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By Michael Hill | December 5, 1990
THE MACNEIL/LEHRER REPORT" is sending itself a valentine this week on PBS in the form of a special celebrating its 15th anniversary which airs tomorrow night at 7 o'clock on Maryland Public Television, Channels 22 and 67.There's something a little smarmy about this program. Imagine if CBS did "Dan Rather: A Decade at the Anchor Desk" or ABC did "The Peter Jennings Years." We would be justifiably disgusted at this blatant self-promotion.But, it's membership drive time, PBS' equivalent of a sweep month, so "15 Years of MacNeil/Lehrer" is not really intended to be an insightful examination of this program, but rather a compendium of moments designed to make its regular viewers feel the appropriate combination of guilty and grateful that will make them phone in their contribution.
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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2013
Earlier this year, I wrote about PBS "NewsHour" losing almost half its audience the last eight years and now averaging under a million viewers a night. I attributed that in part to the program not actually reporting news as much as talking to reporters and analysts about news that had already been reported on other outlets. Tuesday night, as I was cycling through the nightly newscasts, I came upon something even I couldn't remember seeing: A last half of the "NewsHour" that consisted of two stories that had already aired somewhere else and one interview segment that I would be generous in describing as an infomercial for PBS. Think about that for a second, two rerun stories -- one of which ran almost three months ago, and an interview that shamelessly promoted another PBS program.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2013
Earlier this year, I wrote about PBS "NewsHour" losing almost half its audience the last eight years and now averaging under a million viewers a night. I attributed that in part to the program not actually reporting news as much as talking to reporters and analysts about news that had already been reported on other outlets. Tuesday night, as I was cycling through the nightly newscasts, I came upon something even I couldn't remember seeing: A last half of the "NewsHour" that consisted of two stories that had already aired somewhere else and one interview segment that I would be generous in describing as an infomercial for PBS. Think about that for a second, two rerun stories -- one of which ran almost three months ago, and an interview that shamelessly promoted another PBS program.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | December 5, 1990
THE MACNEIL/LEHRER REPORT" is sending itself a valentine this week on PBS in the form of a special celebrating its 15th anniversary which airs tomorrow night at 7 o'clock on Maryland Public Television, Channels 22 and 67.There's something a little smarmy about this program. Imagine if CBS did "Dan Rather: A Decade at the Anchor Desk" or ABC did "The Peter Jennings Years." We would be justifiably disgusted at this blatant self-promotion.But, it's membership drive time, PBS' equivalent of a sweep month, so "15 Years of MacNeil/Lehrer" is not really intended to be an insightful examination of this program, but rather a compendium of moments designed to make its regular viewers feel the appropriate combination of guilty and grateful that will make them phone in their contribution.
SPORTS
March 31, 2001
Founded: 1838 Location: Durham, N.C. Enrollment: 6,368 undergraduates Tuition and fees: $25,630 Famous alumni: Former American Red Cross president Elizabeth Dole; CNN anchorwoman Judy Woodruff; NBA player Grant Hill of the Orlando Magic; novelists Anne Tyler, Reynolds Price and William Styron. Academic ranking: No. 8 among national universities, according to U.S. News & World Report School colors: Royal blue and white Nickname: Blue Devils, after an Alpine unit of French soldiers noted for their courage in World War I. Last trip to Final Four: 1999 NCAA basketball titles: Two, 1991, 1992
FEATURES
By Caroline Wilbert and Caroline Wilbert,COX NEWS SERVICE | August 18, 2004
ATLANTA - Princell Hair, who heads the U.S. news operations at CNN, is giving the term "road show" new meaning. Anchor Paula Zahn will be the host of a town hall meeting at 8 tonight in Canton, Ohio. Folks from the battleground state will get the chance to pose questions to campaign operatives for President Bush and Sen. John Kerry. "It is a format I like a lot because I think it is spontaneous," said Zahn. But Hair plans to send anchors of the prime-time shows, as well as the afternoon political programs, on the road as well.
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1999
Judy Woodruff, the senior CNN correspondent, and Al Hunt, executive Washington editor for the Wall Street Journal, didn't know what to expect the summer day in 1998 when they brought their eldest son to Kennedy Krieger Institute in Baltimore. "We were so scared," Hunt recalled.Jeff, then 16, was semi-comatose, the result of a routine surgery gone awry. He couldn't walk, talk or eat, even blink his eyes; most of the day, he slept. Oddly, the therapist who arrived in his room within the first hour didn't seem to notice.
NEWS
March 14, 2013
Even Thomas Schaller would agree that statistics don't lie ("The myth of 'liberal media bias,'" March 6). Liberals make up only 20 percent of the electorate, yet they dominate the media. One only has to watch Judy Woodruff hyperventilate when speaking about guns to see how "unbiased' supposedly independent news organizations like the Public Broadcasting System are. The New York Times, Washington Post, Huffington Post, Tribune and 99 percent of the other major print and online media all pander to the collective nanny state and its agenda.
FEATURES
By Gerri Kobren | February 28, 1991
This has been the first war in which "people in Kansas City have [information] as fast as the president does," says Judy Woodruff, chief Washington correspondent for PBS' "MacNeil/Lehrer Newshour." And that phenomenon, she added, in the evenhanded style characteristic of her show, has both a positive and a negative side.Speaking at Westminster Hall, as part of a noontime lecture series sponsored by the University of Maryland at Baltimore, Ms. Woodruff pointed out that television coverage of this war is unprecedented in its immediacy and ubiquitousness.
NEWS
By Dallas Morning News | June 16, 1994
Paula Corbin Jones, the former Arkansas state employee who last month filed a sexual harassment suit against President Clinton, begins a national media tour tonight by talking to Sam Donaldson on ABC's "PrimeTime Live."Ms. Jones charges that Mr. Clinton, while governor of Arkansas in 1991, tried to seduce her in a Little Rock hotel room. The White House has said the charges are false and declined to comment further to "PrimeTime," Mr. Donaldson said.In excerpts provided by ABC, Ms. Jones indicated that her lawsuit could be settled "if he was to make a public apology and it be what I want.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2013
(Updates at end with response from NewsHour) With the word Tuesday that "NewsHour" was shutting down offices and laying off employees, it's time to ask the question: Just how much of the this one-time PBS bedrock is actually left? In fact, let's go a step further and ask if it is even accurate to call it a nightly newscast any more -- and if what's left is worth trying to save? I know I've been avoiding asking those questions for at least four years even though they begged to be asked.
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