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NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | January 12, 1992
Ten years after acquiring the Jug Bay Wetland Sanctuary, the county is ready to expand its 330-acre wildlife research and education center near Wayson's Corner.Park officials are negotiating to purchase140 acres of shoreline, woods and meadow southeast of the sanctuary for $900,000, county park administrator Bill Rinehart said. Because of the shortage of public money to purchase new park land, the cost will be paid over four years."Having that 139-plus acres of forest and fields protected will be great news for the animals," whose habitats are shrinking as commercial and residential development checker the region, said Jug Bay supervisor Chris Swarth.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2012
A just-opened boardwalk and creekside platform offer new access to a nature preserve at the southwestern edge of Anne Arundel County, providing kayakers with an entry by water and hikers with and a up-close encounters with its marsh. "The wetland is there. And you can see it through the trees. But without a boardwalk, you can't take advantage of it, both for research and the public," said Chris Swarth, the longtime director of the Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary. At 1,600 acres, it's the largest of Anne Arundel County's parks and hugs an area of the Patuxent River that is popular with kayakers and canoeists.
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NEWS
September 16, 1990
In a move that will ensure long-term protection and open new funding opportunities, Jug Bay has been designated a National Wetlands Sanctuary.The South County wetlands park will be officially incorporated into the Chesapeake Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve (CBNERR) after a Sept. 22 ceremony.The other two sanctuaries, chosen to represent different aspects of the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem, are Monie Bay on the southeastern shore and Otter Point Creek on the northwestern shore.Jug Bay was chosen from among scores of other candidates to represent a river ecosystem.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2011
It's cool one August morning in a forest near the marsh, quiet but for the occasional bellowing of a few green frogs, and two experts on Maryland's flora and fauna are preparing for a sticky mission. Earl "Bud" Reaves dons a wide-brimmed hat and pulls on a pair of hip waders. "A bad day in the woods is better than a good day somewhere else," says Reaves, a forester for Anne Arundel County. Chris Swarth, clad in a tie-dyed shirt, pulls a bright red flag from his jeans. "We're going to find that tree, and we're going to mark it," says Swarth, the ecologist who directs the Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary in southernmost Anne Arundel County.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | February 18, 1994
Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary wants an artist to bring the marsh inside.The park in the southwestern corner of the county is looking for an artist to cover what is now a blank wall at the recently expanded McCann Wetlands Study Center. Park administrators are looking for an irregularly shaped mural about 20 feet by 14 feet -- in paint, tile or any other medium -- that is decorative and educational."The mural will be a teaching tool for us," said Chris Swarth, sanctuary director. "It needs to capture the ecosystem."
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | December 1, 1991
A mining company, scared off by public protests and poor-grade stone, wants to unload 600 acres near the county's Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary -- preferably, corporate officials say, for preservation.But nearly nine months after Genstar Stone Products Co. dropped its plansto extract sand and gravel from the forest and former agricultural lands on the banks of the Patuxent River, neither the state nor any private preservation group has stepped forward to accept the offer.Kim Snyder, Genstar vice president of aggregates, said his firm has pitched the property to several state agencies, including Program Open Space and the State Highway Administration, and the county.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2001
On its face, a Safeway supermarket planned for southern Anne Arundel County has nothing to do with a long-standing goal of vastly expanding the 620-acre Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary several miles to the west. But an ominous-sounding comment attributed to Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller has alarmed advocates of the preservation effort, including County Executive Janet S. Owens. "Jug Bay is going down," Miller reportedly muttered Friday as he walked past county Planning Director Denis Canavan.
NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER and JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTER | March 21, 2006
A male and a female osprey whirled in the air above their nest on the Patuxent River, swooping together, then wheeling away. After separate odysseys to Central or South America, the pair had reunited at the nest where they raised their young together last year. They joined dozens of other osprey pairs that return to the Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary in Lothian around St. Patrick's Day each year. The birds busy themselves sprucing up last year's nests and reigniting the spark with their mates, a naturalist at the sanctuary said.
NEWS
October 24, 1993
Architectural Design Works Inc., a Bel Air-based architectural design firm, has completed a new observation deck at the Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary.The firm was commissioned by the county Recreation and Parks Department through an agreement with Anne Arundel County.Construction required a minimum of disturbance to the wetlands while providing maximum panoramic vies of Jug Bay.Most of the deck was completed by hand in an effort not to disturb wildlife with bulldozers, pile drivers and cranes.
