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Jules Witcover

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By Lars-Erik Nelson and Lars-Erik Nelson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 15, 1997
"The Year the Dream Died," by Jules Witcover, Warner Books. 560 pages. $25.Like the Balkans, the year 1968 produced more history than it could consume: a seemingly endless war in Vietnam, a bitterly divisive Democratic presidential primary campaign, the assassinations of Martin Luther King and Bobby Kennedy, riots in cities and on college campuses, a violent Democratic convention in Chicago, the election of Richard Nixon as President.The dream that died -- for many Americans -- was belief in democracy.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 5, 2014
President Obama's firing of Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki, transparently dressed up as a resignation under congressional pressure, seemed somehow out of character for a chief executive known for patience and dislike of wielding the knife. The retired Army general and Vietnam combat veteran had matched Mr. Obama's own style of cautious deliberation in coping with the VA scandal that left thousands of patients waiting interminable months for medical treatment, some even dying while they waited.
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NEWS
April 22, 1994
Beginning next week, the political column by Jack Germond and Jules Witcover will run Tuesday through Friday in The Evening Sun and Saturday in The Sun.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | February 28, 2014
In the already tiresome guessing game of whether or not Hillary Clinton will run for president in 2016, there's a wide assumption among Democrats that the nomination is hers for the asking. One apparent rationale is that the party has no one else to turn to who has comparable national recognition or appeal. The assumption is somewhat predicated on an expectation that Vice President Joe Biden would step aside, either out of a conviction that he could not beat her in primary competition or that his public image is so tattered as to render his nomination inconceivable.
NEWS
February 23, 1992
Beginning this week, you'll find some changes on Page 2A of The Sun. Columnist Roger Simon moves to the page on Sunday, Monday, Wednesday and Friday. On Tuesday and Thursday, The Sun's foreign correspondents take you beyond the news in the Foreign Closeup feature. On Saturday, the page will feature national columnists Jack Germond and Jules Witcover, who will write from the campaign trail, along with a political feature by The Sun's national or state staff and a glance at the week ahead in politics.
NEWS
July 25, 2012
I'm assuming it was cathartic for Jules Witcover to write his op-ed piece regarding next month's Republican National Convention ("Don't expect much excitement at the GOP convention," July 24). Couldn't he have gone farther in bad-mouthing more Republicans? One statement he got right was his suggestion that delegates are "are likely to be disappointed ... beyond a loud chorus against President Obama, who remains the prime unifying factor for all Republicans. " Marie Mullen, Joppa
NEWS
July 5, 2013
Here we go again. Jules Witcover, a known promoter of the liberal agenda, is bashing the GOP ("Boehner's stance on immigration puts GOP in peril," July 2). I guess he would like the Republicans in the House to just follow whatever the Democratic Senate sends to them. It doesn't seem to work the other way around, however, as anything the House sends to the Senate, Harry Reid never even brings to the floor. Mr. Witcover writes that President Barack Obama and his fellow Democrats were "frustrated throughout the president's first term by Republican congressional roadblocks.
NEWS
By CARL SCHOETTLER and CARL SCHOETTLER,SUN REPORTER | December 11, 2005
American Gunfight: The Plot to Kill Harry Truman - and the Shoot-out that Stopped It Stephen Hunter and John Bainbridge Jr. The Making of an Ink-Stained Wretch Jules Witcover The Johns Hopkins University Press / 368 pages Jules Witcover may feel he's still an ink-stained wretch at 78, after a half-century in the news business. But he has loved every minute he has spent in newspapering. Or at least pretty many of them. "I've spent thousands of hours sitting, drinking, singing, writing and only occasionally sleeping on whistle stop trains, press buses, and planes from New Hampshire to California," he writes.
