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By Dave Rosenthal | September 6, 2012
Judy Blume, the chronicler of youth angst in such books as " Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing" and "Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret," is writing now about a much more personal battle against breast cancer. In a blog post titled !@#$% Happens, Blume writes of a summer that began with plans for a trip to Italy and soon moved on to surgery. As you might expect, she blends plenty of  self-deprecating humor into her tale. She's healing now, a month after surgery, and looking forward to writing again.
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By Dave Rosenthal | September 6, 2012
Judy Blume, the chronicler of youth angst in such books as " Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing" and "Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret," is writing now about a much more personal battle against breast cancer. In a blog post titled !@#$% Happens, Blume writes of a summer that began with plans for a trip to Italy and soon moved on to surgery. As you might expect, she blends plenty of  self-deprecating humor into her tale. She's healing now, a month after surgery, and looking forward to writing again.
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By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | October 29, 2003
She was relieved, now that it was over, to have made good on a promise to a persistent 9-year-old relative to speak at his school in Baltimore. It went so well, that as she left the Park School yesterday, path-breaking children's author Judy Blume wished aloud that she could speak to kids at a public school, too. In fact she wished she could talk to kids more often. On the other hand, it's a mystery to her why anybody thinks that writers who hide themselves away to get their ideas on paper could possibly feel comfortable standing before hundreds of kids.
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By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | October 29, 2003
She was relieved, now that it was over, to have made good on a promise to a persistent 9-year-old relative to speak at his school in Baltimore. It went so well, that as she left the Park School yesterday, path-breaking children's author Judy Blume wished aloud that she could speak to kids at a public school, too. In fact she wished she could talk to kids more often. On the other hand, it's a mystery to her why anybody thinks that writers who hide themselves away to get their ideas on paper could possibly feel comfortable standing before hundreds of kids.
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By HAL PIPER | March 25, 1995
"Thirteen-year-old Salamanca's mother leaves home suddenly on a spiritual quest, vowing to return, but can't keep her promise. . . . Sal meets Phoebe Winterbottom, also 13, . . . whose mother has also left home.The book is ''Walk Two Moons,'' by Sharon Creech. It sounds like loads of fun: The review in School Library Journal praises its ''humor and suspense,'' if you're in the mood for humor about a mother's death. At least there is a happy ending: ''Phoebe's mother does return home, bringing with her a son previously unknown to her family, who is accepted with alacrity.
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By Melody Holmes | July 21, 1999
Home base isn't just for baseball anymore. Author Judy Blume has created her own Web site, called Homebase, at www.judyblume.com. It is full of information about the author and her books, and she also offers advice to readers. The site includes a list of Blume's books by category and a helpful section called "Writing Tips," where Blume shares with aspiring writers her ideas and advice on issues like rewriting, dealing with teachers, getting published, finding your own style and dealing with rejection.
FEATURES
February 12, 2008
85 Franco Zeffirelli Movie director 70 Judy Blume Author 53 Arsenio Hall Actor 40 Chynna Phillips Singer 28 Christina Ricci Actress
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By Garrison Keillor | May 25, 2010
In New York the other night, I ran into my daughter's favorite author, Mary Pope Osborne, whose "Magic Tree House" books I've read to the child at night, and a moment later, Scott Turow, who writes legal thrillers that keep people awake all night, and David Remnick, the biographer of President Barack Obama. Bang bang bang, one heavyweight after another. Erica Jong, Jeffrey Toobin, Judy Blume. It was a rooftop party in Tribeca that I got invited to via a well-connected pal, wall-to-wall authors and agents and editors and elegant young women in little black dresses, standing, white wine in hand, looking out across the Hudson at the lights of Hoboken and Jersey City, eating shrimp and scallops and spanikopita on toothpicks, all talking at once the way New Yorkers do. I grew up on the windswept plains with my nose in a book, so I am awestruck in the presence of book people, even though I have written a couple books myself.
NEWS
April 18, 1999
" 'Superfudge' by Judy Blume is mostly about Peter's mom having another baby when Peter already has a little brother named Fudge who is a pain. Peter thinks the new baby will be just like Fudge. After the baby is born, Peter realizes the baby girl is not as bad as Fudge and funny things start happening in the Hatcher house. Read this book and find out about the other exciting events in 'Superfudge.' "-- Jenn HudsonPine Grove Elementary" 'How to Eat Fried Worms' by Thomas Rockwell is a great book.
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August 30, 1998
"My favorite book is 'Arthur's Eyes' by Marc Brown. I like this book because he picks these glasses and then when he comes to school the kids call him 'four eyes.'"-- Erin ShaferBedford Elementary"This summer I read 'Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing' by Judy Blume. It is very funny. It is about a boy named Peter and his annoying brother, Fudge. My favorite part was when Fudge swallowed his brother's turtle. It is a wonderful book for someone with a pesty little brother."-- Connor LynchPerry Hall Elementary"A good book that I read was 'So Far From Home' by Barry Denenberg.
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By Melody Holmes | July 21, 1999
Home base isn't just for baseball anymore. Author Judy Blume has created her own Web site, called Homebase, at www.judyblume.com. It is full of information about the author and her books, and she also offers advice to readers. The site includes a list of Blume's books by category and a helpful section called "Writing Tips," where Blume shares with aspiring writers her ideas and advice on issues like rewriting, dealing with teachers, getting published, finding your own style and dealing with rejection.
NEWS
By HAL PIPER | March 25, 1995
"Thirteen-year-old Salamanca's mother leaves home suddenly on a spiritual quest, vowing to return, but can't keep her promise. . . . Sal meets Phoebe Winterbottom, also 13, . . . whose mother has also left home.The book is ''Walk Two Moons,'' by Sharon Creech. It sounds like loads of fun: The review in School Library Journal praises its ''humor and suspense,'' if you're in the mood for humor about a mother's death. At least there is a happy ending: ''Phoebe's mother does return home, bringing with her a son previously unknown to her family, who is accepted with alacrity.
NEWS
By Tricia Eller | January 23, 2000
Ever wonder what your child's favorite authors read when they were children? The Homearts Network talked with some of America's favorites to find out who they thought should be on every kid's reading list. Here's what some of them said: R.L. Stine, popular author of the spooky Goosebumps series "The Adventures of Pinocchio" by Carlo Collodi: "One of my earliest memories of any kind is of my mother reading a chapter of the original Pinocchio to me every day before my nap time. I must have been really little, no more than 3 years old, and I remember being fascinated by that story."
NEWS
November 14, 1999
"I liked 'You Can Say "No to Drugs" ' by Gretchen Super because I enjoy reading chapter books. I like books that teach kids to be drug free. This book teaches me many things about staying away from drugs and things that could hurt my body."-- Evan Smith, Leithwalk Elementary"My favorite book is 'Cam Jansen and the Mystery of the Dinosaur Bones' by David Adler. It's about Cam and Eric going on a mystery hunt for the missing bones stolen from the Kurt Daub Museum. Read the book to figure out why her nickname is Cam and who stole the dinosaur bones.
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