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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2012
The whole dustup surrounding Rush Limbaugh is decidedly not rated G. Slut this. Prostitute that. So when confronted by a critic, the station that airs the Limbaugh show locally understandably attempted to point to something even worse than a talk show host that calls a Georgetown law student a "slut" on air. What could be worse? In the opinion of Bob Petitt, the general manager of WCBM 680 AM, it might be 98 Rock's "Jugs for Plugs" feature, where women eagerly volunteer to flash themselves before the morning disc jockeys in exchange for air time to promote their businesses.
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By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2012
A just-opened boardwalk and creekside platform offer new access to a nature preserve at the southwestern edge of Anne Arundel County, providing kayakers with an entry by water and hikers with and a up-close encounters with its marsh. "The wetland is there. And you can see it through the trees. But without a boardwalk, you can't take advantage of it, both for research and the public," said Chris Swarth, the longtime director of the Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary. At 1,600 acres, it's the largest of Anne Arundel County's parks and hugs an area of the Patuxent River that is popular with kayakers and canoeists.
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NEWS
By ROSALIE M. FALTER | February 14, 1994
You may think the North Pole has drifted south when you drive past the St. John Lutheran Church Co-Operative Nursery School on Maple Road.The 4-year-old children there have been collecting empty milk jugs, then cutting and melding them together into a 4-foot-high igloo.The children used 263 milk jugs for the school project.Jane Soverns, director and teacher at the nursery school, said the idea started with a story the children were reading about a penguin who hated cold weather and lived in an igloo.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2012
The whole dustup surrounding Rush Limbaugh is decidedly not rated G. Slut this. Prostitute that. So when confronted by a critic, the station that airs the Limbaugh show locally understandably attempted to point to something even worse than a talk show host that calls a Georgetown law student a "slut" on air. What could be worse? In the opinion of Bob Petitt, the general manager of WCBM 680 AM, it might be 98 Rock's "Jugs for Plugs" feature, where women eagerly volunteer to flash themselves before the morning disc jockeys in exchange for air time to promote their businesses.
FEATURES
By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,KING FEATURES | February 18, 1996
I collect empty Scotch whisky jugs. I just found one that is marked "Imported by Mihalovitch Fletcher and Co., Cincinnati, Ohio." What gives?In the late 1800s, the Scots began to export their trademark Scotch whisky to the United States. When it was sold in the United Kingdom, the scotch was packed in earthenware jugs decorated with transfer prints.Some scotch distillers sent filled jugs. Others, realizing that the jugs weighed a lot and took up space, shipped their scotch in bulk to be rebottled in the United States.
SPORTS
June 29, 1995
Dear Mr. Baseball:What does a player get if he hits the "Hit it Here" sign at the ballpark?Eric Skolnick, M.D.BaltimoreDear Eric Skolnick, M.D.:As Mr. Baseball recalls, Todd Frohwirth received a nice premium, lunch and a movie with consumer watchdog Odonna Mathews when he pointed repeatedly to Giant supermarket's bullpen sign in 1992. But until your question, no one ever had sought the story behind "Hit it Here."After some checking -- consisting, in part, of looking at the sign on the outfield wall -- Mr. Baseball determined that the billboard touts the Maryland State Lottery.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | February 21, 1997
Most of the year, Downs Memorial Park in Pasadena welcomes campers, picnickers and concertgoers. But in February and March, it's taken over by a dozen volunteers whose outdoor pastime goes back to Colonial days: "Old Fashioned Maple Syrup Makin'.""It takes about 60 gallons [of sap] to make 1 gallon of syrup," said Chuck Jochen, 60, a retired federal government worker from Pasadena who's into sap.Colonists learned to make syrup from Native Americans, who used birchbark buckets to collect sap, then added heated rocks to condense the sap into syrup because they did not have containers that could withstand fire.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,SUN STAFF | December 5, 1995
A 40-year-old Westminster man pleaded guilty yesterday to burning down a Gamber home last year because his former girlfriend had gotten into a fistfight with family members during her father's funeral in West Virginia.Walter Gilliam Mitchell of the first block of Chase St. agreed to plead guilty in Carroll County Circuit Court to first-degree arson and first-degree burglary. In exchange, prosecutors dropped remaining arson-related charges against him.In addition, prosecutors agreed to seek no more than 30 years in prison when Mitchell is sentenced on Feb. 12.According to a statement of facts, Mitchell became angry on Feb. 6, 1994, when his former girlfriend, Dianna Patton, called to tell him that she and her sister, Carolyn Brown, had gotten into a fight at the funeral in Martinsville, W.Va.
NEWS
April 22, 1993
Mother was the necessity of invention for sixth-grader Akhil Rastogi of Fairfax County, Va., one of the youngest people ever issued a patent by the U.S. Patent Office.His screw-on, nonspill, pour spout for unwieldy milk jugs was invented when he was a mere 7 years old, after his mother sustained nerve damage in one hand and it became Akhil's task to fill the milk glasses for the table.The chore was frustrating, as the youngster struggled to keep the milk from splashing to the floor instead of into the glass.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | November 20, 2004
LIFE is full of tough calls, such as what kind of windshield washer solvent you put in your car. Do you go with the $1 jug, the solution that promises not to freeze until the temperature drops to 20 below zero? Or do you step up to premium stuff, the $5 jug that promises to keep you squirting down to temperatures of 30 below? At stake here are matters of visibility, mobility and maybe even homeland security. If we can't see where we are going, then how as a nation are we going to get there?