TOPIC
By Paul Moore | August 28, 2005
AN OPINION piece published Aug. 14 in The Sun's Opinion/Commentary page - "Can newspapers reverse their decline?" - offered a quick overview of the state of newspaper journalism in America. Michael Socolow, a journalism professor at Brandeis University, argued that recent decisions by newspaper owners and publishers have contributed as much to the crisis in credibility and circulation as the well-publicized ethical scandals at The New York Times, USA Today and other newspapers. He lamented the loss of competition among newspapers: "By the early 1990s, newspaper companies and their corporate owners believed that double-digit profit margins were normal for the business ... . Worse, they took their monopoly for granted and assumed news consumers were satisfied."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | October 17, 1999
It has become our practice that books by Sun staffers are presented in this space to avoid appearances of hypocritical objectivity. None have I looked forward to more than a pair by two of my most illustrious colleagues: Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover.They are, of course, that team of Clydesdales whose co-authored column appears on our pages and on many others in the well-informed world. Based in our Washington bureau, they range around the nation and beyond, and have been paired since 1977, first at the old Washington Star.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 27, 2013
As President Obama tries to enjoy his Christmas vacation in Hawaii (the land of his birth, as recognized by most Americans except the diehard fringe still casting him as a foreigner), he has a lot to reflect on. In his last White House press conference before departing, he exchanged tidings of good cheer with reporters. But he was also peppered with as many reminders of how badly things turned out for him in the past year. It fell to the toughest but fairest reporter in the room, ABC News' Jonathan Karl, to confront him with the bark off: "You may not want to call it the worst year of your presidency, but it's clearly been a tough year.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | September 1, 2013
A striking contrast between the 1963 March on Washington and Wednesday's 50th anniversary celebration of it (and of Martin Luther King's historic "I have a dream" speech) was the visible unity and nonpartisanship of the first and the scarcity of both in the second. In the voices the other day of three Democratic presidents -- Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton and Barack Obama -- and of not a single prominent Republican leader, past or present, the program seemed at times more a self-congratulatory Democratic rally.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 27, 2013
President Barack Obama, in a sea of foreign policy troubles, accepted his leadership responsibilities in a CNN interview last week while lamenting the complexity of these challenges. He noted the old Harry Truman dictum that "the buck stops" in the Oval Office and asserted U.S. power and influence in the world must be "in our long-term national interests. " He mentioned both in the context of the developing civil wars in Egypt and Syria and growing calls for American intervention. The reports that chemical weapons were used by the regime in Syria against the insurgents, he said, "starts getting to some core national interests that the United States has, both in terms of us making sure that weapons of mass destruction are not proliferating, as well as needing to protect our allies [and]
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 23, 2013
The release of the last 340 hours of the Nixon White House tapes adds little to what we know by now about the first American president to resign. Indeed, the final installment doesn't tell us much more than we should have known about him long before the first tapes were ever released. Except for documenting his excessive use of profanity, his contempt for many political figures including those working for him, and his galloping personal insecurity, the real Richard Nixon was always there to be seen.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 19, 2013
While many of his fellow Republicans continue seeking the Holy Grail of defunding Obamacare and another possible government shutdown over it, New Jersey's brash Gov. Chris Christie has made them an offer they would be wise not to refuse. The political version of Tony Soprano told members of the Republican National Committee at their recent meeting in Boston: "I'm in this business to win. I don't know why you're in it. ... We are not a debating society; we are a political operation that needs to win. " In the classic in-your-face style for which his state is known, Mr. Christie called on the RNC members to get out of the clouds and down to Earth, focusing on practical politics rather than lofty academic theories on the moral superiority of conservatism.
NEWS
July 5, 2013
Here we go again. Jules Witcover, a known promoter of the liberal agenda, is bashing the GOP ("Boehner's stance on immigration puts GOP in peril," July 2). I guess he would like the Republicans in the House to just follow whatever the Democratic Senate sends to them. It doesn't seem to work the other way around, however, as anything the House sends to the Senate, Harry Reid never even brings to the floor. Mr. Witcover writes that President Barack Obama and his fellow Democrats were "frustrated throughout the president's first term by Republican congressional roadblocks.
NEWS
By Francis E. Rourke | February 23, 1992
CRAPSHOOT: ROLLING THE DICEON THE VICE PRESIDENCY.Jules Witcover.Crown.450 pages. $25. Cynics might suggest that life is too short to read a whole book about a political office with so little real power as the American vice presidency. Jules Witcover's "Crapshoot" could change their minds. It is a highly entertaining look at the trials and tribulations of all the men who found themselves in that lofty but far from exalted post.No review can do justice to the colorful account Mr. Witcover -- a political columnist for The Baltimore Sun -- presents of the political intrigue that has surrounded so many contests for the vice presidential nomination, especially the struggle that occurred with the Democrats in 1944, when party leaders successfully conspired to replace Henry A. Wallace with Harry S Truman as the nominee.
NEWS
By David Holahan | February 17, 1992
CRAPSHOOT: Rolling the Dice on the Vice Presidency. By Jules Witcover. Crown Publishers. 450 pages. $20. THE VICE PRESIDENCY is one of those rare human creations that is difficult to libel. Before lowering himself (from Senate majority leader) to accept the post, Lyndon Johnson termed it a "part-time job." Thomas R. Marshall, Woodrow Wilson's inept understudy (a Hoosier, like our current veep) described it this way: "[The vice president] is like a man in a cataleptic state: He cannot speak; he cannot move; he suffers no pain."
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 21, 2013
There is something about the start of a second presidential term that induces talk and speculation about the incumbent's eventual "legacy. " Such notions are usually based on the president's accomplishments in the first term, plus expectations -- or fears -- of what might yet come. In most cases in recent times, the optimism that greeted the first term was dampened somewhat by the beginning of the second term. Bad economic times, war or other foreign policy intrusion, or some personal presidential shortcoming had taken a toll.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 14, 2013
The latest open debate over security and privacy is a welcome pivot from the irksome father-knows-best attitude that has prevailed too long regarding the government's contention of superior judgment in the realm of national security. As with most cases of governmental excess in the shadow world of intelligence, the attitude goes a long way back in American history. It can be traced at least to the Alien and Sedition Acts under John Adams, and Abraham Lincoln's suppression of the habeas corpus protection that trampled civil liberties in the young nation and then in the Civil War. Later, there was Lyndon Johnson's defense of expanding the American military role in Vietnam based on the supposedly superior intelligence he possessed, and then Richard Nixon's arrogant contention that if the president of the United States did something, that automatically made it not only right but legal.
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