prize-winning novel, in which she plays a more modest figure: the only sighted woman in a community stricken with a sudden, terrifying malady.
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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2012
Seeing HBO's latest trailer for "Game Change," the made-for-TV version of the 2008 GOP presidential campaign with John McCain and Sarah Palin, brought back memories of the early days of Z on TV when I was doing media-and-politics 24/7 -- and loving it. Check out the trailer, which includes the moment in Palin's interview with ABC's Charlie Gibson when she said she could see Russia from Alaska. And then, check out some of my on-the-run, review of the interview posted about 15 minutes after part one of the Gibson-Palin sitdown aired.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2000
For Julianne Moore, everything comes down to the vision thing. Not hers. Her director's. "I don't care what kind of vision it is, as long as they have one," says Moore, 38, who in just eight years has become one of the most sought-after actresses in Hollywood. And it's not just anyone who's been doing the seeking: since 1992, when audiences first noticed her as Annabella Sciorra's unfortunate friend in "The Hand That Rocks the Cradle," Moore has been recruited by an impressive roster of directors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | May 10, 2011
If you've seen a black SUV getting towed up Charles Street Tuesday with an attractive brunette and driver still inside, rest assured they are not the latest victims of Baltimore's municipal towing scandal . That's Julianne Moore in the back seat, playing former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin in "Game Change," an HBO movie about the 2008 presidential election being filmed in Baltimore . The actor who plays her driver can't be trusted to...
FEATURES
December 23, 2005
Julianne Moore (above) talks cinema with film professor Richard Brown on Movies 101 (10:30 p.m.-11 p.m., AMC).
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 17, 2006
Joe Roth has directed his movie adaptation of Richard Price's great American novel Freedomland as if it were a pilot for a new forensic series set in Jersey. The music blares, the camera bobs and the editing flashes to a cavalcade of ticked-off characters. A dazed white woman, Brenda Martin (Julianne Moore), passes through a housing project in the fictional city of Dempsy, N.J. It's a landscape of disaster, filled with crated refrigerators and candle-lit marchers urging law enforcers to seek missing children.
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By John Hartl and John Hartl,SEATTLE TIMES | October 31, 1997
One of a season of Thanksgiving-reunion movies, writer-director Bart Freundlich's debut, "The Myth of Fingerprints," is a sharply etched variation on a familiar theme: You can't go home again.Nothing spectacular happens during the course of this get-together, or at least nothing spectacular is acknowledged in this tense family, which prefers not to notice when a crisis is approaching. But Freundlich's screenplay keeps the tension and humor flowing as an unpleasant secret is unearthed and ignored, one affair dies and another is rekindled.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 27, 2007
Next may be the silliest movie of 2007. How silly? Hard to focus on just one example of its unceasing inanity, but try this: The film's plot centers on a guy who can see two minutes into his future, and efforts by the FBI to enlist his aid in the search for an atomic bomb buried somewhere near L.A. The idea is that he'll see it do something two minutes before it actually does, giving the FBI time to ... Next (Paramount Pictures) Starring Nicolas Cage, Julianne Moore, Jessica Biel. Directed by Lee Tamahori.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 5, 2007
The future looks bleak in Children of Men, a sci-fi thriller that has less to do with the plot - centering on a world where disease has left all the women sterile - than with the director's vision of where our culture is headed. That's not necessarily a bad thing, given that the director is Alfonso Cuaron, one of current cinema's most striking visual stylists - for proof, just check out the soaring majesty of Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. Children of Men is no less breathtaking, although toward a slightly different end; think of the new film as Potter if Voldemort took over.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 28, 2005
In a career filled with wonderful performances, Julianne Moore gives what may be her best in The Prize Winner of Defiance, Ohio, as a 1950s housewife and mother who raises a family on the strength of her ability to write catchy advertising jingles that win contests. What makes Moore's performance so remarkable is that she has to play an idealized mother, warm, nurturing, patient, smart, perfect in every way imaginable - especially in comparison to her worthless husband (Woody Harrelson)
NEWS
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2011
"Game Change," HBO's made-for-TV movie about the 2008 presidential election, started production in Baltimore on Wednesday with a flurry of casting news and the release of the first image of star Julianne Moore as former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin. Based on the best-selling nonfiction account of the election, HBO's film focuses on the campaign of Republican candidate Sen. John McCain from the time of his controversial pick of Palin as his running mate to the ticket's loss in the general election to Barack Obama.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | December 3, 2008
Swayze says he's doing just fine in cancer fight Patrick Swayze is angry about tabloid reports that say he doesn't have long to live. The actor, who was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer this year, issued a statement yesterday affirming that so far he is winning his fight against the disease and responding well to treatment. Swayze said of the publications: "They're reporting that I'm on my last legs and saying goodbye to my tearful family! ... It's upsetting that the shoddy and reckless reporting from these publications cast a negative shadow on the positive and good fight I'm fighting."