NEWS
March 16, 2001
Parks board officials want Miller's support of Jug Bay in writing Alarmed by a newspaper report this week, Anne Arundel County's Recreation & Parks Advisory Board wants state Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller to put in writing his support for a proposed expansion of the Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary. Miller said he hadn't seen a letter sent to him by the advisory board's chairman, Richard T. McGraw Jr., but probably would not respond because he is not focused on Jug Bay. The Sun reported Wednesday that Miller said "Jug Bay is going down" as he walked past the county planning director, Denis Canavan, last week.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,chris.guy@baltsun.com | November 20, 2008
In the latest turn in a four-year struggle by a Baptist church to build a school in rural Lothian - near one of Anne Arundel's most environmentally sensitive areas - county lawmakers put off a vote this week on legislation that would clear the way for construction and keep the county out of a $3 million lawsuit in federal court. County Council members listened intently Monday as opponents of a proposed expansion of Arundel Bay Christian Academy that would be built on a 57-acre tract near the Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary pleaded against the school, which is affiliated with Riverdale Baptist Church.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | September 21, 2008
About a dozen children watched as a giant fishing net was pulled out of the Otter Point Creek and placed inside an ice chest. The bounty included a largemouth bass, which was tossed back into the water, and a blue crab, which the children gathered around to touch. The remaining fish were sorted and placed into ice chests partially filled with water. One by one, the children reached into the net, caught a slippery creature in their hands and held it up to be identified. "That's a straight bass, that's a bluegill and that's a pumpkin seed," rattled off Margaret McGinty, a Maryland Department of Natural Resources employee.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,Sun reporter | February 28, 2008
The Board of Public Works yesterday unanimously approved a $5.75 million purchase of 30 acres in southern Anne Arundel County, even after Comptroller Peter Franchot questioned whether the price was $2 million too high. Franchot asked county and state officials whether an estimated $2 million in development costs by the current owners were included in the purchase price. He argued that the state should not be reimbursing the developers for those costs. "Are we paying way too much?" Franchot said.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,sun reporter | May 3, 2007
Leopold seeks to protect wetland Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold struck a deal yesterday to have the county buy 30 acres that abut a wetlands sanctuary for $6.1 million from a developer that planned to use it for a shopping center. Leopold said he will submit a supplemental budget request next week to the County Council to acquire the forested parcel in Lothian, across Route 4 from 1,400 acres of wetlands, forests, meadows and fields along the Patuxent River known as the Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary and the Glendening Nature Preserve at Jug Bay in the southwestern part of the county.
NEWS
March 22, 2006
On these chilly gray days when snow that didn't come in January threatens to make a late appearance, a poignant celebration of life's capacity for renewal is under way that should warm even the coldest heart. Soaring above the marshes of Jug Bay along the Patuxent River in Southern Maryland, osprey couples recently returned from separate winter vacations in Central or South America are reuniting for an elaborate mating ritual that will repopulate last year's empty nests. Nature can be credited for the extraordinary behavior of these brown and white hawklike birds that form lasting bonds reinforced annually.
NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER and JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTER | March 21, 2006
A male and a female osprey whirled in the air above their nest on the Patuxent River, swooping together, then wheeling away. After separate odysseys to Central or South America, the pair had reunited at the nest where they raised their young together last year. They joined dozens of other osprey pairs that return to the Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary in Lothian around St. Patrick's Day each year. The birds busy themselves sprucing up last year's nests and reigniting the spark with their mates, a naturalist at the sanctuary said.
NEWS
February 11, 1993
Mids punished for hitting 2 women with pillowsFour male midshipmen have been given demerits for pummeling two female classmates with pillows in a Dec. 3 incident in the Naval Academy's dormitory.The women, both sophomore midshipmen, were bruised, and one received a black eye when the pillow fight got out of hand. Academy spokesman, Cmdr. Mike John, did not know whether the bruises and black eye were the result of punches or sharply snapped pillow cases.Commander John said the male midshipmen -- a senior and three sophomores -- would receive demerits, lose their leave privileges and be placed on probation.
NEWS
By Kevin Harrison | December 31, 1995
The volunteer: Susan Blackstone, who has a doctorate in environmental virology -- the study of viruses found in water -- can find plenty of volunteer opportunities at Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary in the southwestern corner of Anne Arundel County.Ms. Blackstone, an Edgewater resident, has been a volunteer at the park for nearly all the 10 years it has been open and serves on the board of Friends of Jug Bay. Her daughter, Chrissy, 15, also volunteers at the sanctuary.Volunteer's comments: "I read about [Jug Bay]
NEWS
July 24, 2005
How many acres of publicly accessible parkland does the county own? Anne Arundel County owns approximately 11,000 acres of parkland, all open to the public. Undeveloped areas are a large portion of that acreage - there are 4,500 acres of undeveloped, open space land that include hiking trails and forested areas frequented by bird watchers, with virtually no landscaping. The next-largest component of the total parkland is the county's community and athletic parks, which have approximately 4,000 acres.
NEWS
May 7, 2004
Executive director hired by Annapolis Housing Authority The Annapolis Housing Authority has hired a new executive director, officials announced yesterday. Harry D. Sewell, 55, former executive director of the Wilmington, Del., Housing Authority, will begin work on May 24. He also served as director of the Maryland Community Development Administration and interim chairman of the New Orleans Housing Authority. Sewell replaces Clyde Caldwell, who was fired in January after less than a year on the job. The authority oversees Annapolis' nearly 1,100 units of public housing.
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