Advertisement
HomeCollectionsJudo
IN THE NEWS

Judo

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Karen Arnett de Rodgriguez | February 25, 2014
It's probably safe to assume most of us are looking forward to spring. It's no coincidence that snow is a four-lettered word. Especially after the past two weeks. But all this snow didn't prevent the youth of our neighborhood from accomplishing some pretty impressive achievements. David Dippel, 6, won all three of his Brazilian Jujitsu matches in a tournament at Team Maryland BJJ in Clarksville. In addition, David is preparing for a judo competition scheduled for March in Hyattsville, as well as upcoming tournaments in New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania and Hawaii.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Karen Arnett de Rodgriguez | February 25, 2014
It's probably safe to assume most of us are looking forward to spring. It's no coincidence that snow is a four-lettered word. Especially after the past two weeks. But all this snow didn't prevent the youth of our neighborhood from accomplishing some pretty impressive achievements. David Dippel, 6, won all three of his Brazilian Jujitsu matches in a tournament at Team Maryland BJJ in Clarksville. In addition, David is preparing for a judo competition scheduled for March in Hyattsville, as well as upcoming tournaments in New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania and Hawaii.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | July 21, 1996
ATLANTA -- David Khakhaleichvili of the Republic of Georgia was favored to win the heavyweight judo competition here the same way he won gold in Barcelona, Spain, four years ago. But there was no medal for him these Games. There was never even a chance to compete."This is the worst thing that has ever happened in my life, and I don't know if I want to live anymore," Khakhaleichvili said through an interpreter at the end of his day of failure.He should have known it was going to be a bad day when he awoke with a throbbing toothache.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2012
This is the third article in an occasional series about Maryland area athletes away from the game. Tommy Hunter still hears it a lot in the Orioles clubhouse. "Judo champ coming!" someone will sing out. "Here comes Judo Boy!" another player will say. "It definitely gets old," the veteran right-hander says with a weary smile. "I've heard it since I've been playing baseball. . . I roll with it. " Sure, as a two-time Junior Olympics gold medalist in judo, the 6-foot-3, 260-pound Hunter could get one of his wise-guy teammates in a wicked armbar or chokehold and end the needling in a heartbeat.
SPORTS
By Philip Hersh and Philip Hersh,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 16, 2004
ATHENS - At Friday's opening ceremony, the secretary-general of the United Nations said in a videotaped message that the Olympics can "open a window of hope" toward better understanding among nations. Within two days, that notion was proved to be merely utopian. Yesterday, a two-time world champion judo athlete from Iran was disqualified after what most suspected was a ruse to avoid a first-round Olympic match with an athlete from Israel. The official reason for Arash Miresmaeili's withdrawal was failure to make weight in the 66-kilogram class.
NEWS
By Jeff Seidel and Jeff Seidel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 21, 2004
Yoji Kondo certainly keeps busy with his day job. An astrophysicist with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Kondo is a co-investigator on an observatory scheduled to be launched in 2007 that will seek Earth-like planets in our galaxy. But Kondo, the scientist, finds enjoyment and relaxation in what he does at night and on weekends - which includes teaching aikido and judo at Columbia Athletic Club. He is accomplished in both, having earned sixth-degree black belts in each martial art. "It has very substantial side benefits," said Kondo, 70, a Columbia resident who began teaching the forms in the late 1960s.
FEATURES
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | June 13, 2001
At John Anderson's judo club, the first thing you'd better do is bow to your opponent. Show him some respect. Then throw him to the floor. If all goes well, and you end up, say, propping a knee on his chest, or holding his arm in a position where he must either surrender or break a bone, then stand and bow again - no hard feelings here at the dojo - and later you'll head home refreshed, relaxed and ready to approach life with your head screwed on...
SPORTS
By Ken Murray, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2010
Each week, we bring you a Q&A with a Ravens player to help you get to know him better. Today's guest is safety Haruki Nakamura, 24, a third-year veteran who grew up in a family of judo champions and played football to forge his own identity in the family. Question: How far back does you family's judo tradition run? Answer: It started with my father [Ryozo]. He was actually being shuffled around the world to teach judo. He came from Japan to the United States in the '60s and ended up being one of the top referees in judo.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | June 8, 1995
A 61-year-old Columbia martial arts instructor was cleared yesterday of criminal charges alleging that he fondled an 11-year-old girl who was taking judo lessons from him last summer.Bernard Raymond Gilbert, of the 10800 block of Hunting Lane, was found not guilty of child abuse, assault, battery and four sexual offenses by a Howard Circuit Court jury of nine women and three men.The Columbia girl testified Monday that Mr. Gilbert touched her sexual organs several times while she took computer tests on judo history at the U.S. Judo Club in the Guilford Industrial Center.