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | June 27, 2008
Little ferocity or elegance go on display in Savage Grace, a tale of decline and decadence in a wealthy American family set in New York, Paris, London and Spain's chic Costa Brava. It stars Stephen Dillane as Brooks Baekeland, the socially recessive heir to a family fortune (his grandfather, a plastics pioneer, invented Bakelite), Julianne Moore as Barbara Daly Baekeland, his flamboyant wife, and Eddie Redmayne as Tony, their sadly inchoate son. The famous book of the same name (by Natalie Robins and Steven M.L. Aronson)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joe Amodio and Joe Amodio,Newsday | June 5, 2008
Julianne Moore is wearing little-to-no makeup and killer platform boots. And her laugh -- she laughs a lot -- is infectious. The whole casually sexy vibe is a far cry from Barbara Baekeland, the eccentric, socialite wife of a Bakelite plastics heir whose tragic life unfurls in Moore's latest feature film, Savage Grace, which opened last month. Later this summer comes Blindness, Jose Saramago's Nobel Prize-winning novel, in which she plays a more modest figure: the only sighted woman in a community stricken with a sudden, terrifying malady.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 27, 2007
Next may be the silliest movie of 2007. How silly? Hard to focus on just one example of its unceasing inanity, but try this: The film's plot centers on a guy who can see two minutes into his future, and efforts by the FBI to enlist his aid in the search for an atomic bomb buried somewhere near L.A. The idea is that he'll see it do something two minutes before it actually does, giving the FBI time to ... Next (Paramount Pictures) Starring Nicolas Cage, Julianne Moore, Jessica Biel. Directed by Lee Tamahori.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 5, 2007
The future looks bleak in Children of Men, a sci-fi thriller that has less to do with the plot - centering on a world where disease has left all the women sterile - than with the director's vision of where our culture is headed. That's not necessarily a bad thing, given that the director is Alfonso Cuaron, one of current cinema's most striking visual stylists - for proof, just check out the soaring majesty of Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. Children of Men is no less breathtaking, although toward a slightly different end; think of the new film as Potter if Voldemort took over.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 30, 2004
Stumbling over a rival's legal files and stuffing her face with junk food, Julianne Moore succumbs to routine Hollywood caricature of the sexually repressed professional woman in Laws of Attraction. This attempt at a battle-of-the-sexes courtroom romance pits Moore's legendary divorce attorney Audrey Woods against a rumpled, equally unstoppable male divorce attorney, Daniel Rafferty (Pierce Brosnan). The model may be Adam's Rib, but in that entertaining, sophisticated Tracy-Hepburn vehicle, the principals were already married, their strengths and weaknesses well-matched.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | June 27, 2008
Little ferocity or elegance go on display in Savage Grace, a tale of decline and decadence in a wealthy American family set in New York, Paris, London and Spain's chic Costa Brava. It stars Stephen Dillane as Brooks Baekeland, the socially recessive heir to a family fortune (his grandfather, a plastics pioneer, invented Bakelite), Julianne Moore as Barbara Daly Baekeland, his flamboyant wife, and Eddie Redmayne as Tony, their sadly inchoate son. The famous book of the same name (by Natalie Robins and Steven M.L. Aronson)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | September 1, 2006
Insufferable people acting insufferably seems like a slender hook on which to hang a film, but that's exactly how Trust The Man plays out. It's a story about two jerks without a thread of class between them, in relationships with women who must see something in them that's invisible to the rest of the world. It's also yet another film about quirky New Yorkers cracking wise on their way through the complicated world of modern romance, territory Woody Allen mined out years ago. Writer-director Bart Freundlich (The Myth of Fingerprints)
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 17, 2006
Joe Roth has directed his movie adaptation of Richard Price's great American novel Freedomland as if it were a pilot for a new forensic series set in Jersey. The music blares, the camera bobs and the editing flashes to a cavalcade of ticked-off characters. A dazed white woman, Brenda Martin (Julianne Moore), passes through a housing project in the fictional city of Dempsy, N.J. It's a landscape of disaster, filled with crated refrigerators and candle-lit marchers urging law enforcers to seek missing children.
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