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By Dave Rosenthal | September 6, 2012
Judy Blume, the chronicler of youth angst in such books as " Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing" and "Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret," is writing now about a much more personal battle against breast cancer. In a blog post titled !@#$% Happens, Blume writes of a summer that began with plans for a trip to Italy and soon moved on to surgery. As you might expect, she blends plenty of  self-deprecating humor into her tale. She's healing now, a month after surgery, and looking forward to writing again.
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By Dave Rosenthal | September 6, 2012
Judy Blume, the chronicler of youth angst in such books as " Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing" and "Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret," is writing now about a much more personal battle against breast cancer. In a blog post titled !@#$% Happens, Blume writes of a summer that began with plans for a trip to Italy and soon moved on to surgery. As you might expect, she blends plenty of  self-deprecating humor into her tale. She's healing now, a month after surgery, and looking forward to writing again.
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By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | October 29, 2003
She was relieved, now that it was over, to have made good on a promise to a persistent 9-year-old relative to speak at his school in Baltimore. It went so well, that as she left the Park School yesterday, path-breaking children's author Judy Blume wished aloud that she could speak to kids at a public school, too. In fact she wished she could talk to kids more often. On the other hand, it's a mystery to her why anybody thinks that writers who hide themselves away to get their ideas on paper could possibly feel comfortable standing before hundreds of kids.
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By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | October 29, 2003
She was relieved, now that it was over, to have made good on a promise to a persistent 9-year-old relative to speak at his school in Baltimore. It went so well, that as she left the Park School yesterday, path-breaking children's author Judy Blume wished aloud that she could speak to kids at a public school, too. In fact she wished she could talk to kids more often. On the other hand, it's a mystery to her why anybody thinks that writers who hide themselves away to get their ideas on paper could possibly feel comfortable standing before hundreds of kids.
NEWS
By HAL PIPER | March 25, 1995
"Thirteen-year-old Salamanca's mother leaves home suddenly on a spiritual quest, vowing to return, but can't keep her promise. . . . Sal meets Phoebe Winterbottom, also 13, . . . whose mother has also left home.The book is ''Walk Two Moons,'' by Sharon Creech. It sounds like loads of fun: The review in School Library Journal praises its ''humor and suspense,'' if you're in the mood for humor about a mother's death. At least there is a happy ending: ''Phoebe's mother does return home, bringing with her a son previously unknown to her family, who is accepted with alacrity.
FEATURES
By Melody Holmes | July 21, 1999
Home base isn't just for baseball anymore. Author Judy Blume has created her own Web site, called Homebase, at www.judyblume.com. It is full of information about the author and her books, and she also offers advice to readers. The site includes a list of Blume's books by category and a helpful section called "Writing Tips," where Blume shares with aspiring writers her ideas and advice on issues like rewriting, dealing with teachers, getting published, finding your own style and dealing with rejection.
FEATURES
February 12, 2008
85 Franco Zeffirelli Movie director 70 Judy Blume Author 53 Arsenio Hall Actor 40 Chynna Phillips Singer 28 Christina Ricci Actress
NEWS
April 18, 1999
" 'Superfudge' by Judy Blume is mostly about Peter's mom having another baby when Peter already has a little brother named Fudge who is a pain. Peter thinks the new baby will be just like Fudge. After the baby is born, Peter realizes the baby girl is not as bad as Fudge and funny things start happening in the Hatcher house. Read this book and find out about the other exciting events in 'Superfudge.' "-- Jenn HudsonPine Grove Elementary" 'How to Eat Fried Worms' by Thomas Rockwell is a great book.
FEATURES
August 30, 1998
"My favorite book is 'Arthur's Eyes' by Marc Brown. I like this book because he picks these glasses and then when he comes to school the kids call him 'four eyes.'"-- Erin ShaferBedford Elementary"This summer I read 'Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing' by Judy Blume. It is very funny. It is about a boy named Peter and his annoying brother, Fudge. My favorite part was when Fudge swallowed his brother's turtle. It is a wonderful book for someone with a pesty little brother."-- Connor LynchPerry Hall Elementary"A good book that I read was 'So Far From Home' by Barry Denenberg.
NEWS
By Tricia Eller | January 23, 2000
Ever wonder what your child's favorite authors read when they were children? The Homearts Network talked with some of America's favorites to find out who they thought should be on every kid's reading list. Here's what some of them said: R.L. Stine, popular author of the spooky Goosebumps series "The Adventures of Pinocchio" by Carlo Collodi: "One of my earliest memories of any kind is of my mother reading a chapter of the original Pinocchio to me every day before my nap time. I must have been really little, no more than 3 years old, and I remember being fascinated by that story."
FEATURES
By Melody Holmes | July 21, 1999
Home base isn't just for baseball anymore. Author Judy Blume has created her own Web site, called Homebase, at www.judyblume.com. It is full of information about the author and her books, and she also offers advice to readers. The site includes a list of Blume's books by category and a helpful section called "Writing Tips," where Blume shares with aspiring writers her ideas and advice on issues like rewriting, dealing with teachers, getting published, finding your own style and dealing with rejection.
NEWS
By HAL PIPER | March 25, 1995
"Thirteen-year-old Salamanca's mother leaves home suddenly on a spiritual quest, vowing to return, but can't keep her promise. . . . Sal meets Phoebe Winterbottom, also 13, . . . whose mother has also left home.The book is ''Walk Two Moons,'' by Sharon Creech. It sounds like loads of fun: The review in School Library Journal praises its ''humor and suspense,'' if you're in the mood for humor about a mother's death. At least there is a happy ending: ''Phoebe's mother does return home, bringing with her a son previously unknown to her family, who is accepted with alacrity.
NEWS
December 20, 2000
"I would recommend 'Pyramids' by Gallimard Jeunnesse because I learned a lot. It told about how they buried kings as mummies in the pyramids when they died." -- Ronald McCullough, William Paca Elementary " 'Freckle Juice' by Judy Blume was about a kid who had freckles all over his face and a girl who said she had a secret recipe that would make the freckles disappear. This is a silly and nice book! " -- Lindsay B. Caplan, Beth Tfiloh Community School " 'Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone' by J. K. Rowling is a very exciting book.
TRAVEL
September 20, 2009
2009 National Book Festival Where: : National Mall, between Seventh and 14th streets in Washington When: : 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Saturday What: : A slew of celebrity writers from John Irving to Jodi Picoult are scheduled to take part in this year's National Book Festival, organized by the Library of Congress to celebrate the joy of reading. Book signings take place throughout the day at pavilions dedicated to fiction, children, biography, poetry, mysteries and more. Authors expected to participate include James Patterson, Marilynne Robinson, Judy Blume, John Grisham, Junot Diaz, Colson Whitehead, Jeannette Walls and Julia Glass.
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