SPORTS
By Dan Mihalopoulos and Dan Mihalopoulos,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 12, 2004
NEA PHILADELPHIA, Greece - At her dojo in this Athens suburb, watched by a silver-gilt icon of the Virgin Mary and a portrait of judo's stern Japanese founder, Eleni Ioannou sweated four hours a day in pursuit of Olympic glory. Despite the pressure of representing her country this month on home soil, the 20-year-old Greek heavyweight champion smiled almost constantly, her teammates and coach say. She often interrupted training sessions with horseplay, drawing reproaches from the coach and earning the nickname "Silly Eleni."
SPORTS
By Jakob Engelke, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2011
Christina Salmond always wanted to make it back into a judo dojo. After leaving the sport following her senior year of high school to "go to college, get my degree and go on with my life," the 32-year-old Glen Burnie resident swore she would one day return to the sport she started training in at the age of 8. But as life went on and other priorities took over — Salmond currently works full-time as a web developer for the University of...
SPORTS
By Ken Murray, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2010
Each week, we bring you a Q&A with a Ravens player to help you get to know him better. Today's guest is safety Haruki Nakamura, 24, a third-year veteran who grew up in a family of judo champions and played football to forge his own identity in the family. Question: How far back does you family's judo tradition run? Answer: It started with my father (Ryozo). He was actually being shuffled around the world to teach judo. He came from Japan to the United States in the 60s and ended up being one of the top referees in judo.
SPORTS
August 14, 2008
* Archery Vic Wunderle is the only U.S. archer still alive in the men's competition. * BaseballOn the opening night of play, the U.S. suffered a stinging defeat by South Korea, 8-7. The U.S. trailed 6-4 going into the ninth and was able to take a 7-6 lead but couldn't hold on. * Basketball The U.S. women beat Mali, 97-41. Lisa Leslie led all scorers with 16 points. Four others scored more than 10 points. The U.S. on Friday plays Spain, which beat the Czech Republic. * Beach VolleyballThe U.S. continued to steamroll through competition as the men's team of Phil Dalhausser and Todd Rogers beat Martin Conde and Mariano Baracetti of Argentina in the morning, 21-12, 21-13.
SPORTS
By MIKE PRESTON | May 9, 2008
During the next three days, a lot of the Ravens' attention will be focused on quarterback Joe Flacco, the team's top draft pick out of Delaware. But the sleeper of the Ravens' draft is a safety of Japanese heritage out of the University of Cincinnati named Haruki Nakamura. Nakamura was a sixth-round pick, and general manager Ozzie Newsome and secondary coach Mark Carrier love the guy. "When I watched him play, he was always moving, always in motion, always getting in the film," Carrier said.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,sun reporter | February 2, 2008
They range in height from 3 1/2 feet to 5 feet, 9 inches, in shape from chubby to lithe, but when Shaun Wilson claps or shouts, the boys and girls in the white gis and sweat shirts move as one -- crab-walking, sprawling to the mat and back to their feet, striking the padded walls with resounding thump-thump-thumps. It's early evening at the Baltimore Martial Arts Academy in Ellicott City, and Wilson, a veteran instructor and competitor, is putting his advanced youth class (ages 8-14) through its paces.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,[special to the sun] | January 7, 2007
Gabriella Denu wrapped her arms around a 114-pound opponent's waist, lifted him onto his tiptoes and threw him to the floor. Then she flipped a 121-pound foe over her shoulder. After she crashed the wrestler onto the mat, the 5-foot, 106-pound Gabriella plopped down and pinned him. Just as quickly as she handled teammates during the recent practice session, the freshman has subdued skepticism about a girl being on John Carroll School's junior varsity wrestling team. "At first I was worried about whether or not the boys would accept me as a part of the team, but it did not take much to prove myself," she said.
SPORTS
By Sharman Stein and Sharman Stein,Chicago Tribune | January 20, 1991
CHICAGO -- Seeing the scale read 158 does not dismay Diana Bridges the way it might another weight-conscious woman. Nor does finding her 5-foot-9-inch frame flat on its back, knocked unconscious -- or, more likely, standing over somebody else whom she has thrown to the ground or has clinched in an armlock.Bridges, 26, is a rare breed in the United States, a female judo champion in a country that has barely given the Japanese sport a chance.And Bridges has done more than win matches against the few other U.S. women who participate in the sport.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Sun Staff | August 22, 2004
For the uninitiated, the high-tech, head-to-toe costumes that covered Olympic fencing contestants Mariel Zagunis and Sada Jacobson last week made it as difficult to read their faces as it was their every move. But when Zagunis, a 19-year-old college freshman from Oregon, took the gold medal for women's saber fencing Tuesday, there was no mistaking her reaction. She took off her mask, smiled and jumped into the air and into the arms of her coach, not once but several times. After all, hers was the first medal ever for an American woman in the 80 years Olympic fencing has been open to them, and the first for a U.S. fencer in 20 years.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.