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Julian Bond

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NEWS
January 20, 1991
Perspectives on the history of the U.S. civil rights movement will be the topic of a lecture by Julian Bond, former Georgia state senator, 1968 Democratic vice presidential nominee, and a nationally recognized leader of the drive for equality for more than 20 years.The event, at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 13, is part of Western Maryland College's Black History Celebration 1991. It is free and open to the public.Seating is limited in McDaniel Lounge, so attendees are advised to come early. Joslyn Martin, WMC Class of 1991 and president of the Black Student Union, will introduce Bond.
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NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2014
Cornell William Brooks, an attorney and minister from Northern Virginia, will lead the nation's oldest and largest civil rights organization at a time when the NAACP is experiencing a resurgence in influence and recruitment but struggling with budget issues. Brooks, whose appointment was announced Saturday, becomes the 18th person to oversee the Baltimore-based group, which includes more than 2,000 local units nationwide. As CEO, the 53-year-old Brooks follows Benjamin Jealous, whom many credit for helping to modernize the NAACP and return it to prominence.
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NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | October 7, 1994
Julian Bond, a civil rights activist and critic of embattled NAACP Chairman William F. Gibson, said yesterday that he is running as a reform candidate for a spot on the 64-member NAACP board.Mr. Bond, 54, said he wants to bring "fiscal and moral integrity" to the Baltimore-based civil rights organization, whose chairman was accused this week by syndicated columnist Carl T. Rowan of skimming thousands of dollars from NAACP coffers."If these charges are true -- and I believe them -- the decent thing for [Dr. Gibson]
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jack W. Germond, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2012
I remember feeling trepidation when Jules Witcover and I, partners in writing our political column, joined The Baltimore Sun after the collapse of the Washington Star left us on the beach in August of 1981. I was aware of The Sun 's reputation for quality, and I had read the paper often in the 20 years I had been covering Washington and national politics. I knew the work of its stars - notably Phil Potter, Pat Furgurson and later Paul West - because we often were covering the same story.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | October 7, 1994
Julian Bond, a civil rights activist and critic of embattled NAACP Chairman William F. Gibson, said yesterday that he is running as a reform candidate for a spot on the 64-member NAACP board.Mr. Bond, 54, said he wants to bring "fiscal and moral integrity" to the Baltimore-based civil rights organization, whose chairman was accused this week by syndicated columnist Carl T. Rowan of skimming thousands of dollars from NAACP coffers."If these charges are true -- and I believe them -- the decent thing for [Dr. Gibson]
NEWS
February 24, 1998
SMILES AND good wishes accompanied the election Saturday of Julian Bond as NAACP board chairman. But by making one of his first acts the reinstatement of a tainted executive committee member, Mr. Bond may have set back an organization still trying to restore public confidence.Many were surprised when Mr. Bond nonchalantly included James E. Ghee on his list of executive committee members. Mr. Ghee, a Farmville, Va., lawyer, was one of four board members with ethics problems asked to resign last year by the departing board chairwoman, Myrlie Evers-Williams.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson | October 27, 1991
The success of former Ku Klux Klansman David Duke as a Republican gubernatorial candidate in Louisiana and the possibility of losing an important battle with the U.S. Senate forced President Bush to support a civil rights bill in Congress, civil rights leader Julian Bond told a gathering of Maryland NAACP leaders yesterday."
NEWS
By Don Markus | don.markus@baltsun.com | February 25, 2010
Roslyn Brock was trying to decide between running for president of the student government at Virginia Union University and pursuing another position at the historically black college in Richmond. She called home to Maryland for advice. More than two decades later, her mother remembers the conversation. "My comment to her was, 'If someone came to the campus looking for a voice, would they ask an individual who's chair of a particular group or ask for the SGA president?' " Eladies Sampson said this week.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1998
NEW YORK - Civil rights leader Julian Bond, pledging to maintain the NAACP's newfound stability and incorporate other minorities into the organization, was elected chairman of the board yesterday.It's a daunting responsibility," Bond said.First, we want to continue to restore fiscal sanity and, second, we want to restore integrity and civility.We want to be sure the NAACP's voice is heard wherever race is discussed in the country, whether in the White House or in neighborhood stores," he said.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | January 17, 1996
Honoring the legacy of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., veteran civil rights leader Julian Bond last night urged county residents to continue to fight racism."
NEWS
February 23, 2011
After reading former NAACP chairman Julian Bond's comments on same-sex marriage ("Julian Bond: Md. must end marriage discrimination," Feb. 18), I have come to the conclusion that many of the people whom I once held in high regard have lost their way. If you ask the smallest child about marriage, they will answer marriage is between a man and a woman. All logic not to mention the Bible prove this. The attempt to link same-sex marriage with civil rights is demeaning to the civil rights movement.