NEWS
February 9, 2012
The Sun's recent article about growlers exposed more of Maryland's regulatory absurdities ("A growing movement to widen growler sales," Feb. 5). "Statewide restrictions limit the sale of growlers to brewpubs ... excluding bars and most restaurants. " If there were no restrictions, wouldn't more good beer be sold and thus increase the tax revenues? Maybe it's time to rethink our prohibitionist system. James Bauernschmidt, Severna Park
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2011
It's cool one August morning in a forest near the marsh, quiet but for the occasional bellowing of a few green frogs, and two experts on Maryland's flora and fauna are preparing for a sticky mission. Earl "Bud" Reaves dons a wide-brimmed hat and pulls on a pair of hip waders. "A bad day in the woods is better than a good day somewhere else," says Reaves, a forester for Anne Arundel County. Chris Swarth, clad in a tie-dyed shirt, pulls a bright red flag from his jeans. "We're going to find that tree, and we're going to mark it," says Swarth, the ecologist who directs the Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary in southernmost Anne Arundel County.
NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER and JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTER | March 21, 2006
A male and a female osprey whirled in the air above their nest on the Patuxent River, swooping together, then wheeling away. After separate odysseys to Central or South America, the pair had reunited at the nest where they raised their young together last year. They joined dozens of other osprey pairs that return to the Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary in Lothian around St. Patrick's Day each year. The birds busy themselves sprucing up last year's nests and reigniting the spark with their mates, a naturalist at the sanctuary said.
SPORTS
By David Whitley and David Whitley,ORLANDO SENTINEL | July 14, 2005
ST. ANDREWS, Scotland - It's not easy becoming a British Open champion, but it shouldn't endanger the lives of bystanders. It did 10 years ago at the Old Course, when Ian Baker-Finch teed it up on perhaps the widest expanse of golfing grass on Earth. The shot should have been easier than hitting a ball into St. Andrews Bay. Finch missed the water, but he also missed the first fairway, the adjoining 18th fairway and Arnold Palmer coming up the latter fairway before the ball rolled next to a building and stopped.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | January 22, 2005
I USED TO LAUGH at Baltimore's attitude toward snow. Now I have adopted it. This is a community that, on the whole, fears the flakes. Years ago when I moved here from the Midwest, I couldn't get over the fact that events were canceled and workers sent home before any significant moisture fell from the skies. In one instance that has now become part of family lore, I drove our then-small sons to school on a snowy morning only to be summoned an hour later and told to fetch them. Virtually no one had shown up, so school had been called off. My kids were mortified that their father did not have sense enough to know that when it snowed you were supposed to hunker down, not venture out. Now, however, I have flip-flopped on the flakes.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | November 20, 2004
LIFE is full of tough calls, such as what kind of windshield washer solvent you put in your car. Do you go with the $1 jug, the solution that promises not to freeze until the temperature drops to 20 below zero? Or do you step up to premium stuff, the $5 jug that promises to keep you squirting down to temperatures of 30 below? At stake here are matters of visibility, mobility and maybe even homeland security. If we can't see where we are going, then how as a nation are we going to get there?
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Sun Staff Writer | June 20, 1994
The cool, clear water gushes from an old pipe into the cast-iron bathtub on a shaded corner outside Westminster.People come from Baltimore, from Pennsylvania, from down the street to fill gallon jugs and even 55-gallon drums. Some stop just for a drink.Since 1912, when the Beacham family tapped the spring on its farm in Carroll County, the crystal-clear water has been free for the taking."Mother Nature put it there," says Philip Beacham. "It just happens to be on our property. We can only use a small percent of it. If anybody else can get any good out of it, fine."
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | September 18, 1995
The lowly penny is cold, hard cash to the children of Charles Carroll Elementary School. They counted their millionth penny Friday in a two-year drive to raise $10,000 for computer and media center equipment.Along the way, they learned lessons about thrift, math, organization and logistics.Sorting, counting and storing a million pennies turned out to be more complicated than anyone imagined, said Jane Kacmarski, the language arts specialist who proposed the project after reading about a Florida school that had done it."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2004
Liberty High School in Eldersburg has removed two girls from its junior varsity lacrosse team for the rest of the season and suspended them from classes for three days as a result of a malicious prank the players pulled on their teammates last week. The girls, whose identities are being withheld, were players as well as water carriers for the team. Before taking to the field at a game last week, they drew 16 ounces of water from a urinal in the boys bathroom and added it to the nearly full 10-gallon jug the team uses for drinking water.
BUSINESS
By Jerry Hirsch and Jerry Hirsch,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 12, 2003
E.&J. Gallo Winery became the biggest name in California wine without paying much attention to Napa Valley. But now the Modesto, Calif.-based wine giant has a big crush on the nation's most prestigious grape-growing region. As the 2003 grape harvest gets under way, Gallo is buying 4,000 tons of premier Napa-grown cabernet sauvignon grapes for as little as $1,500 a ton, or about 60 percent below the average price of similar grapes last year, according to industry sources. With the fruit, the privately held company known for its "jug" wines and Sonoma County-grown vintages intends to increase production of cabernet under the Louis J. Martini brand, which it acquired last year, to make it the company's primary purveyor of premium cabernet sauvignon.
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