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Julia Keller

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NEWS
February 9, 2004
On February 7, 2004 HELEN ELAINE SCHILDWACHTER of Sykesville; beloved wife of Frederick W. Schildwachter, dear sister of Parke Everhart, Julia E. Keller and Raechel Riffle.Funeral services will be held on Wednesday at 11 A.M. from Holy Spirit Lutheran Church, Eldersburg. Interment in Druid Ridge Cemetery. Friends may call at the Haight Funeral Home & Chapel, Rt. 32 near Eldersburg on Tuesday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. Those desiring, may make contributions to Carroll Hospice, 95 Carroll St., Westminster, MD 21157.
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NEWS
By Julia Keller | October 28, 1999
NOW THAT the giggles have simmered down, perhaps we can take a moment to ask just what's so funny and/or outlandish about a potential slate of presidential candidates that includes Warren Beatty, Jesse Ventura and Donald Trump.Sure, I know the drill: Anyone of a serious turn of mind is supposed to get all itchy and outraged -- or else amused and dismissive -- about this purportedly whimsical turn in U.S. politics. We're supposed to rail against the silliness, the lack of appropriate gravity toward our government.
FEATURES
By Julia Keller and Julia Keller,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 25, 2002
In the sprawling parking lot of contemporary American culture, the one with the wadded-up Burger King bags skittering across it like urban tumbleweed, Kmart is a Winnebago straddling two spaces. It's way too big to ignore. From the perky preamble of its in-store public address system announcement - "Attention Kmart shoppers!" - to the moniker for Kmart's get-'em-while-they're-hot bargains - Blue Light specials - Kmart resonates. But the most significant cultural contribution of the company, which filed for bankruptcy earlier this week and faces an uncertain future, may be its status as the only business establishment in American history to have served as the label for a major literary genre.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julia Keller and By Julia Keller,Special to the Sun | December 8, 2002
Like splinters, certain words persistently get under people's skins. Such a word is academic -- as a noun, not an adjective -- and its snooty linguistic sibling, intellectual. Those words are so off-putting to so many people that a nonprofit organization recently was forced to change its name in order to avoid being stereotyped as a bunch of elitist snobs. This is an ironic destiny for a group actually devoted to reaching as many different kinds of people as possible, not to closing itself off to just a privileged few. Thus, Chicago's Center for Public Intellectuals, founded in 1999, is now the Public Square (www.
NEWS
By Julia Keller | July 22, 1999
THE TOWN was so desperately poor that the little girls had no dolls to play with. Instead, they made do with corn cobs wrapped in rags. On many nights, supper was flour and water mixed with bacon drippings, and even at that, there wasn't enough to go around.That's the portrait drawn by Robert Caro in his biography of former President Lyndon B. Johnson. This visual image is gripping because of its insistence that childhood is the crucible of destiny: "[Johnson] came out of the Hill Country formed, shaped -- into a shape so hard it would never change," Mr. Caro wrote of the 36th president.
FEATURES
By JULIA KELLER and JULIA KELLER,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 4, 2006
Rarely does an Adam Sandler movie spark deep critical thinking. But in the new movie Click, Sandler plays a man whose remote control can ride herd over not just his TV, but also over time itself. He can fast-forward, pause, rewind. The remote control seems so ordinary that its extraordinariness is easy to miss. In the half-century since it was first hooked to TVs in American homes, the remote control has become faster, easier, sleeker, more efficient, more sophisticated and applicable to a spiraling number of gadgets: DVD players, ceiling fans, automobiles, draperies, security systems.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julia Keller and Julia Keller,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 9, 2002
Like Lot's wife, you have to look. It is every bit as dreadful as you fear. The approximately three-minute video of the murder of journalist Daniel Pearl was posted recently on the Web site of a popular and respected newspaper, vastly expanding access to the horrific images. While the video had appeared earlier on an obscure site, the decision by Stephen M. Mindich, publisher of the Boston Phoenix, to post a link on his paper's home page was a watershed moment, raising profound moral questions about the balance between privacy and freedom of information, between voyeurism and the desire to understand the depth of hatred in the world.
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