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NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Sun Staff Writer Staff writer Shirley Leung contributed to this article | July 20, 1994
Rose Suit looked at the 1940s juicer with tears streaming down her cheeks.It was just an old-fashioned juicer, the manual type with a handle you yank down hard.But to Rose Suit, it is a touchstone from the best years of her life."Many a time I squeezed that durn orange juice out at Park Circle," said Mrs. Suit, 71. "You squeezed them oranges, you didn't get them out of a can. People wouldn't drink juice out of a can."Park Circle was home to Baltimore's first White Tower restaurant and the juicer is now behind glass at the Peale Museum downtown, where Rose Suit and about a dozen of her retired "Towerette" colleagues gathered last night for a reunion.
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NEWS
September 10, 2013
It was excellent that readers could see that experts say smoothies and fruit drinks could sabotage their healthy diets ("Debate swirls over juicing," Sept. 5). Doctors have known this for years. I've told hundreds of patients that I have a pound of tomatoes and a pound of celery in the blender every day. My "V2" has no added sodium like purchased V8. A tomato carries seeds and follows a flower on the vine, so it is a fruit. It has more potassium and less calories than bananas, pound for pound.
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BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | September 12, 1992
Anybody who still thinks that eating healthy is equivalent to having your taste buds removed hasn't sampled Timber Crest Farms' dried tomato spice medley.Just a taste will leave you wondering how they were able to cram 20 pounds of rich caponata-style relish flavoring into an 8-ounce jar.And if you're a graduate of the no-fat-means-no-taste culinary institute, then it's time to chomp on a Soy Boy vegetarian hot dog made of soy protein, wheat gluten, herbs and other ingredients.These were just a few of the tasty treats being served up at the Natural Products Expo East at the Baltimore Convention Center.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | August 2, 2005
RAFAEL PALMEIRO sounded pretty convincing yesterday when he explained how he had "unintentionally" used a banned steroid. He was even more convincing last March when he told a congressional committee he had "never used steroids - period." But Palmeiro's ability to look and sound believable no longer matters. All that matters is a single, cold, hard, unalterable fact - he failed a steroid test and was suspended yesterday. He juiced. And got caught. That can't be spun, interpreted, denied, avoided or ignored.
NEWS
September 10, 2013
It was excellent that readers could see that experts say smoothies and fruit drinks could sabotage their healthy diets ("Debate swirls over juicing," Sept. 5). Doctors have known this for years. I've told hundreds of patients that I have a pound of tomatoes and a pound of celery in the blender every day. My "V2" has no added sodium like purchased V8. A tomato carries seeds and follows a flower on the vine, so it is a fruit. It has more potassium and less calories than bananas, pound for pound.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | August 2, 2005
RAFAEL PALMEIRO sounded pretty convincing yesterday when he explained how he had "unintentionally" used a banned steroid. He was even more convincing last March when he told a congressional committee he had "never used steroids - period." But Palmeiro's ability to look and sound believable no longer matters. All that matters is a single, cold, hard, unalterable fact - he failed a steroid test and was suspended yesterday. He juiced. And got caught. That can't be spun, interpreted, denied, avoided or ignored.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | March 9, 1994
Outside, sleet and snow and freezing rain are piling up in dismal mounds of slush. Inside, chefs Jerry Edwards and David Fusting are performing magic.With a few props, and a little assistance from an observer, they are whipping up a quartet of savory, scrumptious, simply smashing vegetable sauces that light up meat, fish and poultry the way Bastille Day lights up Paris. It's hard to believe that such a flavor wallop can be packed into such a simple package.And there's more: These rich and varied sauces fit perfectly into a healthful diet.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | January 12, 1994
Q: Jalapeno peppers seem to vary so much in their heat that I never know what result I will get with a recipe. Any suggestions?A: Fresh jalapeno peppers do have different heat levels, so I have come to rely on jarred pickled jalapenos for recipes, for both heat and convenience. No need to don gloves to cut and remove seeds. Just use the amount called for in the recipe (adding a little extra if you want it quite spicy). One medium jalapeno pepper equals one generous tablespoon of pickled, sliced jalapenos.
FEATURES
By Gerald Etter and Gerald Etter,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 15, 1992
When she was a child, says Cheri Calbom, co-author of "Juicing for Life: A Guide to the Health Benefits of Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Juicing" (Avery Publishing, $12.95, paperback), she wasn't particularly healthy or energetic."These days, I'm a high energy person," she says.What's made the big change in her life? According to Ms. Calbom, her new-found energy and health is due to juicing.For the uninitiated, juicing is simply taking advantage of the benefits of fruits and vegetables by putting them through a machine -- a juicer -- that extracts their juices while separating the pulp.
NEWS
By Pete Pichaske | August 14, 2014
The new Columbia Whole Foods, the first Whole Foods in Howard County, will open Aug. 20 and include the following: • a vegetarian diner, called The Counter; • a café that seats about 140, overlooks Lake Kittamaqundi, and includes an outdoor dining area on the lake; • a do-it-yourself body care department where customers can customize their items; • a juicer where customers can squeeze their own fresh orange juice; •...
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Sun Staff Writer Staff writer Shirley Leung contributed to this article | July 20, 1994
Rose Suit looked at the 1940s juicer with tears streaming down her cheeks.It was just an old-fashioned juicer, the manual type with a handle you yank down hard.But to Rose Suit, it is a touchstone from the best years of her life."Many a time I squeezed that durn orange juice out at Park Circle," said Mrs. Suit, 71. "You squeezed them oranges, you didn't get them out of a can. People wouldn't drink juice out of a can."Park Circle was home to Baltimore's first White Tower restaurant and the juicer is now behind glass at the Peale Museum downtown, where Rose Suit and about a dozen of her retired "Towerette" colleagues gathered last night for a reunion.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | March 9, 1994
Outside, sleet and snow and freezing rain are piling up in dismal mounds of slush. Inside, chefs Jerry Edwards and David Fusting are performing magic.With a few props, and a little assistance from an observer, they are whipping up a quartet of savory, scrumptious, simply smashing vegetable sauces that light up meat, fish and poultry the way Bastille Day lights up Paris. It's hard to believe that such a flavor wallop can be packed into such a simple package.And there's more: These rich and varied sauces fit perfectly into a healthful diet.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | September 12, 1992
Anybody who still thinks that eating healthy is equivalent to having your taste buds removed hasn't sampled Timber Crest Farms' dried tomato spice medley.Just a taste will leave you wondering how they were able to cram 20 pounds of rich caponata-style relish flavoring into an 8-ounce jar.And if you're a graduate of the no-fat-means-no-taste culinary institute, then it's time to chomp on a Soy Boy vegetarian hot dog made of soy protein, wheat gluten, herbs and other ingredients.These were just a few of the tasty treats being served up at the Natural Products Expo East at the Baltimore Convention Center.
FEATURES
By Ginger Munsch Crichton and Ginger Munsch Crichton,Dallas Morning News | May 27, 1992
From California "juice bars" to the kitchens in your neighborhood, interest in fresh-squeezed juices is growing -- and not just in orange or grapefruit. These days, it could just as easily be carrot, wheatgrass, strawberry or peach."The cocktail for the '90s is juice," says Barbara Westfield, director of marketing and product development for Salton Housewares, which makes juicer equipment. Most of the more exotic juices can be made only with hefty juice extractors.Juice enthusiasts say raw fruits and vegetables are among the most healthful foods people can eat, and that juices provide a concentrated source of vitamins and minerals in an easy-to-eat, easy-to-digest form.
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