NEWS
February 18, 2011
As a civil right activist, I have spent my life fighting to make ours a more just and fair society. That's why I urge the Maryland General Assembly to support marriage equality and pass the Religious Freedom and Civil Marriage Protection Act. I firmly believe that this is a matter of civil rights, equal protection and equality. Civil rights are positive legal prerogatives — the right to equal treatment before the law. These are rights shared by everyone; there is no one in the United States who does not — or should not — share in enjoying these rights.
NEWS
By Don Markus | don.markus@baltsun.com | February 25, 2010
Roslyn Brock was trying to decide between running for president of the student government at Virginia Union University and pursuing another position at the historically black college in Richmond. She called home to Maryland for advice. More than two decades later, her mother remembers the conversation. "My comment to her was, 'If someone came to the campus looking for a voice, would they ask an individual who's chair of a particular group or ask for the SGA president?' " Eladies Sampson said this week.
NEWS
August 2, 2006
Three years from now, the NAACP will turn 100. Where will it celebrate its centennial? At a shiny new office complex overlooking the Potomac River in Prince George's County? In downtown Washington? Or in Baltimore, where the oldest civil-rights organization in the country moved its national headquarters from New York 20 years ago? The answer may depend upon whether Maryland or Baltimore can overcome strong aspirations by the organization's board of directors -- and particularly Chairman Julian Bond -- to relocate to the Washington area.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | December 1, 2004
KWEISI MFUME had that "Lyndon Johnson" gleam in his eye. The man whose name means "conquering son of kings" strode yesterday into the press room of the NAACP's national headquarters to a welcome fit for, well, a conquering son of kings. The assembled NAACP staffers and some of the reporters cheered and gave him a standing ovation. As Mfume smiled and waved, it reminded me of how happy President Lyndon Johnson looked the day he left office. For those of you who either don't remember or weren't around, it was on Jan. 20, 1969, that Johnson, wearing a smile so broad it could have reached back to his ranch in Texas, gleefully clasped hands and waved goodbye to his stint as 36th president of the United States.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | October 30, 2004
MAYBE SOME enterprising soul with an appreciation of irony should post a sign outside the NAACP national headquarters on Mount Hope Drive: "Chickens come home to roost here." And come home to roost they have. Start building the chicken coops. In July, NAACP board Chairman Julian Bond -- whose mouth should have been retired when his old organization, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, drifted into irrelevance back in the late '60s -- served up one of his patented anti-President Bush, anti-Republican salvos.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,sun staff | April 19, 1998
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. - Reluctantly leaving the sunshine and soft, new grass of a spring afternoon, students at the University of Virginia trickle inside for their history class, a two-hour, once-a-week seminar titled "The Black & White '60s."As naturally as a river splitting into two forks, black students drift toward one side of the room; whites head for the other. The last student to arrive, a visually impaired white man guided by a seeing-eye dog, sits among the black students.Professor Julian Bond obviously has his work cut out for him.At 58, the civil rights veteran is now teaching what he once lived.
NEWS
February 23, 2011
After reading former NAACP chairman Julian Bond's comments on same-sex marriage ("Julian Bond: Md. must end marriage discrimination," Feb. 18), I have come to the conclusion that many of the people whom I once held in high regard have lost their way. If you ask the smallest child about marriage, they will answer marriage is between a man and a woman. All logic not to mention the Bible prove this. The attempt to link same-sex marriage with civil rights is demeaning to the civil rights movement.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | March 18, 2001
I HAVE COMMITTED a grievous sin against the people of Arkansas. Exactly four weeks ago, I wrote a column about our former president, one William Jefferson "Hide-the-womenfolk-and-silverware-when-he-comes-a'callin'" Clinton and his proposal to move his office to New York City's predominantly black Harlem. I advised the people of Harlem to "boot this moral pariah back to Arkansas where he belongs." The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette reprinted the column about a week later. Several Arkansans read it and were with me until that final sentence.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | February 19, 1999
Over nearly four decades in the public eye, Julian Bond has had his ups and downs. Today, as far as the NAACP is concerned, he is up.Way up.As the NAACP celebrates its 90th year with its annual meeting in Washington tomorrow, the history professor marks his first anniversary as chairman of the national board amid praise from most who work with him.Some charge that Bond's focus on tried-and-true civil rights issues such as voter registration and prisoners' rights...
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